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Social Sciences Highlights

Total Listing: 67 (Listed by the order of record adding time, Descending)

( 1 )

Recorded at: 8/14/2019 back to top
Title #NeverTrump: Why Republican Members of Congress Refused to Support Their Party’s Nominee in the 2016 Presidential Election.
Citation Research & Politics. 2018; 5:1: 1–10. doi: 10.1177/2053168017749383. Johnson LR, McCray D, Ragusa JM. College of Charleston
Description In an election characterized by countless headlines, the refusal of Republicans to support their party’s nominee was a constant topic of discussion in 2016. Our paper looks to explain why Republican members of Congress joined the so-called #NeverTrump movement. In the first part, we document the varied—and often contradictory—explanations of the #NeverTrump movement offered by journalists, pundits, and politicians during the campaign. We then categorize these popular explanations into to four theoretical categories: policy preferences, identity, electoral motivations, and establishment dynamics. In the second part, we test the varied claims. We believe two findings stand out and have broader implications for American politics. First, despite the popular belief that members of Congress are single-minded in their pursuit of reelection, we find that a lawmaker’s religion and sex—both in the identity category—had the largest effects on the decision to join the #NeverTrump movement. Second, the results show that establishment Republicans were more likely to support Donald Trump’s candidacy. Notably, the direction of this effect is inconsistent with popular explanations of the #NeverTrump movement but consistent with a range of academic studies.
Faculty Jordan Ragusa is associate professor of political science at the College of Charleston.
Student Lauren Johnson and Deon McCray were undergraduates when this research began in fall 2016 and performed their work as part of independent studies. Both have since graduated. Johnson now lives in Des Moines and works with community organizations on local and state housing policy. McCray lives in Philadelphia and is planning to attend law school.
Funding

( 2 )

Recorded at: 8/14/2019 back to top
Title Does Peacekeeping Really Bring Peace? Peacekeepers and Combatant-Perpetrated Sexual Violence in Civil Wars.
Citation Journal of Conflict Resolution. Kirschner S, Miller A. doi: 10.1177/0022002719831069. Allegheny College
Description Peacekeeping mitigates killing, but nonlethal violence also influences both positive peace and stability. We evaluate peacekeepers’ effect on one such type of abuse, sexual violence. We posit that peacekeepers raise the cost of abuses and foster institutional and cultural changes that curb violence. We find that missions both reduce the chance of any violence and limit its prevalence; larger deployments and multidimensional missions are more effective. Governments curtail violence more quickly than rebels do in response to military contingents; rebels are especially responsive when missions include large civilian components. These findings contribute to our understanding of peacekeeping in three primary ways: we expand the evaluation of peacekeeping to consider nonlethal violence; we draw attention to mission size, capacity to use force, and civilian-led programming as determinants of effectiveness; and we demonstrate how addressing nonlethal violence requires similar tools as lethal violence but is further enhanced by specific civilian-led initiatives.
Faculty Shanna Kirschner is associate professor of political science at Allegheny College.
Student Political science undergraduate Adam Miller worked on the research in 2016–2018 as an independent study and summer project, and graduated in 2018. He is enrolled in the MA program at Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University.
Funding The research was supported by Allegheny College-Howard Hughes Medical Institute Global Health Grant and the NSF Advanced Empirical Research on Politics for Undergraduates Program.

( 3 )

Recorded at: 8/14/2019 back to top
Title A Comparison of Farmers’ Perceived Impacts on the Environment in Belize and Kentucky.
Citation Contemporary Journal of Anthropology and Sociology. 2018; 8: 1: 19–33. Murrell LB, Hume DW. Northern Kentucky University
Description This paper explores how farmers in Belize and Kentucky perceive their impacts on the environment. Ethnographic data were collected from rural farming villages in Orange Walk District (OWD), Belize, and from rural farming communities in northern Kentucky, United States. The findings of the interviews reveal how these two cultures perceive environmental problems, how environmental problems impact them, and how farmers influence the natural world. In addition to examining how rural Belizeans and Kentuckians understand their impacts on the environment (i.e., climate change, water pollution, biodiversity loss, deforestation, energy use and pollution, agricultural pesticide and herbicide use, genetic engineering, soil erosion, invasive species, and population growth), this paper also discusses how perceived environmental concerns and impacts are both similar and different between Belizean and Kentuckian farmers.
Faculty Douglas Hume is chair and associate professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy at Northern Kentucky University (NKU).
Student Laura Bronte Murrell worked on the project as part of a summer study abroad project in Belize and fourth-year honors capstone at NKU; she graduated in 2017.
Funding

( 4 )

Recorded at: 4/5/2019 back to top
Title Why Women Protest: Insights from Ukraine’s EuroMaidan
Citation Slavic Review. 2018; 77: 3: 726–751. doi: 10.1017/slr.2018.207 Nikolayenko O, DeCasper M. Fordham University
Description This article examines why Ukrainian women participated in the 2013–2014 antigovernment protests, widely known as the EuroMaidan. Based upon in-depth interviews with female protesters, the study uncovers a wide range of motivations for women’s engagement in the revolution, including dissatisfaction with the government, solidarity with protesters, motherhood, civic duty, and professional service. Political discontent was the most cited reason for protesting. Solidarity with protesters was another major catalyst for political engagement. In addition, women who were mothers invoked the notion of mothering to provide a rationale for activism. The study contributes to the growing literature on women’s participation in contentious politics in nondemocracies.
Faculty Olena Nikolayenko is associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Fordham University.
Student Maria DeCasper received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and French language and literature from Fordham University in 2017. As a third-year student, she conducted an independent study project and presented the findings from this project at the 2016 National Conference on Undergraduate Research. DeCasper currently works as a public relations consultant and volunteers for the Kyiv-based nonprofit organization New Generation of Women Leaders in Ukraine.
Funding This research was supported by the Fordham College at Rose Hill.

( 5 )

Recorded at: 4/5/2019 back to top
Title The Impact of 1998 Massachusetts Gun Laws on Suicide: A Synthetic Control Approach.
Citation Economics Letters. 2019; 174: 104–108. doi: org/10.1016/j.econlet.2018.11.004. Kahane LH, Sannicandro P. Providence College
Description In 1998, Massachusetts enacted nearly two dozen gun laws. Using the synthetic control method, we find evidence that these laws led to reduced overall suicide rates for several years and a sustained reduction in suicides carried out with a firearm.
Faculty Leo H. Kahane is the Michael A. Ruane Distinguished Chair in Economics at Providence College.
Student Peter Sannicandro worked on the project as an undergraduate research assistant and graduated in 2018 with a double major in quantitative economics and mathematics. He is currently employed.
Funding The research was supported by the Fund for a Safer Future (as part of the New Venture Fund).

( 6 )

Recorded at: 4/5/2019 back to top
Title Regional Variation in Rivalry: Canadians Really Are Friendlier.
Citation Journal of International Consumer Marketing 2018; 30: 4. doi: 10.1080/08961530.2018.1531364 Cobbs J, Martinez del Campo del Castillo D, Tyler BD, Ditter J. Northern Kentucky University
Description Spectator sports embody social group conflict, where consumers periodically interact with opposing fans, thereby providing outlets for negative brand affect in the form of acrimony toward rivals. To assess the regional nature of sport rivalry, this study compared survey responses from 5,145 sports consumers across the four United States Census regions and Canada, including five professional leagues. Consistent with regional personality clustering, fans of Canadian teams harbor less acrimony toward rivals, and fans of teams in the Northeastern US generally exhibit the most acrimony. We measured acrimony toward rival fans using indicators of prejudice and discrimination adapted from research on racial and ethnic bias. This work on acrimony in sports rivalries is significant because sports marketers and event managers must accurately assess the propensity for violence or other antisocial fan behavior when developing event promotions and security protocol.
Faculty Joe Cobbs is associate professor of sports business and construction management in the Department of Marketing at Northern Kentucky University (NKU), and B. David Tyler is associate professor, sports management, at Western Carolina University.
Student Diego Martinez del Campo graduated from NKU in May 2018 and was recognized as the outstanding student of the year in the Haile/US Bank College of Business. He is a fulltime operations assistant for the FC Cincinnati soccer team. Martinez del Campo undertook work on the project as the focus of an independent study with Cobbs in spring 2018. Jeremy Ditter graduated from NKU in 2016. He is the digital marketing analyst for Peterson Automotive Collection. Ditter started the project as a student in the capstone course for Sports Business & Event Management in spring 2016. Both students conducted the work as part of their fourth-year studies at NKU.
Funding The work was funded through a university faculty summer research fellowship courtesy of NKU.

( 7 )

Recorded at: 2/1/2019 back to top
Title A Machine Learning Approach to Identifying Different Types of Uncertainty.
Citation Economics Letters.2018; 171: 58-62; doi: 10.1016/j.econlet.2018.07.003 Saltzman B, Yung J. Bates College
Description We implement natural language processing techniques to extract uncertainty measures from Federal Reserve Beige Books between 1970 and 2018. Business- and economic- related uncertainty is associated with future weakness in output, higher unemployment, and elevated term premia. On the other hand, political and government uncertainty, while high during recent times, has no statistically significant impact on the economy.
Faculty Julieta Yung is assistant professor in the Economics Department at Bates College.
Student Bennett Saltzman worked on this research as part of a class project in his fourth year; he is now employed at Amenity Analytics.
Funding The research was funded by Blanchard Fund for Economics.

( 8 )

Recorded at: 2/1/2019 back to top
Title Authorship in Undergraduate Research Partnerships: A Really Bad Tango between Undergraduate Protégés and Graduate Student Mentors While Waiting for Professor Godot.
Citation Andes A, Mabrouk PA. In Credit Where Credit Is Due: Respecting Authorship and Intellectual Property, ed. Patricia Ann Mabrouk and Judith N. Currano. ACS Symposium Series, 2018; vol. 1291, 133–158, doi: 10.1021/bk-2018-1291. ch013. Northeastern University.
Description In spite of the importance of authorship in STEM research and the emphasis being placed on the early immersion of undergraduates in authentic research experiences, little is known about undergraduate students’ experience with authorship. In this case study, we probed the experiences of three graduate student mentor-undergraduate student protégé dyads working in the same laboratory to learn about their knowledge and experiences with authorship. We were surprised at the diversity of opinions expressed by the graduate student mentors and their undergraduate protégés— none of whom agreed on the definition of authorship, its requirements, and responsibilities. Even though they recognized their lack of knowledge, the graduate and undergraduate students expressed reluctance to discuss their questions about authorship with their mentor or faculty adviser. These findings suggest additional research is needed into authorship in undergraduate research experiences.
Faculty Patricia Mabrouk is professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Northeastern University.
Student Amy Andes conducted this research during the 2017–2018 academic year to fulfill the capstone requirements for her bachelor’s degree in chemistry. Andes is currently a graduate student at The Ohio State University where she is studying sensory food analysis.
Funding This project was supported by a grant to Mabrouk from the Office of the Provost.

( 9 )

Recorded at: 2/1/2019 back to top
Title Masculinity and Virgin-Shaming among College Men.
Citation Journal of Men's Studies. 2018: 1. doi: 10.1177/1060826518758974. Fleming C, Davis SN. George Mason University
Description This project explores “virgin-shaming,” a phenomenon whereby an individual is called out or made fun of for lacking sexual experience among college men. To investigate this phenomenon, interviews were conducted with 10 men enrolled at one university. Analysis revealed three key findings. First, having sex is often held as a marker of status or achievement of hegemonic masculinity. Second, virgin-shaming is found in social spaces more concerned with upholding masculine norms. Third, virgin-shaming can be used both as an invocation to reassert one’s masculinity and, relatedly, a taunt to encourage others to start having sex. Results highlight how virgin-shaming not only creates stratification within some groups of men but also perpetuates male dominance within society more broadly.
Faculty Shannon N. Davis is professor of sociology at George Mason University.
Student Colby Fleming conducted this independent research in 2015 as part of a fourth-year honors program within the sociology major at Mason. He graduated with a BA in sociology and philosophy, served as a Fulbright English teaching assistant, and is currently employed at a research corporation.
Funding The research was supported by the Office of Student Scholarship, Creative Activities, and Research at George Mason University and through funding awarded to Fleming from the Undergraduate Research Scholar Program.

( 10 )

Recorded at: 2/1/2019 back to top
Title The Plans, Goals,and Concerns of Pre-Emancipated Youth in Foster Care.
Citation Children and Youth Services Review. 2017; 28: 48–55. doi: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.05.003. Lemus D, Farruggia SP, Germo G, Chang E. University of Illinois at Chicago
Description This study focuses on the plans, goals, and concerns of foster care youth prior to leaving care. Participants were 179 pre-emancipated youth between the ages of 17 and 20 (M = 17.82, SD = 0.79) from a large metropolitan area in Southern California. Self-articulated, immediate plans were grouped into 4 major categories and self-articulated life goals were grouped into 10 categories while also examining the prioritization of, estimated time frame for, and youth's sense of control over their life goals. This study contributes to the limited literature on the life goals and plans for foster youth; these results reinforce the need for greater support in planning and goal setting prior to emancipation.
Faculty Susan Farruggia is assistant vice provost of undergraduate affairs and affiliated faculty in psychology at University of Illinois at Chicago. Gary Germo is assistant professor in the Department of Human Services at California State University–Fullerton. Esther Chang is professor of psychology at Soka University of America.
Student Daisy Lemus performed this research as a fourth-year student and is now a graduate student in the School of Social Work at UIC.
Funding

( 11 )

Recorded at: 1/31/2019 back to top
Title Statutory Modification of the Collateral Source Rule.
Citation Journal of Legal Economics. 2017; 23: 2: 81–91. Feeley A, Horan K, and Schap D. College of the Holy Cross
Description Statutory law governing application of the collateral source rule is surveyed for the 50 states, DC, PR, and VI. Statutes are classified into eight major substantive categories and many subcategories in a comprehensive table. A second table presents the amassed information in a jurisdiction-by- jurisdiction fashion. The published research assists forensic economists to formulate appropriate damages.
Faculty David Schap is professor of economics at College of the Holy Cross.
Student Andrew Feeley (Holy Cross class of 2006) developed the summary framework as a summer research assistant in 2005 and in an Honors research thesis in academic year 2005-2006. Feeley is now director, U.S. Consumer Markets Claims Strategy and Planning at the Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., Boston. Kayla Horan (Holy Cross class of 2018) further developed and updated the summary as a research assistant and coauthor during summer 2016. Horan has accepted employment with Ernst and Young in New York City as part of its Northeast Health Care Advisory team.
Funding The May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust funded summer research in 2005, and the Office of the Dean at Holy Cross provided funding for summer research in 2016.

( 12 )

Recorded at: 10/19/2018 back to top
Title “I don’t know where I would be right now if it wasn’t for them”: Emancipated Foster Care Youth and Their Important Non-Parental Adults
Citation Children and Youth Services Review. 2017; 76: 65–73. doi: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.02.015. Duke T, Farruggia SP, Germo GR. University of Illinois at Chicago.
Description Research has identified the benefits of having non-parental adults for older youth in foster care, but less is known about the characteristics of these relationships, as well
Faculty Susan Farruggia is assistant vice provost of undergraduate affairs and affiliated faculty in psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Gary R. Germo is assistant professor in the Department of Human Services at California State University, Fullerton.
Student Taylor Duke performed this research as a fourth-year student and is currently in medical school at the University of Illinois College of Medicine.
Funding

( 13 )

Recorded at: 10/19/2018 back to top
Title Gender Roles and Gender Stereotypes in Four Newbery Award-Winning Books.
Citation SLIS Connecting. 2017; 6:1: ar 6. doi: 10.18785/slis.0601.06. Brower AP. University of Southern Mississippi
Description As gender equality has become a more prominent issue and men and women have become more equal, one would expect this change to be reflected in children's literature. This study examines four Newbery Award-winning books to determine if this change is apparent.
Faculty
Student Alex Paige Brower's honors thesis, on which the publication was based, won the Committee on Services and Resources for Women (CSRW) Kathanne W. Green Award for outstanding student paper focused on a gender topic. Brower is currently a master's student and graduate assistant in the USM School of Library and Information Science.
Funding

( 14 )

Recorded at: 10/19/2018 back to top
Title Perceptions Concerning Obstacles, Stereotypes, and Discrimination Faced by Female Sports Reporters and Other Female Sports Professionals.
Citation Athens Journal of Sports. 2017; 4:3: 213–230. Hyre T, Larson M, Chen S. Shepherd University
Description This study contained two components that addressed perceived obstacles, stereotypes, and discrimination faced by female sports reporters and various trends of studies related to gender inequality. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that inappropriate representation of female professionals’ and athletes’ image and persona is the most relevant and emergent issue today. The perceptions of 157 survey respondents from a university in the Appalachian Region supported the findings of past studies, which indicated stereotypical portrayals of female reporters. Respondents also showed their preferences toward men’s sports and had more respect and faith in male sports journalists. Recommendations and suggestions are given to raise the awareness for gender inequality and empower future female sports reporters.
Faculty Steve Chen is a professor of sport management at Morehead State University. Monica Larson is associate professor of communication at Shepherd University.
Student Tess Hyre was a senior student of communication at Shepherd University at the time of the research and has graduated.
Funding

( 15 )

Recorded at: 10/19/2018 back to top
Title Reading to Learn or Learning to Read? Engaging College Students in Course Readings.
Citation College Teaching. 2017; 65:1:28–31. doi: 10.1080/87567 555.2016.1222577. Kerr MM, Frese KM. University of Pittsburgh
Description Despite instructors’ belief that class readings are integral to the learning process, only 20-30 percent of undergraduate students complete required readings. Failure to complete course reading has been associated with declines in exam and research performance. This paper first offers a brief review of the literature on why students do not complete course readings: (1) unpreparedness, (2) lack of motivation, (3) time constraints, and (4) an underestimation of reading importance. We then identify approaches that encourage students to read, enjoy reading, and develop metacognitive knowledge, shown to improve learning.
Faculty Mary Margaret Kerr is professor of psychology in education at University of Pittsburgh.
Student Kristen M. Frese completed this work as a project during summer 2016. She is now in a doctoral program at the University of Maryland.
Funding

( 16 )

Recorded at: 2/6/2018 back to top
Title Rural Children's Responses to the Flight 93 Crash on September 11, 2001
Citation Journal of Rural Mental Health. 2017. doi: 10.1037/rmh0000072. Kerr MM, Fried SE, Price RH, Cornick C, Dugan S. University of Pittsburgh.
Description This article discusses recently discovered letters written by 76 sixth graders from two nearby schools days after terrorists crashed United Flight 93 into a field in rural Western Pennsylvania. The letters from the school closest to the crash revealed children’s recollections of the day, coping strategies, and community pride. Letters from the school farther away from the crash reflected children’s gratitude and empathy for the recovery workers at the crash site, with fewer recollections of the day. Findings provide insight on the rural children’s reactions to terrorism and suggest new methods of documenting their perspectives, interactions, and roles after a disaster.
Faculty Mary Margaret Kerr is professor of administrative and policy studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Rebecca H. Price is a graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh.
Student At the time of the research, Sara E. Fried was an undergraduate in applied developmental psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is now a PsyD student at Chestnut Hill College. Corey Cornick is now a graduate student in school psychology at the University of Houston, and Sarah Dugan lives in Pittsburgh.
Funding

( 17 )

Recorded at: 2/6/2018 back to top
Title The Cost of Stability: Consumption-Based Fixed Rate Billing for Water Utilities
Citation Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education. 2017; 160: 5-24. doi: 10.111/j.1936-704X.2017.03237.x. Schmidt A, Lewis L. Bates College
Description Municipal water utilities in the United States face the challenge of balancing the potentially conflicting goals of sending signals about water scarcity and maintaining revenue stability. Times of extreme shortage such as the recent extended drought in California seriously challenge and can jeopardize this delicate balance. Mandatory or voluntary conservation strategies can be detrimental to revenue stability. This study explored the ability of the Consumption-Based Fixed Rates (CBFR) pricing method to solve this dual dilemma of scarcity pricing and revenue stability in both normal times and times of drought. Using simulations comparing current pricing mechanisms with the CBFR, We found that the latter solves the revenue problem but creates greater problems with equity and scarcity versus the former.
Faculty Lynne Lewis is the Elmer W. Campbell Professor of Economics and a member of the Program in Environmental Studies at Bates College.
Student Amy Schmidt graduated from Bates College with a major in environmental studies and a concentration in environmental economics in 2015. She began the research as a full-year senior thesis project in 2014 and continued work toward this publication into summer 2015. She now lives in Longmont, CO, and is studying toward a master's degree in education, with the aim of teaching statistics at the high school level.
Funding Support for this project was provided by the Blanchard Fund for Student-Faculty Research in Economics, Bates College.

( 18 )

Recorded at: 9/29/2017 back to top
Title State Variation in Certain Rules Governing Expert Witness Testimony
Citation Journal of Legal Economics., 2016; 23: 1:61-70, Horan K, and Schap D.. College of the Holy Cross
Description State statutory laws differ relative to four federal rules that govern expert witness testimony in federal courts. The state variation is classified as of mid-2016 and presented in tabular form. The tables show (a) state practices consistent with one or more of the federal rules; and (b) common and less common departures from the federal rules.
Faculty David Schap is professor of economics.
Student Kayla Horan, Holy Cross Class of 2018, participated in the research as a research assistant and coauthor during summer 2016. Horan spent fall 2016 as an academic intern at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and has now returned to her studies at Holy Cross.
Funding The Office of the Dean at Holy Cross provided funding for summer research in 2016.

( 19 )

Recorded at: 4/6/2017 back to top
Title An Agricultural Harvest Knowledge Survey to Distinguish Types of Expertise
Citation Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 2016; 60: 1:2048-2052, Meusel C, Grimm C, Gilbert S, Leucke G. Iowa State University
Description This work describes an agricultural harvest knowledge survey that was created for user research studies that observed experienced combine operators driving a combine simulator in virtual crop fields. Based on the success of this survey as a population segmentation tool, the authors recommend three criteria for the design of future knowledge surveys in other domains: (1) use real-world scenarios, (2) ensure question are neither too difficult nor too easy, and (3) ask the minimum number of questions to identify operator knowledge successfully. Future research aims to create a tool that can discern between system experts (with deep understanding of the system) and practice experts (who primarily have the wisdom of experience).
Faculty Stephen Gilbert is an assistant professor of industrial engineering. Greg Leucke is an associate professor in mechanical engineering.
Student Chase Meusel is currently a PhD student in human computer interaction (HCI) at Iowa State Unversity. Chase Grimm is currently a third-year undergraduate in industrial engineering at Iowa State University.
Funding The research was funded by John Deere.

( 20 )

Recorded at: 4/6/2017 back to top
Title Antropólogo militante, pesquisador e/ou sujeito de estudo?
Citation Revista Antropologías del Sur, 2015; 1: 3:69-85, Virgilio, J. Federal University of Santa Catarina, New University of Lisbon
Description This paper refers to reflections produced after conducting fieldwork about Portuguese student demonstrations that happened between 2012 and 2013. It suggests a revision and reconstruction of methodological preconceptions while performing fieldwork in anthropology. It produces a theoretical review regarding research and activism in contemporary anthropology and opens a dialogue with what is observed in the field.
Faculty
Student Jefferson Virgílio is a PhD candidate at Lisbon University and conducted this research as an undergraduate at Federal University of Santa Catarina in Brazil.
Funding The research was supported by three Brazilian funds: FAPESC, CAPES and CNPq

( 21 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016 back to top
Title Smartphone Diffusion and Consumer Price Comparison Shopping Behavior: Implications for the Marketplace Fairness Act
Citation Economics Bulletin, 2016; 36: 3:1337-1353, Li I, Babajanova G, Tuomala M, Simonson RD. Minnesota State University Mankato
Description Taxation of e-commerce sales is a contested issue with a potentially large impact on sales tax revenue collected by local and state governments. We examine the impact of Nexus and effective online sales taxes on smartphone-assisted online purchases. We estimate that smartphone consumers are 6% more likely to comparison shop and 74% less likely to purchase from an online retailer if they live in a state with a Nexus sales tax. The implied tax elasticity of online purchases (6.8) is significantly higher than comparable recent estimates. These results suggest that local and state government forecasts of online sales tax revenue under the Marketplace Fairness Act legislation may be lower than previous estimates.
Faculty Ishuan Li is associate professor of economics, and Robert Simonson is professor of economics.
Student Guncha Babajanova is employed and is applying to PhD programs in finance and economics. Matthew Tuomala is an analyst at Reeher LLC.
Funding

( 22 )

Recorded at: 9/28/2016 back to top
Title Institutional Constraints Limiting Social Services for Immigrants
Citation Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies, 2016; 14: 2:156-176, Browne S, Glass C, Holyoak G.. Utah State University
Description The study identifies the factors that constrain the resource provision activities of social service agencies for immigrants in Utah. Drawing on twenty-five in-depth interviews with the state’s social service providers, we found that despite providers’ commitment to serving immigrants, organizations remain significantly constrained due primarily to external coercive constraints including restrictive state laws and increasing competition over limited funding.
Faculty Christy Glass is a professor of sociology, and Shannon Browne is an assistant professor of social work.
Student Grant Holyoak was a junior majoring in sociology and economics when he participated in the project as an undergraduate research fellow. He is currently employed by a social service agency in Utah and will begin the next stage of his education in 2017.
Funding N/A

( 23 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title "The Ukrainian Shatterbelt: A New Cold War?"
Citation Report dell'IsAg. Published by the Istituto di Alti Studi in Geopolitica e Scienze of Rome, Italy., 2014; 1: 30:Jalilov, M and Kelly, P.. Emporia State University, Emporia, KS
Description A "shatterbelt" is a region in conflict where outside larger states have entered to take sides in the strife. This vertical and horizontal structure defines a shatterbelt. The authors found this concept fits the current Ukrainian crisis. Six possible outcomes are presented; the authors predict the Russian intervention could prolong the structure well into the future, with Putin's ability to orchestrate the level of violence to his satisfaction.
Faculty Department of Social Sciences - Political Science; Phil Kelly is Professor of Political Science
Student Murad Jalilov originates from Azerbaijan and is presently a freshman student at Emporia State University of Kansas. He and Professor Kelly won an undergraduate research grant for summer 2014. Working in close unison, we research and wrote a manuscript than was published as a Report by the "Istituto di Alti Studi in Geopolitica e Scienze, a geopolitical think tank of Rome, Italy.
Funding Summer undergraduate/faculty research grant via Emporia State University of Kansas

( 24 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title A Neo-Weberian Review Of The Criminal Courts: How The Bureaucratic State Creates Injustice
Citation Center For Scholastic Inquiry Journal of Behavioral Sciences 2014; 3: 23-41., 2014; 3: 3:23-41, Smith, S., Lanza-Kaduce, L., and Fockler, C.. Stetson University
Description This study combines Ritzer’s Neo-Weberian approach (2004) with Jurisprudence authorship (mainly Litowitz 2005) to derive a proposed model explaining how bureaucratic size affects judge decision making. The well-documented pathologies that bureaucracy creates (i.e. ritualism, limiting the rationality of the bureaucratic actor, dehumanization) are discussed and are accounted for in the model. The model is operationalized and tested with performance check-sheets (n=420) reviewing judge professional behavior across six different courthouses varying in size from smallest to largest. The data is analyzed using linear regression; the results suggest support for the model.
Faculty Sven Smith is an assistant professor of Sociology. Lonn Lanza-Kaduce is a professor of Law and Society.
Student Carly Fockler is an English major that is applying to law schools.
Funding N/A

( 25 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title Rationales Concerning the Treatment of Federal Income Taxes in Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Litigation in the State Courts
Citation Journal of Legal Economics., 2014; 21: 1:85-117, Guest L, Schap D.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Awards of damages in certain tort cases are exempt from federal income taxes. Some state courts adjust awards in recognition of the tax advantage, while others do not. Based on a comprehensive survey of judicial reasoning in the various state courts, the study categorizes the varied rationales for the differing tax treatments and rationales as to whether juries ought to be instructed in the matter of taxes.
Faculty David Schap is Professor of Economics.
Student Lauren Guest is Holy Cross Class of 2013 and worked on the project as a research assistant during the summers of 2012 and 2013 as well as part of directed research courses in fall semester 2012 and spring semester 2013. Lauren now works for software startup company Trio Health, whose software tracks patient data for various chronic diseases.
Funding A grant from the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust supported the summer research in 2012, and the Office of the Dean at Holy Cross funded the summer 2013 research.

( 26 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title The Consequences of Overstating Fuel Economy
Citation The American Economist., 2015; 60: 1:52-62, Beck C, Schap D.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Economic analysis of law is applied to a series of theoretical variations of contract breach arising out of a factual case in which Hyundai Motor Co. overstated the fuel economy of its Elantra model. The variations present opportunities to bring to the fore the economic underpinnings of doctrines and norms suitable for setting damages in cases of contract breach.
Faculty David Schap is Professor of Economics.
Student Corey Beck is Holy Cross Class of 2013 and began the research as a term project in the course Law and Economics in fall 2012, developing it further during spring 2013 and jointly with her coauthor during summer 2014. Corey now works as an Investment Analyst in the Investment Office at Memorial Sloan Kettering, conducting performance analysis and investment due diligence.
Funding

( 27 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title Overeducation and Employment Mismatch: Wage Penalties for College Degrees in Business
Citation Journal of Education for Business, 2014; 0: 1-7, Li I, Malvin M, Simonson RD.. Minnesota State University, Mankato
Description This study examined incidence of over-education and the associated market wage penalty across business related college majors in the United States. The study examined data from the American Community Survey (2010). The data showed wage penalty for over-educated college graduates varied significantly across business majors by gender. Controlling for age, experience, industry and occupation, the penalty for most over-educated business majors to vary between 4% to 14%. Over-educated female graduates with business degrees suffered lower wage penalty compared to over-educated females in other majors.
Faculty Ihsuan Li is an associate professor of economics. Robert Simonson is professor of economics.
Student Mathew Malvin is currently in a master program in urban planning at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Mathew undertook the study in his senior research seminar capstone course.
Funding

( 28 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title Models for aggression by police officers to romantic partners and police partners
Citation International Journal of Police Science and Management., 2013; 15: 4:272-280, Can, S. H., Hendy M. H., Imbody, M.. Penn State University - Schuylkill
Description The purpose of the present study was to enhance understanding of police aggression in close relationships by comparing “models” of aggression suggested by Social Learning Theory including powerful others or peers from the "home family" (father, mother, siblings) and from the "police family" (supervisor, police partner). Participants included 120 police officers, who completed anonymous questionnaires to report aggression in each relationship using the 12-item Revised Conflict Tactics Scale. Multiple regression revealed that the set of "home family" and "police family" models of aggression explained 35.5% of the variance in romantic partner aggression and 59.1% of the variance in police partner aggression reported by officers, with aggression from the father and the police supervisor being the most significant models of aggression.
Faculty S. Hakan Can is an associate professor of criminal justice and Helen Hendy is professor of Psychology.
Student Meaghan Imbody was senior in Administration of Justice major, participated in the research for independent study credit. Meaghan is currently in the process to become Pennsylvania State Trooper.
Funding Penn State’s Faculty and Student Research Endowment grant supported the research.

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Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title Knowledge of the LGBTQ Community and Opinion on Same-Sex Marriage
Citation Epistimi, 2014; 8: 31-39, Hodge B, Newberry C.. Capital University
Description This study measured how opinions on same-sex marriage are formed. It also investigated whether different sources of knowledge pertaining to the LGBTQ community yield different perspectives. The results show that political party, family values, TV and online news outlets, and personally knowing someone who identifies as LGBTQ significantly influences one’s opinion on same-sex marriage.
Faculty Suzanne Marilley is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Capital University.
Student Brittany Hodge is a recent graduate of Capital University (2014) with a degree in Political Science and Public Administration and a minor in Philosophy. She is now employed and is pursuing graduate programs. Carolyn Newberry is a senior majoring in Public Administration with minors in Management, Organizational Communication, and Political Science.
Funding

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Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title The Crepuscule of the Russian Gas Oligopoly.
Citation Natural Gas Europe., 2014; 1: 7:Uribe, GA. SIT Study Abroad; Switzerland: International Studies and Multilateral Diplomacy.
Description The research looks at how the geopolitics of natural gas supply and demand in the European Union has forced a policy of energy diversification for the sake of energy security, and what this means for the future of energy geopolitics on the continent especially with respect to Russia.
Faculty Although not co-authors, this student’s research was overseen by Gyula Csurgai, PhD; and Alexandre Lambert, PhD of SIT Study Abroad, a program of World Learning.
Student This article grew out of an independent study project that Gabriel undertook during the spring 2014 semester of an SIT Study Abroad program in Geneva, Switzerland, called Switzerland: International Studies and Multilateral Diplomacy. Gabriel is currently a candidate for a B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in Security Policy and Middle East Studies, with a minor in History at The Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University in Washington DC.
Funding Gabriel’s independently-funded research was supported by staff and faculty at several think tanks and universities including Sciences Po in Paris, Free University of Brussels, and The George Washington University

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Recorded at: 3/7/2016 back to top
Title Wage Net Discount Rates: 1981-2012
Citation Journal of Forensic Economics., 2014; 25: 2:153-174, Schap D, Baumann R, Guest L.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Time series properties of wage net discount rates are derived using three short-term interest rates. The three 1981-2012 series are found to be trend stationary, suitable for short-term forecasting. Two endogenously determined sub-series starting 1990:12 and 1994:05 exhibit stationary attributes about positive constants (not statistically different from zero), suitable for long-term forecasting
Faculty David Schap is Professor of Economics and Robert Baumann is Associate Professor of Economics.
Student Lauren Guest is Holy Cross Class of 2013 and worked on the project as a research assistant during the summer of 2013 as well as part of directed research courses in fall semester 2012 and spring semester 2013. Lauren now works for software startup company Trio Health, whose software tracks patient data for various chronic diseases.
Funding The Office of the Dean at Holy Cross provided funding for summer 2013 research.

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Recorded at: 2/27/2015 back to top
Title The Development of Integrated Terrestrial and Marine Pathways in the Argo-Saronic Region, Greece
Citation Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 2014; 41: 4:379-390, Newhard JML, Levine NS, Phebus AD.. College of Charleston
Description This study looks at a method of modeling pathways that integrates major factors (land, sea, and culture) that would be in play while considering medium- to long-distance travel in the Aegean. This test case explores the possible relationships between proposed routes for communication and identified coastal sites with parameters modeled in geographic information system that affect travel in cultural, marine, and terrestrial contexts.
Faculty James Newhard is Director of Archaeology and Associate Professor of Classics. Norm Levine is Associate Professor of Geology and Environmental Geosciences and Director of the Santee-Cooper GIS Laboratory.
Student Angelina Phebus received her MA in Classics in 2013 from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and currently teaches at McLaughlin Elementary School on Standing Rock Reservation.
Funding Research was support by a research grant from the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs and the Classical Archaeology Fund from the College of Charleston.

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Title Walking the Walk: Conceptual Foundations of the Sustainable Personality
Citation Journal of Cleaner Production., 2014; 8: 12:Pappas, E., Pappas, J. Sweeney, D.. James Madison University
Description Systems Theory in sustainability studies has normally not extended beyond environmental, economic, and social contexts. The role of the individual is critical to the success of sustainability efforts across other contexts. Sustainably Personality explores the fundamental conceptual foundations for sustainable behavior and the role of the individual in environmental, social, and economic sustainability. In particular, the challenge of empowering individuals to align their behaviors with their admirable values is explored.
Faculty Eric Pappas is a Professor of Integrated Science and Technology
Student Devon Sweeney graduated in May 2014. She worked on this project under a National Science Foundation grant (E. Pappas, PI)
Funding This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant EEC #1158728 (E. Pappas, PI).

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Title A projection of economic impact and benefits of a proposed tail system.
Citation KAHPERD Journal, 2014; 51: 2:58-71, Chen S, Mason ND, Cooper SC, Miller A.. Morehead State University
Description The purpose of this feasibility study was to justify the rationales for constructing the Dewey Lake Trail System (DLTS) with public funding. According to responses of 119 visitors of Jenny Wiley Festival, the majority (92%) of the respondents favored the idea of building the trail system. Results also suggested the trail project may generate an annual economic impact of $1.7M to Floyd County, KY and attracts many to engage in fishing, walking/hiking, camping, horseback riding, and cultural festivals and events. The building of the DLTS would be an ideal, feasible and profitable endeavor to pursue.
Faculty Steve Chen is an associate professor of sport management.
Student Nicholas Mason is a senior sport management major, who has participated in the study as an Undergraduate Research Fellow. Nicholas is currently in a substitute at a middle school in Ohio.
Funding The project was supported by the Office of Center for Regional Engagement of Morehead State University.

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Title Burnout and Death Anxiety in Hospice Social Workers
Citation Journal of Social Work in End-Of-Life & Palliative Care, 2014; 10: 3:219-239, Quinn-Lee L, Olson-McBride L, Unterberger A.. University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Description The purpose of this study was threefold: determine the prevalence of burnout and death anxiety among hospice social workers; examine associations between burnout and death anxiety; and explore the factors which may contribute to the development of death anxiety and burnout. Participants completed four items: the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), the Death Anxiety Questionnaire (DAQ), a demographic questionnaire, and a set of open-ended questions. Three key themes emerged: (a) personal interest in hospice social work developed a variety of ways; (b) although death anxiety decreased from exposure and understanding of the death process, there was increased death anxiety surrounding working with certain patients; and (c) burnout was primarily related to workload or difficult cases.
Faculty Dr. Lisa Quinn-Lee is an assistant professor in social work. Dr. Leah Olson-McBride is an associate professor in social work.
Student April Unterberger is a senior social work student graduating in December 2014.
Funding

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Title Undergraduate Internship Expectations: Strategic Encouragement of Student Involvement
Citation Student Pulse., 2013; 5: 12:Burns, M.K., Aitkenhead, J., Frederick, C.M., & Huddy, S.. Sierra Nevada College
Description The current study examined internship participation at the undergraduate level. Undergraduates were randomly sampled and questioned about their participation in internships via an electronic survey and focus groups. Self report results showed undergraduates were interested in internships given expected benefits (e.g., skill development, workforce preparation, etc.) but did not always follow through with participation given the presence of hurdles (e.g., relevance to major, time commitment, etc.).
Faculty Christina M. Frederick, Ph.D., is the Psychology Program Chair at Sierra Nevada College (SNC). Shannon Huddy is an Assistant Professor in the Business department at SNC.
Student Margaret K. Burns graduated magna cum laude from SNC, in 2014, with a Bachelors degree in psychology. Margaret is currently working in her field of study prior to graduate school. Jaime Aitkenhead graduated summa cum laude from SNC, in 2013, with a Bachelors degree in business administration. Jaime is currently working with an accounting firm.
Funding This research was conducted during the 2012-2013 school year as a part of an internal grant focused on undergraduate research and was funded by SNC. This work was published in Student Pulse in November of 2013.

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Title Case Law Concerning the Treatment of Federal Income Taxes in Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Litigation in the State Courts
Citation Journal of Legal Economics., 2014; 20: 85-123, Guest, L, and Schap, D.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Awards of damages in certain tort cases are exempt from federal income taxes. Some state courts adjust awards in recognition of the tax advantage, while others make no adjustment. A comprehensive survey of each state’s judicial reasoning in the matter is presented, including opinion as to whether juries ought to be instructed in the matter of taxes.
Faculty David Schap is Professor of Economics.
Student Lauren Guest is Holy Cross Class of 2013 and worked on the project as a research assistant during the summers of 2012 and 2013 as well as part of directed research courses in fall semester 2012 and spring semester 2013. Lauren now works for software startup company Trio Health, whose software tracks patient data for various chronic diseases.
Funding A grant from the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust supported the summer research component in 2012.

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Recorded at: 7/9/2014 back to top
Title Smoothing the Transition to Adulthood: Creating Ongoing Supportive Relationships among Foster Youth
Citation Children and Youth Services Review., 2014; 37: 1-8, Nesmith A, Christophersen K.. University of St. Thomas
Description Foster youth who age-out of the system are at high risk of serious negative outcomes after transitioning to adulthood, with few empirically-tested interventions to address the problem. This study assessed the effectiveness of a model that engages the youth social networks and is focused on youth empowerment. In a sample of 88 foster youth, those exposed to the model felt more empowered, had a wider variety of supportive adults, and could better regulate their emotions than those in a comparison group
Faculty Ande Nesmith is an assistant professor of social work.
Student Kaitlin Christophersen is a senior,double-majoring in social work and Spanish at the University of St. Thomas. She conducted the research over the last two years as a research assistant.
Funding This research was supported by Family Alternatives, Inc.

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Title Late Acheulean technology and cognition at Boxgrove, UK
Citation Journal of Archaeological Science, 2014; 41: 576-590, Stout D, Apel J, Commander J, Roberts M.. Emory University
Description This study examined ancient (500,000 years old) stone tools from the site of Boxgrove in order to draw inferences about the skill, understanding, and cognitive capacities of pre-modern (Homo heidelbergensis) tool-makers. Qualitative and quantitative (size and shape) attributes of the Boxgrove artifacts were compared to the experimental products of modern inexperienced, novice and expert stone tool-makers. Results demonstrate the expert application of relatively complex tool-making techniques at Boxgrove and have implications for understanding the neurocognitive substrates, social transmission, and spatiotemporal distribution this pre-human technology.
Faculty Dietrich Stout is an assistant professor of anthropology.
Student Julia Commander participated in this research as a volunteer for several years in my lab including one year (Fall 2011 – Spring 2012) as a Scholarly Inquiry and Research at Emory (SIRE) Research Partner. Julia was an anthropology major who graduated in 2013. She has held internships at the Hirshhorn and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, and is currently applying to graduate programs in Museum Conservation.
Funding This research was funded by the European Union project HANDTOMOUTH and by research grants from the Wenner-Gren and Leakey Foundations awarded to Dr. Stout.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014 back to top
Title Self-selection and variations in the laboratory measurement of other-regarding preferences across subject pools: evidence from one college student and two adult samples
Citation 2013; Vol 16, Issue 2, pp. 170-189, Anderson J, Burks SV, Carpenter J, Goette L, Maurer K, Nosenzo D, Potter R, Rocha K, Rustichini A. University of Minnesota, Morris (UMM)
Description This study measures the willingness of subjects to behave “pro-socially” by benefiting an anonymous other at a net personal material cost in a standard behavioral economics experiment. We examine three subject pools: self-selected college students, self-selected adults (townspeople), and non-self-selected adults (trainee truckers). We find that neither self selection nor “approval seeking” affect the aggregate proportion of pro-social behaviors among adults, and that students are distinctively different from adults in that they have a much lower incidence of pro-sociality. This suggests that the use of self-selected college student samples does not cause pro-sociality to be overestimated.
Faculty Jon Anderson is a professor of statistics at UMMStephen Burks is an associate professor of economics and management at UMMLorenz Goette is a professor of economics at the University of LausanneDaniele Nosenzo is a lecturer at the University of NottinghamAldo Rustichini is a professor of economics at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Student Karsten Maurer (UMM ’09) is a doctoral student in statistics at Iowa State UniversityRuth Potter (UMM ’13) is employed in healthcare services. Kim Rocha (UMM ’11) is a employed at an engineering firm serving the telecommunications industry.
Funding Support was from the MacArthur Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, the Trucking Industry Program (Georgia Tech), the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, the Leverhulme Trust, the University of Nottingham, and UMM.

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Title An examination of behavioral data and testing scores as indicators of student-athletes’ academic success.
Citation KAHPERD, 2013; 51: 1:34-43, Chen S, Mason N, Middleton S, Salazar W.. Morehead State University
Description The researchers examined behavioral data and testing scores of 186 NCAA Division-I student-athletes to verify the best indicators of student-athletes’ academic performance for balancing academic achievement and athletic participation. It was found that participants’ academic performance (grade point average) was found to be positively correlated (p < .01; Pearson r = .497) with the time spent attending classes and studying, and negatively correlated with the time spent in competition and practice and leisure activities (p < .01; Pearson r = -.357). The results showed the importance of balancing student-athletes’ academic and athletic life. The researchers provided further discussion and practical suggestions on how to work with student-athletes concerning this conundrum.
Faculty Steve Chen is an associated professor of Management and Marketing, Morehead State University
Student Nick Mason is currently a Senior of Morehead State University’s Sport Management program. Nick has been an undergraduate research fellow for the last three years working with his mentor, Steve Chen.
Funding The project was funded by the Center for Regional Engagement of Morehead State University

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Title Student-athletes' perceptions and concerns regarding the use of social network media.
Citation The NCAAHPERD Journal, 2013; 48: 1:30-43, Chen S, Snyder S, Worrell E, Tater SA.. Morehead State University
Description This study examined 218 student-athletes’ perceptions (males = 114, females = 104) about the use of social networking media (SNM) for the purpose of identifying effective strategies for regulating this innovative communication tool. The self-developed questionnaire basing on the literature review covered four major aspects: (a) demographic information, (b) general perceptions on the use of SNM, (c) ratings on the perceived benefits of SNM, and (d) the athletes’ acceptance of those who are invited to their social networking circle. The results indicated that the two best predictors of the participants’ overall satisfaction toward the use of SNM were “use-pattern and behavior” and “social and marketing function.” Four practical strategies for monitoring athletes’ SNM usage were suggested.
Faculty Steve Chen is an associated professor of Management and Marketing, Morehead State University
Student Both Evan Worrell and Stephanie Teater are graduates of Morehead State University’s Sport Management program. They also both worked with their mentor, Steve Chen, as undergraduate research fellows. Stephanie is currently pursuing a law degree. Evan is a sales representative of a sport apparels company in Lexington, Kentucky.
Funding

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Title Articulation rate: Effects of age, fluency, and syntactic structure.
Citation Revista de Logopedia, Foniatría y Audiología., 2013; 33: 55-63, McKee C, McDaniel D, Garrett, MF, Lozoraitis C, Mutterperl, MS.. University of Arizona and University of Southern Maine
Description This study reports findings on articulation rates in children (3 to 8;11) and adults. It showed (1) adult rates were faster than child rates, (2) dysfluency affected the rate of the fluent parts of the utterance differently in children and adults, and (3) rates for relative and conjoined clause structures differed from each other and across age groups. This suggests development in the sentence planning system.
Faculty Cecile McKee (U of A) and Dana McDaniel (USM) are professors of linguistics, and Merrill F. Garrett (U of A) is a professor of psychology.
Student Cheri Lozoraitis was a senior linguistics major at USM, who is currently in the process of applying to graduate programs. Matt Mutterperl is a senior double major in linguistics and psychology at the U of A. Both students participated in the research for independent study credit.
Funding Partial support for this research was provided by National Science Foundation grants BCS-0822558 and BCS-0822457 to McKee, Garrett, and McDaniel. This included an REU supplement to fund Cheri’s participation.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014 back to top
Title Total Offset and Medical Net Discount Rates: 1981-2012
Citation Journal of Forensic Economics, 2013; 24: 2:191-204, Schap, D, Guest, L, Kraynak, A.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Medical net discount rates (MNDRs) are calculated based on the medical Consumer Price Index and using annual percentage yields on various U.S. Treasury securities of short duration. Stationarity and other time-series properties are tested for each series. The somewhat mixed results are more supportive of “total offset” (i.e., a zero MNDR) than previously published research findings have been.
Faculty David Schap is Professor of Economics.
Student Lauren Guest is Holy Cross Class of 2013 and began work on the project as a research assistant during summer 2012 and continued her participation as part of directed research courses in fall semester 2012 and spring semester 2013. Lauren now works for Trio Health, whose software tracks patient data for various chronic diseases. Andrew Kraynak is Holy Cross Class of 2012 and initiated the research as part of his Economics Department honors thesis research during fall semester 2011 and continued the work as part of a directed research project during spring semester 2012. Andrew is now a U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Officer.
Funding A grant from the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust supported the summer research component in 2012.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013 back to top
Title Developing a Student Employee Leadership Program: The Importance of Evaluating Effectiveness
Citation Recreational Sports Journal., 2013; 37: 1:2-13, Tingle JK, Cooney C, Asbury SE, Tate S.. Trinity University
Description This study examined the effectiveness of a leadership development program using a quasi-experimental design. Data were collected in two phases and measured the growth of each student’s leadership capabilities as reported using the Student Leadership Practices Inventory. Results revealed that the level of intervention significantly affected growth in the student’s leadership capacity. As campus recreation programs are increasingly required to quantify their impact, the results of this study can be useful for both practitioners and researchers. Specifically, the findings indicate that meaningful growth transpires only when leadership lessons are imparted using an long-term approach.
Faculty Jacob K. Tingle is an assistant professor of the practice in the school of business and the director of the sport management minor. Seth E. Asbury is an associate athletic director at Trinity and Sheldon Tate is an assistant director of campus recreation at Texas Christian University.
Student Christina Cooney was a student researcher for two years with Jacob Tingle in her role as a McNair Scholar at Trinity. She graduated in May 2013 and is currently pursing an MBA in management at Metropolitan University in Denver, CO.
Funding

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Title Examining recycling container attributes and household recycling practices.
Citation Resources, Conservation and Recycling., 2013; 75: 32-40, Lane G, Wagner TP.. University of Southern Maine
Description This paper examined the influence of the attributes of recycling containers on recycling rates, participation rates, and set-out rates. As communities spend considerable sums on containers, and likely have only one opportunity, it is crucial to know what attributes (e.g., size, shape, color, mobility, convenience, etc.) can maximize the amount of recyclables collected. The study found that the major positive attributes were larger containers and wheeled containers.
Faculty Travis Wagner is an associate professor of environmental science and policy.
Student Gordon Lane was an undergraduate student majoring in environmental science. He began work on this project in 2011 as a work study student. I was able to use some of my funds from a professional develop award to support Gordon as a research assistant. In recognition of his amazing work, I made him first author. Gordon is currently employed full time in the field and has expressed interest in going to graduate school in the future.
Funding There was no dedicated funding for this research.

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Title Historical Net Discount Rates: Amended and Reinterpreted
Citation Journal of Legal Economics., 2012; 19: 1:17-36, Kraynak A, Schap D.. College of the Holy Cross
Description Historical wage and medical net discount rate series of the kind previously published are truncated for sake of consistency with the circa 1980 Federal Reserve policy shift and revised to reflect US Supreme Court admonitions regarding best forensic economic practice. The implications of the newly reported series for applied forensic economic work are discussed.
Faculty David Schap is professor of economics.
Student Andrew Kraynak, Holy Cross Class of 2012, began the research as a research assistant during summer 2011 and completed it as part of a directed research project during spring 2012. Andrew currently is training in the US Navy SEAL program.
Funding A grant from the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust supported the summer research component.

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Title A geoinformatic approach to the collection of archaeological survey data
Citation Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 2013; 40: 1:3-17, Newhard JML, Levine NS, Phebus AD, Littlefield J, Craft S.. College of Charleston
Description This paper explores the integration of GIS technology with archaeological survey, focusing on two case studies from central Anatolia. The methodology allows for expediency and accuracy in data recording, enabling refined analyses of anthropogenic and environmental phenomena.
Faculty Newhard is associate professor of classics; Levine is associate professor of geology.
Student Phebus is completing an MA in classical archaeology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Littlefield is in doctoral program in anthropology and member of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University. Craft is a doctoral student in archaeology in the Joukowsky Institute for the Ancient World, Brown University.
Funding Research was supported by Summer Undergraduate Research with Faculty (SURF) awards and grants from the Faculty R&D Committee and the School of Languages, Cultures, and World Affairs, College of Charleston

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Title The Use of an iPad to Promote Kindergartners' Alphabet Recognition and Letter Sound Correspondence
Citation Practically Primary., 2013; 18: 1:24-26, Huang SH, Clark N, Wedel W.. Midwestern State University
Description This study employed a case study method to investigate effectiveness of the iPad’s application that fosters literacy development and learning for struggling readers at the primary grade. Two kindergarten students, who have been diagnosed as struggling readers and as having ADHD, participate in tutoring sessions over the course of the semester. The researchers worked with each student individually on a weekly basis using the iPad’s software applications, such as the ABC Matching game, Alphabet Learn, Alphabet Tracing, and ABC Go Go, etc. By the end of the semester, both students were able to identify the letters of the alphabet, and to distinguish the differences between letters and sounds by hearing, seeing, playing, and writing letters and words in meaningful ways.
Faculty SuHua Huang is an assistant professor of reading education at Midwestern State University.
Student Nicole Clark and Whitney Wedel participated in this project in the spring, 2012. Both of them are currently employed as classroom teachers in Wichita Falls, Texas.
Funding The research project was supported by the West College of Education of Midwestern State University.

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Title 'Difficult to Repair': Applying African Models for Transitional Justice to Peace and Restoration Prospects in the DRC
Citation African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review., 2013; 1: 3:56-82, Klosterboer B, Hartmann-Mahmud L.. Centre College
Description This paper highlights the limits of applying macro-level peace and reconciliation strategies to the Congolese situation and asserts that political, economic, and social cleavages at the local level continue to fuel national instability. The study draws on African experiences of transitional justice in Sierra Leone and Rwanda to offer specific lessons on how institutions at multiple levels of analysis can work together to foster peace and accountability.
Faculty Lori Hartmann-Mahmud is the Hower Associate Professor of International Studies
Student Brian Klosterboer is the primary author of this article. He conducted the research throughout the year 2011-12 for his senior thesis project with support from the John C. Young scholars program at Centre College. Brian is currently in Uganda on a Fulbright Research Grant, studying the relationship between the media and peace-building.
Funding The John C. Young program supports senior research for a small number of highly qualified students (usually 6-10 per year), of which Brian was one in 2011-12.

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Title Exploring Perceptions and Intentions of Code-Switching Among Bilingual Spanish-English Speakers
Citation Proceedings of the National Conference of Undergraduate Research 2013, 2013; 1: Cooper, GF. Eastern Washington University
Description The United States is an increasingly multilingual place and this research explores how bilingual and multilingual speakers mix languages when they communicate, a process called code-switching. By conducting a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews it examines perceptions and understandings of code-switching in bilingual English-Spanish communication in the Inland Northwest. As a whole, this study suggests that views of code-switching, particularly Spanish-English code-switching are changing rapidly within the United States.
Faculty Dr. Julia Smith is a full professor of Anthropology.
Student Grace Fay Cooper began this research in the summer of 2012 as a McNair Scholar at Eastern Washington University. She is currently working on finishing her two undergraduates degrees in Anthropology and Spanish. Grace plans to pursue her PhD and continue her research through graduate school.
Funding This research was funded by the Tiro Ronald E. McNair Scholars Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program at Eastern Washington University

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Title Teacher influence on book selection of third grade students
Citation Georgia Journal of Reading, 2012; 35: 1:24-28, Delony S, Hathorn K.. Abilene Christian University
Description This comparative study explored the ways that two teachers taught students to select books and the impact of those lessons. Analysis of observation and interview data suggests that students who were taught to select books based on personal interests demonstrated higher levels of self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation to read. Conversely, students who were taught to use external criteria for choosing books demonstrated an external locus of control and relied on external motivation for reading.
Faculty Sheila Delony is an assistant professor of teacher education.
Student Katie Hathorn, a junior elementary education major, was independently motivated to participate in the research project in 2010. Katie is currently teaching first grade in a public elementary school in Texas.
Funding Departmental funding supported the research.

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Title Mobile Classrooms: Using Mobile Devices to Enhance BSW Education
Citation The Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work, 2013; 49: Baldridge SB, McAdams AC, Reed A, Moran A.. Abilene Christian University
Description This study examined and evaluated the use of mobile learning and remote-teaching (teaching content to students outside of traditional face-to-face settings) to that of traditional teaching methods. Using mobile devices and social media, this study examined whether or not social work curriculum could be taught effectively to students outside of static online or classroom environments.
Faculty Stephen Baldridge is the Baccalaureate Social Work Program director and assistant professor.
Student Alex Reed is currently in the baccalaureate program of social work and in the process of applying to graduate school.
Funding The research was funded by an internal mobile research grant at Abilene Christian University.

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Title Una nueva oportunidad en la investigación del Ejército guatemalteco en el Archivo General de Centro América
Citation Mesoamérica., 2012; 54: 126-136, Schlewitz AJ, Fegel HL.. Archivo General de Centro América
Description This essay describes military documents that the Archivo General de Centro América made accessible to the public in 2009, which are largely administrative. The essay also discusses the challenges of working with this collection as well as its promise for researchers interested in reconstructing an institutional history of the Guatemalan military.
Faculty Andrew J. Schlewitz is assistant professor of Latin American Studies
Student Heidi L. Fegel is a senior undergraduate majoring in Spanish and minoring in Latin American Studies. She worked with Dr. Schlewitz in the Archivo General de Centro América as a 'Student Summer Scholar' in 2011. She is currently finishing an Honor's Thesis based on this archival research. After graduating, she plans to earn an MA in Latin American Studies.
Funding Grand Valley State University's Student Summer Scholarship program and its Center for Scholarly and Creative Excellence funded Schlewitz and Fegel's two months of research in Guatemala.

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Title The Impact of Homeschooling on the Adjustment of College Students
Citation International Social Science Review., 2012; 87: 1:19-34, Drenovsky CK, Cohen, I.. Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania
Description This research investigates whether such stereotypes have any lasting effect on students’ adjustment in college. An online survey resulted in a sample of 185 college students from a variety of colleges and universities, both public and private. Results indicate that compared to traditionally educated students, college students who were homeschooled do not have significant differences in self-esteem, and they have significantly lower levels of depression than college students with no homeschooling in their background. This research also revealed that homeschooled students report higher grades in college and they evaluate their entire college experience more positively than traditionally educated students.
Faculty Dr. Cynthia Drenovsky is a professor of sociology at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania.
Student Isaiah Cohen conducted this research in 2011 as part of the requirements for an undergraduate course in sociological survey methodology. He received his B. A. from Shippensburg University in December, 2011 with a major in political science and a minor in sociology. He is currently applying to graduate schools.
Funding Isaiah Cohen received a Shippensburg University Undergraduate Research Grant to fund this project.

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Title The Effect of Monetary Policy on Real Commodity Prices: A Re-examination
Citation The Journal of Economics (MVEA)., 2012; 38: 1:1-21, Thomson AS, Summers PM.. Texas Tech University
Description The paper re-evaluated a recent claim that expansionary monetary policy results in higher inflation-adjusted commodity prices. After addressing several econometric problems in the original study, we found very little evidence of such an effect.
Faculty Peter M Summers was an assistant professor in economics, and is now at High Point University.
Student Amanda Thomson was an Honors student in economics, and graduated in 2010. She is now a law student at the University of Texas at Austin.
Funding The research was supported by an undergraduate research fellowship from the Texas Tech University Honors College, awarded to Amanda.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013 back to top
Title Possibilities and Challenges in Using Children’s Literature to Teach Foreign Languages to Elementary Students
Citation Fourth International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies Proceedings, edited by L. Chova, I. Torres, A. Martínez. Spain: IATED., 2012; 1: Liwanag MPSU, Shuman, M.. State University of New York at Geneseo
Description This article describes using bilingual children 's literature to teach foreign languages to elementary students. Krashen’s (2003) comprehensible input framework provided a structure for bridging foreign language teaching and second language acquisition in a purposeful way. Among the benefits of using children 's literature to teach foreign language includes elementary students understanding and using Spanish and French greetings, basic conversation, simple phrases, and songs while also learning in the company of other children.
Faculty Maria Perpetua Socorro U. Liwanag is an assistant professor of literacy at the Ella Cline Shear School of Education, State University of New York at Geneseo.
Student Marisa Shuman is a Math and Spanish secondary education major at the Ella Cline Shear School of Education. She is student teaching this Fall 2012.
Funding The research was supported by the Geneseo Foundation Undergraduate Research Grant which was awarded to Marisa Shuman.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013 back to top
Title Assessment of the SENCER teaching model at Indiana State University after two years.
Citation Sci Educ Civ Engage: An Intl J., 2012; 4: 1:92-99, Rosene, P.J., Alexander, M.R., Speer, J.H.. Indiana State University
Description We gathered data on our SENCER (Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities) Environmental Science courses for two years. We used SIR data and the Student Assessment of Learning gains from ENVI 110 and ENVI 460 courses. From these data we determined that SENCER has improved student learning at ISU. This article is significant, because it is one of a few data-driven assessments of curriculum change that show real improvement in student learning gains.
Faculty Dr. James Speer is Professor of Geography and Geology in the Dept of Earth and Environmental Systems.
Student Peter Rosene was a Junior then Senior during the research and was a senior when the paper was published. He was working as part of the SENCER Student Leadership Team. His major is Political Science/Pre-Law. He graduated in May 2012 and is currently looking into graduate schools.
Funding This work was mainly funded through the Indiana State University Strategic Plan.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012 back to top
Title Research Experiences for Undergraduates: Student Presenters’ Perceptions of Mentoring and Conference Presentation by Generational Status and Sex
Citation PURM., 2012; 1: 2:Mekolichick J, Bellamy J. Radford University
Description This paper presents the results of an online survey of undergraduates (N = 59) who presented at a regional or national conference, focusing on differences by college generational status and sex. Students found their mentoring and presentational experiences beneficial. Some differences are observed when comparing college generational status and sex.
Faculty Jeanne Mekolichick is associate professor and chair of sociology and director of the Center for Social and Cultural Research
Student Jess Bellamy participated in an independent study project in spring 2011 to conduct this research. She is currently employed a research assistant in the Washington DC area.
Funding The research was supported by a Radford University Faculty Summer Research Award.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012 back to top
Title Assessment of the SENCER Teaching Model at Indiana State University After Two Years
Citation Sci Educ & Civic Engagement: An Intl Jrnl, 2012; 4: 1:92-99, Rosene, PJ, Alexander, MR, and Speer, JH. Indiana State University
Description An ssessment of ISU 's SENCER program in ENVI 110 and ENVI 460 after two years using the SENCER Teaching Model. It ties into many of the goals of the ISU strategic plan from experiential learning to assessment. We found that the SENCER Teaching Model has had made a significant difference in student experience. Student have mostly positive things to say about the courses and the negative statements are often ones that we cannot change such as “Science is hard”. Overall, we conclude that we have been successful engaging undergraduate students with the SENCER Teaching Model and improving their experience in our foundational studies science requirement.
Faculty James H. Speer is a professor of Geography and Geology.
Student Peter Rosene (Junior Political Science and Pre-Law major) completed this work through his position on the SENCER Student Leadership Team. He is graduating with his May. Peter is still deciding what he will do after graduation.
Funding This work was funded through the ISU Strategic Plan and through the national SENCER group through a National Science Foundation CCLI grant.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012 back to top
Title Constructive deviance: striving toward organizational change in healthcare
Citation J Mixed Met. Res., 2010; 5: 1-11, Galperin BL, Robbins, DL.. University of Tampa
Description Constructive deviance is becoming increasingly important in businesses today because constructive deviants can bring about positive changes. Unlike much of the literature on workplace deviance which focuses on dysfunctional behavior such as antisocial behavior and workplace aggression, constructive deviants are employees who break the rules and norms but intend to benefit the organization. These individuals can play a key role in creating an organizational change and serve as future change agents. Given the increasing discussion on health care reforms, our paper explores the factors that relate to constructive deviance among physicians. Finally, practical implications and future research directions are discussed.
Faculty Bella L. Galperin is an Associate Professor of Management and Associate Director of the TECO Energy Center for Leadership at the University of Tampa.
Student Dana L. Robbins completed the paper during her senior year for one of her honor’s tutorial.Dana is currently studying law at Stetson University.
Funding She presented the paper at the Academic and Business Research Institute Conference, which was funded by the John H. Sykes College of Business at the University of Tampa.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012 back to top
Title Exploring Students ' Perceptions of Research in the Learning Environment: A Partnership to Enhance Our Understanding of the Undergraduate Student Experience
Citation 2011; 185-200, Wuetherick B, McLaughlin L.. University of Alberta
Description This book chapter reported on two studies undertaken as a partnership between the Office of the Vice-President Research, represented by the first author, and the U of A Students ' Union, represented by the second author. The two studies explored undergraduate students ' perceptions of research and the role it should play in the undergraduate student learning environment. Arguing for the development of an inclusive, scholarly, knowledge-building community within universities, the findings articulated some of the key challenges faced as we work to embed undergraduate research across the disciplines in higher education.
Faculty Brad Wuetherick is the Program Director of the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness
Student Lisa McLaughlin was the Vice-President Academic for the Students ' Union, and a fourth year student at the University of Alberta when the study was completed. She is now employed as School Health Facilitator with the APPLE schools project with the U of A 's School of Public Health.
Funding The research was funded by the Office of the Vice-President (Research) at the U of A as well as the U of A Students ' Union

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012 back to top
Title
Citation 2011; Erbey R, McLaughlin TF, Derby, KM, Everson M.. Gonzaga University
Description The present research evaluated the use of DI flashcards and reading racetracks on the math and sight word reading performance with three elementary students with learning disabilities. Large improvements were found when DI flashcards and or reading racetracks were employed.
Faculty McLaughlin and Derby are both full professors in the Department of Special Education and worked with Rachel and her master teacher (Everson). Mary Everson works in Spokane Pubic Schools as a special education resource room teacher, who consulted and work on this project in her classroom in Spokane Public Schools.
Student These data were collected by Rachel Erbey in the Spring of 2010 in an elementary resource room and presented as part of the requirements for an Endorsement in Special Education from Gonzaga University and the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the State of Washington. Rachel teaches special education in the in the State of Alaska.
Funding Int. Elect J of El Ed, 2011; 3(3), 213-226. Retrieved from: http://www.iejee.com/index.html

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012 back to top
Title The multiple effects of direct instruction flashcards on sight word acquisition, passage reading, and errors for three middle school students with intellectual disabilities
Citation J Dev and Phys Dis., 2011; 21: 241-255, Ruwe K, McLaughlin TF, Derby KM, Johnson K.. Gonzaga University
Description Three middle school students with intellectual disabilities were taught sight words using DI flashcards. Changes in student performance were shown to be a function of the intervention. In addition, the passage reading data indicated a decreased likelihood that participants would inaccurately read their individual sight words in passage context.
Faculty T. F. McLaughlin and K. Mark Derby are full professors in the Department of Special Education. K. Johnson is a middle school special education teacher in the Spokane Public Schools.
Student K. Ruwe completed this data based project as part of her student teaching in special education. This project was used as documentation of mission of the Department of Special Education to develop preservice special education teachers who serve students with care, competence, and commitment. K Ruwe is currently a special education teacher
Funding

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Title The use of differential reinforcement to decrease the inappropriate verbalizations of a nine-year-old girl with autism.
Citation Elec J Ed Res. In Psych., 2011; 9: 183-196, Thompson M, McLaughlin TF, Derby KM.. Gonzaga University
Description The present case study examined the use of differential reinforcement to reduce the number of inappropriate verbalizations for a single elementary student with autism. The overall outcomes indicated large decreases in inappropriate verbalizations when differential reinforcement was applied across three academic settings. The procedures were seen as highly positive and effective by classroom staff
Faculty T. F. McLaughlin and K. Mark Derby are full professors in the Department of Special Education. K. Johnson is a middle school special education teacher in the Spokane Public Schools.
Student K. Ruwe completed this data based project as part of her student teaching in special education. This project was used as documentation of mission of the Department of Special Education to develop preservice special education teachers who serve students with care, competence, and commitment. K Ruwe is currently a special education teacher in the State of Washington.
Funding

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Title Awareness of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans: A Female Spouse/Intimate Partner Perspective
Citation Military Medicine, 2011; 176: 6:1-9, Buchanan C, Kemppainen J, Smith S, MacKain S, Cox C. University of North Carolina Wilmington
Description The present study examined perspective of female spouses/intimate partners regarding posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in returning Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans. The qualitative study used Flanagan's critical incident technique to obtain reports from participants recruited through a social group for military spouses and a university in southeastern North Carolina. Two-thirds of the participants reported not having received formal education about PTSD. In the event of PTSD treatment resistance, spouses/intimate partners reported they would suggest the need for treatment, issue an ultimatum, take action, or offer patience and support without taking any action.
Faculty Jeanne Kemppainen is the Irwin Belk Distinguished Professor of Nursing.
Student Cassandra Buchanan is currently employed as a staff nurse at Brynn Marr Hospital in Jacksonville, NC.
Funding The research was supported through a Paul E. Hosier Undergraduate Research and Creativity Fellowship from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, which was awarded to Cassandra

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Title Tech tools for teachers, by teachers: Bridging teachers and students.
Citation Wisconsin English Journal., 2011; 53: 1:24-28, Manning C, Brooks W, Crotteau V, Diedrich A, Moser J, and Zwiefelhofer A.. University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Description It is easy to characterize the incorporation of 21st century literacy skills and technology into the classroom as a clash between the old and new. A more constructive approach, however, is to acknowledge the value of both old and new ways used together in order to meet students where they are, helping bring them forward in the technologies they are already using. As we contemplate what it means for students to be literate in the 21st century, we must pay particular attention to how literacy has evolved and continues to evolve. In using innovative tools to approach learning, students and teachers can work together to re-envision how school will function for the century to come.
Faculty Dr. Carmen Manning is an associate professor of English.
Student William Brooks, Vanessa Crotteau, Annelise Diedrich, Jessie Moser, and Amanda Zwiefelhofer are all pre-service students in Education.
Funding