Learning Through Research

Quarterly Undergraduate Research Highlights Submission Sample

 

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Journal Submission

Q. Please provide the Author Names from Citation: All names should be in Last IN, format separated by commas, with a period at the end.

A. Parker JS, Stewart GS, Gantt C.

Q. Title of Article: Full title from article, followed by a period.

A. Research and Intervention with Adolescents Exposed to Domestic Violence.

Q. Journal: Please include full title.

A. Family Therapy.

Q. Year:

A. 2006

Q. Issue:

A. 33

Q. Page Numbers: (If applicable)

A. 45-52

Q. Institution where research was performed:

A. University of South Carolina Upstate

Q. Please provide a brief description (3-5 lines) of the research and its significance.

A. The present study examined characteristics of adolescents exposed to domestic violence and tested a group intervention protocol utilizing expressive writing (EW) as a coping method for this population. The experimental group used "Positive Points", a list of personal strengths, in the writing intervention based on the hypothesis that their use would increase cognitive insight and positive word usage. A significant group effect was found and all participants demonstrated positive overall emotional change as a result of EW.

Q.Please provide a sentence describing the title and department or program affiliation of the faculty members (if applicable).

A. Jennifer Parker is an assistant professor of psychology.

Q. Please provide a brief description of the student coauthor(s). Include the year of study in which the student(s) undertook the work, the opportunity through which the work was undertaken, (independent study project, summer project, REU program, senior thesis project, etc.), and the current status of the student (graduate school, employed, still enrolled, etc).

A. Gina Stewart is currently in a doctoral program in psychology at the University of Mississippi. Courtney Gannt is employed and in the process of applying to graduate programs.

Q. Please provide a sentence describing the source of funding for the work.

A. The research was supported by a USC Scholarly Research and Development Award and a mini-grant from the USC Upstate Center for Undergraduate Research, which was awarded to Stewart.

The end result of this survey will result in a highlight in the following format:

EXAMPLE OF PROPER FORMAT REQUIREMENTS - SUBMISSIONS MUST CONFORM TO THIS FORMAT TO BE CONSIDERED.

Parker JS, Stewart GS, Gantt C. Research and Intervention with Adolescents Exposed to Domestic Violence. Family Therapy. 2006;33:45-52. (University of South Carolina Upstate) 

The present study examined characteristics of adolescents exposed to domestic violence and tested a group intervention protocol utilizing expressive writing (EW) as a coping method for this population. The experimental group used "Positive Points", a list of personal strengths, in the writing intervention based on the hypothesis that their use would increase cognitive insight and positive word usage. A significant group effect was found and all participants demonstrated positive overall emotional change as a result of EW. Jennifer Parker is an assistant professor of psychology. Gina Stewart and Courtney Gantt, both senior psychology majors, participated in the research for independent study credit. The research was supported by a USC Scholarly Research and Development Award and a mini grant from the USC Upstate Center for Undergraduate Research, which was awarded to Stewart. She is currently in a doctoral program in psychology at the University of Mississippi. Gannt is employed and in the process of applying to graduate programs.

Juried Competition or Performance

Q. Author Names from Citation: All names should be in Last IN, format separated by commas, with a period at the end.

A. Charney M, and the Clemson University Fall 2009 Theater 195/295/395 class.

Q. Presentation title: Followed by a period.

A. The Power Behind the Palette.

Q. Presentation Date:

A. staged November 17-22

Q. Year:

A. 2009

Q. Presentation Location:

A. Clemson, SC.

Q. Medium:

A. Original play

Q. Institution where research was performed:

A. Clemson University

Q. Please provide a brief description (3-5 lines) of the research and its significance.

A. Written and directed by Mark J. Charney, this original play tracing the life and times of art dealer Ambroise Vollard was originated, staged and performed by his Theater 195/295/395 classes. Students in art, English, and Performing Arts researched the period, helped to envision and outline the play, designed the music, developed the characters, and performed the ensemble-based project.  The play received a Highly Recommend and a Recommend from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival respondents.  Charney received an award for Meritorious Directing, and play nominated for the David Mark Cohen award in Playwriting. Chosen as an Alternate for the Region IV Kennedy Center Festival, February 2010.

Q.Please provide a sentence describing the title and department or program affiliation of the faculty members (if applicable).

A. Mark Charney is director of theatre. He, along with Richard Goodstein, chair of English, taught the three-semester course.

Q. Please provide a brief description of the student coauthor(s). Include the year of study in which the student(s) undertook the work, the opportunity through which the work was undertaken, (independent study project, summer project, REU program, senior thesis project, etc.), and the current status of the student (graduate school, employed, still enrolled, etc).

A. Participants included Jeffrey Russell, who is nominated for a Kennedy Center award for his sound design; Ryan McCrary, who played the role of Paul Cezanne; Christopher Onken, who originated the role of Degas; and Andrew Herrera, who played Vollard. Both Onken and Herrera were nominated for Irene Ryan acting awards through the Kennedy Center, as was Kate Lala, who played Marie. Terry Brannen and Becca McBride rounded out the cast, and Ashley Wood served as dramaturg and art advisor. Both McCrary and Herrera are presently auditioning for MFA programs.

The end result of this survey will result in a highlight in the following format:

EXAMPLE OF PROPER FORMAT REQUIREMENTS - SUBMISSIONS MUST CONFORM TO THIS FORMAT TO BE CONSIDERED.

Charney M, and the Clemson University Fall 2009 Theater 195/295/395 class. The Power Behind the Palette. Original play, staged November 17-22, 2009; Clemson, SC. (Clemson University)

Written and directed by Mark J. Charney, this original play tracing the life and times of art dealer Ambroise Vollard was originated, staged and performed by his Theater 195/295/395 classes. Students in art, English, and Performing Arts researched the period, helped to envision and outline the play, designed the music, developed the characters, and performed the ensemble-based project.  The play received a Highly Recommend and a Recommend from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival respondents.  Charney received an award for Meritorious Directing, and play nominated for the David Mark Cohen award in Playwriting. Chosen as an Alternate for the Region IV Kennedy Center Festival, February 2010. Mark Charney is Director of Theatre. He, along with Richard Goodstein, Chair of English, taught the three-semester course. Participants included Jeffrey Russell, who is nominated for a Kennedy Center award for his sound design; Ryan McCrary, who played the role of Paul Cezanne; Christopher Onken, who originated the role of Degas; and Andrew Herrera, who played Vollard. Both Onken and Herrera were nominated for Irene Ryan acting awards through the Kennedy Center, as was Kate Lala, who played Marie. Terry Brannen and Becca McBride rounded out the cast, and Ashley Wood served as dramaturg and art advisor. Both McCrary and Herrera are presently auditioning for MFA programs.

Online Journal

Q. Author Names from Citation: All names should be in Last IN, format separated by commas, with a period at the end.

A. Walter CW, Gibson ND, Field RL, Snedden AP, Shapiro JZ, Janczak CM, Hanstorp D.

Q. Title of Article:

A. Electron Affinity of Arsenic and the Fine Structure of As- Measured Using Infrared Threshold Photodetachment Spectroscopy.

Q. Journal:

A. Physical Review A.

Q. Year:

A. 2009

Q. Publication Volume:

A. 80

Q. Publication Issue:

A. 014501-1-014501-4

Q. Institution where research was performed:

A. Denison University

Q. Please provide a brief description (3-5 lines) of the research and its significance.

A. This article reports an experimental study of the negative ion of arsenic, i.e. an arsenic atom with one additional electron attached to it. We used a variable wavelength laser to measure the minimum energy required to detach the added electron from the negative ion, thus determining how strongly arsenic binds electrons. Our measurement improved the accuracy of the electron affinity of arsenic by a factor 40 over the previous best measurement, thus providing precise information for this fundamental thermochemical property. Our results will be of use for testing state-of-the-art atomic structure theories and for controlling chemical reactions involving arsenic.

Q.Please provide a sentence describing the title and department or program affiliation of the faculty members (if applicable).

A. Wes Walter and Dan Gibson are professors of physics. Professor Dag Hanstorp from Gothenburg University, Sweden, participated in the project as a visitor to our lab.

Q. Please provide a brief description of the student coauthor(s). Include the year of study in which the student(s) undertook the work, the opportunity through which the work was undertaken (independent study project, summer project, REU program, senior thesis project, etc.), and the current status of the student (graduate school, employed, still enrolled, etc.).

A. Four undergraduate students participated in the research over the summers of 2007 and 2008: Richard Field, Ali Snedden, Jacob Shapiro, and Corey Janczak. Field and Snedden are now in graduate school in physics at the University of Michigan and University of Notre Dame, respectively; Shapiro is a senior double-majoring in physics; and Janczak is employed after graduating with a physics major.

Q. Please provide a sentence describing the source of funding for the work.

A. The research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and by Denison University’s Anderson Summer Research and Bowen Funds, which provided some student summer stipends; Hanstorp received support from the Swedish Research Council and Denison University.

The end result of this survey will result in a highlight in the following format:

EXAMPLE OF PROPER FORMAT REQUIREMENTS - SUBMISSIONS MUST CONFORM TO THIS FORMAT TO BE CONSIDERED.

Walter CW, Gibson ND, Field RL, Snedden AP, Shapiro JZ, Janczak CM, Hanstorp D. Electron Affinity of Arsenic and the Fine Structure of As- Measured Using Infrared Threshold Photodetachment Spectroscopy. Physical Review A. 2009;80:014501-1-014501-4. (Denison University)
 
This article reports an experimental study of the negative ion of arsenic, i.e. an arsenic atom with one additional electron attached to it. We used a variable wavelength laser to measure the minimum energy required to detach the added electron from the negative ion, thus determining how strongly arsenic binds electrons. Our measurement improved the accuracy of the electron affinity of arsenic by a factor 40 over the previous best measurement, thus providing precise information for this fundamental thermochemical property. Our results will be of use for testing state-of-the-art atomic structure theories and for controlling chemical reactions involving arsenic. Wes Walter and Dan Gibson are professors of physics. Professor Dag Hanstorp from Gothenburg University, Sweden, participated in the project as a visitor to our lab. Four undergraduate students participated in the research over the summers of 2007 and 2008: Richard Field, Ali Snedden, Jacob Shapiro, and Corey Janczak. Field and Snedden are now in graduate school in physics at the University of Michigan and University of Notre Dame, respectively, Shapiro is a senior double-majoring in physics, and Janczak is employed after graduating with a physics major. The research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and by Denison University’s Anderson Summer Research and Bowen Funds, which provided some student summer stipends; Hanstorp received support from the Swedish Research Council and Denison University.