Learning Through Research

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Physics/Astronomy Highlights

Total Listing: 52 (Listed by the order of record adding time, Descending)

( 1 )

Recorded at: 7/24/2017
Title Enhanced Superconductivity in Aluminum-Based Hyperbolic Metamaterials.
Citation Scientific Reports, 2016; 6: 34140. doi:10.1038/srep34140. Smolyaninova VN, Jensen C, Zimmerman W, Prestigiacomo JC, Osofsky MS, Kim H, Bassim N, Xing Z, Qazilbash MM, Smolyaninov II. Towson University, Naval Research Laboratory, College of William & Mary, University of Maryland-College Park
Description One of the most important goals of condensed matter physics is materials by design, i.e. the ability to reliably predict and design materials with a set of desired properties. A striking example is the deterministic enhancement of the superconducting properties of materials. We have engineered an aluminum/aluminum oxide hyperbolic metamaterial capable of a significant enhancement of superconducting critical temperature, while having superior transport and magnetic properties compared to the core-shell metamaterial superconductors.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova is a professor of physics at Towson University and Christopher Jensen is a graduate student at Towson University.
Student William Zimmerman, physics major at Towson, participated in the research for independent study credit. Zimmerman graduated from Towson University in May 2016 and is enrolled in the professional master's program in applied physics at Towson University. Joseph C. Prestigiacomo and Michael S. Osofsky are research physicists and Heungsoo Kim and Nabil Bassim are materials engineers at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC. Zhen Xing is a graduate student and Mumtaz Qazilbash is an associate professor in the Department of Physics at the College of William and Mary. Igor Smolyaninov is a research scientist in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland-College Park.
Funding This research was supported in part by FCSM Undergraduate Research and Towson Undergraduate Research Grants, which were awarded to Zimmerman, and by NSF grant DMR-1104676 at Towson.

( 2 )

Recorded at: 4/6/2017
Title Three-dimensional, Global, Radiative GRMHD Simulations of a Thermally Unstable Disc
Citation Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 2016; 463: 4:3437-3448, Mishra B, Fragile PC, Johnson LC, Kluzniak W. College of Charleston
Description We present results of a set of three-dimensional, general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations of thin accretion discs around a nonrotating black hole to test their thermal stability. We consider two cases, one that is initially radiation-pressure dominated and expected to be thermally unstable and another that is initially gas-pressure dominated and expected to remain stable. We find evidence for both thermal and viscous instabilities in our radiation-pressure-dominated case.
Faculty Bhupendra Mishra is a PhD student, and Wlodzimierez Kluzniak is a professor at the Nicolas Copernicus Astronomical Center in Warsaw. P. Chris Fragile is a professor of physics and astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Student Caroline Johnson was a junior physics major at the College of Charleston when she contributed to this work as part of a summer project.
Funding This research was also supported by the National Science Foundation under grant NSF AST-1211230.

( 3 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016
Title Lithographically Fabricated Magnifying Maxwell Fisheye Lenses
Citation Photonics, 2016; 3: 8, Smolyaninova V, Jensen C, Zimmerman W, Johnson A, Shaefer D, Smolyaninov I. Towson University
Description Magnifying Maxwell fisheye lenses, which are made of two half-lenses of different radii, have been fabricated using photolithography and characterized. The lens action is based on control of polarization-dependent effective refractive index in a lithographically formed tapered waveguide. We have studied wavelength and polarization dependent performance of the lenses, and their potential applications in waveguide mode sorting.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova and David Schaefer are professors of physics at Towson University. Igor Smolyaninov is a research scientist with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland-College Park.
Student Christopher Jensen and Anthony Johnson are graduate students in physics at Towson. William Zimmerman, physics major at Towson, participated in the research for independent study credit. Zimmerman graduated from Towson University in May 2016 and was accepted to the Professional Masters Program in Applied Physics at Towson University.
Funding This research was supported in part by FCSM Undergraduate Research and Towson Undergraduate Research Grants, as well as by NSF grant DMR-1104676 at Towson University.

( 4 )

Recorded at: 9/22/2016
Title Gravitational Lensing Size Scales for Quasars
Citation Astronomische Nachrichten, 2016; 337: 4:356 – 361, Chartas G, Rhea C, Kochanek C, Dai X, Morgan C, Blackburne J, Chen B, Mosquera A, MacLeod.. College of Charleston
Description We present results from our observations of lensed quasars performed in the optical, UV, and X-ray bands. Modeling of the multi-wavelength light curves provides constraints on the extent of the optical, UV, and X-ray emission regions. One of the important results of our analysis is that the optical sizes as inferred from the microlensing analysis are significantly larger than those predicted by the theoretical-thin-disk estimate. We also present the analysis of several strong microlensing events where we detect an evolution of the relativistic Fe line as the magnification caustic traverses the accretion disk. These caustic crossings are used to constrain the innermost stable circular orbit and the accretion disk inclination angle of the black hole in quasar RX J1131-1231.
Faculty George Chartas is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Student Carter Rhea, a senior math and astronomy major, participated in the research for independent study credit. Carter is currently completing his degree at the College of Charleston and applying to graduate programs.
Funding The research was supported by NASA via the Smithsonian Institution grant G03-141l0B.

( 5 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Orbital engineering of two-dimensional materials with hydrogenation: A realization of giant gap and strongly correlated topological insulators
Citation Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics., 2015; 92: 3:035427-035434, Pham A, Gil CJ, Smith SC, Li S.. University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Description The paper demonstrates that by modifying the surfaces of single metal like Pb, Mo and W with hydrogen, these metals can be transformed from normal metals to a novel state of material known as topological insulators with spin polarized edge states. We also propose that BN substrate can be used to fabricate these 2D structures.
Faculty Anh Pham is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Materials Sciences and Engineering at UNSW. Sean C Smith is the Director of Integrated Materials Design at UNSW. Sean Li is a Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at UNSW.
Student Carmen Gil is currently an undergraduate student and McNair Scholar in the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida. Carmen Gil conducted the research as part of an Engineering Exchange Program with the University of New South Wales in Dr. Sean Li's group.
Funding The computational resources were supported by Intersect Australia Ltd and the National Computing Infrastructure.

( 6 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Discovery of a new blue quasar: SDSS J022218.03-062511.1
Citation Astronomische Nachrichten., 2015; 336: 6:614-618, Fix MB, Smith JA, Tucker DL, Wester W, Annis J. Austin Peay State University & Fermilab
Description We report the seredipitous discovery of a bright quasar which was missed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This quasar is nearby and would rank in the top 1% of brightest quasars based on the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalog.
Faculty Allyn Smith ia a professor of Physics & Astronomy at Austin Peay St. Univ.. Douglas Tucker, William Wester and James Annis are research scientists at Fermilab.
Student Mees Fix is currently working at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD. The work began at Fermilab during the summer of 2013 and continued through the next year at Austin Peay State University.
Funding Funding for this work was initially provided by a Department of Energy Visiting Faculty Program award to Smith , and continued via the Dark Energy Survey support for calibration issues.

( 7 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Using metamaterial nanoengineering to triple the superconducting critical temperature of bulk aluminum
Citation Scientific Reports, 2015; 5: 15777, Smolyaninova VN, Zander K, Gresock T, Jensen C, Prestigiacomo J, Osofsky MS, Smolyaninov II.. Towson University, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Maryland College Park
Description We have shown the viability of the metamaterial approach to dielectric response engineering for enhancing the transition temperature, Tc, of a superconductor. In this report, we demonstrate the use of alumina-coated aluminium nanoparticles to form the recently proposed epsilon near zero (ENZ) core-shell metamaterial superconductor with a Tc that is three times that of pure aluminium. IR reflectivity measurements confirm the predicted metamaterial modification of the dielectric function thus demonstrating the efficacy of the ENZ metamaterial approach to Tc engineering.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova is a professor of physics at Towson University.
Student Kathryn Zander, physics major at Towson, participated in the research for independent study credit. Kathryn graduated from Towson University in May 2015 and planning to apply to graduate school.
Funding This research was supported in part by FCSM Undergraduate Research and Towson Undergraduate Research Grants, which were awarded to Kathryn, and by NSF grant DMR-1104676 at Towson.

( 8 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Experimental demonstration of superconducting critical temperature increase in electromagnetic metamaterials
Citation Scientific Reports., 2014; 4: 7321, Smolyaninova VN, Yost B, Zander K, Osofsky MS, Kim H, Saha S, Greene RL, Smolyaninov II.. Towson University
Description A recent proposal that the metamaterial approach to dielectric response engineering may increase the critical temperature of a composite superconductor-dielectric metamaterial has been tested in experiments with compressed mixtures of tin and barium titanate nanoparticles of varying composition. An increase of the critical temperature of the order of 5 percent compared to bulk tin has been observed for 40% volume fraction of barium titanate nanoparticles.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova is a professor of physics at Towson University.
Student Kathryn Zander, physics major at Towson, participated in the research for independent study credit. Kathryn graduated from Towson University this spring and planning to apply to graduate school.
Funding This research was supported in part by FCSM Undergraduate Research and Towson Undergraduate Research Grants, which were awarded to Kathryn, and by NSF grant DMR-1104676 at Towson.

( 9 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Experimental Demonstration of Luneburg Waveguides
Citation Photonics., 2015; 2: 440-448, Smolyaninova VN, Lahneman D, Adams T, Gresock T, Zander K, Jensen C and Smolyaninov II.. Towson University
Description This work reported the first experimental realization of the TO-based Luneburg waveguides, which may be useful in sensing and nonlinear optics applications. The wavelength and polarization dependent performance of the waveguides was studied. Periodic focusing of optical energy in the waveguide was found, which could result in increased light matter interaction in the well-defined specific locations. Together with other recent advances in TO-based devices, this technique opens up an additional ability to manipulate light on a submicrometer scale.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova is a professor of physics at Towson University.
Student Todd Adams, David Lahneman and Kathryn Zander are physics majors at Towson and participated in the research for independent study credit. Todd is now a naval officer. David is continuing his studies at the PhD program of the Physics Department of the College of William and Mary, VA. Kathryn graduated from Towson University this spring and planning to apply to graduate school.
Funding This research was supported in part by FCSM Undergraduate Research and Towson Undergraduate Research Grants, which were awarded to Todd, David and Kathryn, and by NSF grant DMR-1104676 at Towson.

( 10 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Scaling properties of raindrop size distributions as measured by a dense array of optical disdrometers
Citation Journal of Hydrology., 2015; 521: 424-432, Larsen ML, Hayward TB, Teves JB.. College of Charleston
Description The study used an array of detectors able to measure individual raindrop sizes and arrival times (called disdrometers) to explore scale-invariant behavior in raindrop arrival times. It was confirmed that large raindrops appear more clustered in time than small drops, and that scaling exponents are constant from detector to detector within each rainstorm.
Faculty Michael L. Larsen is an assistant professor of Physics and Astronomy.
Student Timothy Hayward was an undergraduate Senior and Joshua Teves was an undergraduate Sophomore when this work was begun, both funded through National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1230240 secured by Michael Larsen. The research was completed during the summer of 2014. Timothy Hayward is now a doctoral physics program at William and Mary, and Joshua Teves is now an undergraduate junior at the College of Charleston.
Funding The research was funded through National Science Foundation grant AGS-1230240

( 11 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Physical Improvements to a Mesoscopic Cellular Automaton Model for Three-Dimensional Snow Crystal Growth
Citation Crystal Growth and Design., 2014; 14: 3:1392–1405, Kelly JG, Boyer EC. Centre College
Description We motivate and derive the dynamical rules for a computationally feasible three-dimensional cellular automaton model of snow crystal growth. The model improves upon points of weak physical connections identified in other similar models which have produced morphological features observed in many snow crystal photographs. A systematic survey of the morphologies resulting from our model illustrates the degree to which these features persist in our results, and the trends that appear as model parameters are varied.
Faculty James Kelly is an assistant professor of physics.
Student Boyer collaborated during 2010-2012 under a Centre College faculty development grant, and is currently applying to graduate schools.
Funding The research was supported by a Centre College Faculty Development Grant.

( 12 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Phase resetting and its implications for interval timing with intruders
Citation Behavioral Processes, 2014; 111: 146-153, Oprisan SA, Dix S, Buhusi CV. College of Charleston
Description We used a computational model of a distributed neural network of the strato-cortical structures of the brain in order to mimic the perception of time. The computational model gave similar results with experiments conducted in mice. In particular, in this study we investigate the effect of emotional stressors on the subjective perception of time. We carried out both numerical simulations with our newly developed computational model and experiments to validate our results.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Steven is a software engineer currently working for Google. As an undergraduate student he optimized the computational implementation and carried out extensive numerical simulations to verify the effect of external stimuli on the ability of the neural network to perform correct timing.
Funding National Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 supported this research on phase resetting.

( 13 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Fourier Analysis of Phase Resetting Curves of Neural Oscillators
Citation Journal of the South Carolina Academy of Science, 2013; 11: 2:1-7, Raidt AR, Oprisan SA. College of Charleston
Description We used a novel approach to tabulating the relative change in the firing frequency of a neural cell that is more closely related to the mechanism underlying spiking activity. The Fourier coefficients provided a compact and accurate description of neural activity. The advantage of the novel method is that it allows a numerically efficient prediction of large neural networks activity.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Robert Raidt is currently a medical student at Medical University of South Carolina. As undergraduate, he presented his results to numerous local and national meetings of neuroscientists. His research results received multiple awards, including Outstanding Undergraduate Research award form the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Outstanding Undergraduate Research from South Carolina Academy of Science & Charleston Chapter of Sigma Xi - The Scientific Research Society, and American Association for the Advancement of Science award to the Outstanding Male Undergraduate Scientist.
Funding Natinal Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 supported this research on phase resetting.

( 14 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Prediction of Entrainment and 1:1 Phase-Locked Modes in Two-Neuron Networks Based on the Phase Resetting Curve Method
Citation International Journal of Neuroscience, 2008; 118: 867-890, Oprisan SA, Boutan C. College of Charleston
Description We derived novel analytical criteria for the existence and stability of phase-locked modes in neural networks based on the phase resetting curve method. The theoretical predictions were subsequently verified numerically using a conductance-based model.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Christian Boutan is currently a PhD student at University of Washington. As undergraduate, Christian carried out numerical simulation on phase-locked modes in neural networks. He presented his original results to local and national/international meetings, including the annual meeting of the Socity for Neuroscience.
Funding The research was supported by the College of Charleston Research and Development grant to SAO and a Summer Research with Faculty to CB.

( 15 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Are phase resetting curves tunable?
Citation BMC Neuroscience, 2014; 15: 1:75, Oprisan SA, Vanderweyen D, Tuck D. College of Charleston
Description The research was supported by the College of Charleston Research and Development grant to SAO and a Summer Research with Faculty to CB. The widely-accepted paradigm in phase resetting theory is that the neural cells belong to one of the two fundamental types: (1) unimodal response to perturbations that only speeds-up or slows-down neural activity, or (2) bimodal response that allows the neurons to both speeds-up or slows-down neural activity. We showed that in fact all phase resetting curves are bimodal and derived a practical method that allowed us to adjust the ratio of the positive versus negative lobe of neural response.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Davy Vanderweyen is currently a research analyst in neuroimaging at Medical University of South Carolina. Davy worked on numerical simulations of phase resetting curve and presented his original research results at many local, national/international meetings. In recognition of his contributions he received, among other distinctions, the Outstanding Graduate award and Departmental Honors award from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Funding National Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 to SAO supported this research on phase resetting.

( 16 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title What is the effect of noise on the interval timing neural network?
Citation BMC Neuroscience, 2014; 15: 1:74, Oprisan SA, Novo D, Buhusi CV. College of Charleston
Description Neural oscillators produce stable spikes of electrical activity called action potentials (AP) that are suitable as a temporal base for time-keeping neural networks. However, biological noise at all scales, from ionic channels up to behavioral distractors, alter the very precise neural activity and the perceived subjective time. We proved mathematically and verified numerically that in fact the biological noise is critical for the normal activity of the neural network that keeps track of time in our brains. Suppressing or altering the spectral composition of biological noise leads to abnormal time perception.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Derek Novo is currently an undergraduate student in Honors College. He majors in physics and computer science. He worked on a computer model of interval timing, presented his research results at local, national/international professional meetings in neuroscience, mentored junior research assistants, and received awards in recognition of his research results, e.g. Horatio Hughes Summer Research award from the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Phi Kappa Phi Research award for Honors College Bachelor's Essay in computational neuroscience.
Funding National Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 to SAO supported the research.

( 17 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title High dimensional phase resetting curves and their use in predicting network dynamics
Citation BMC Neuroscience, 2011; 12: 1:307, Oprisan SA, Robert Raidt, Andrew Smith. College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
Description Neural networks continuously correct their response to environmental stimuli in order to allow animals to better fit their niches. External stimuli, such as light or temperature, reset or entrain the endogenous rhythms such as those generated by the circadian clock. We investigated the effect of different ionic currents on the stability of the phase-locked mode of a neural network. The evolution and stability of neural attractors was visualized by two-dimensional projections of the multidimensional phase space of the network.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Andrew Jarrell Smith currently works with Ma+h Tutor LLC. As an undergraduate student, Andrew implemented a novel visualization technique for multi dimensional data related to computational neuroscience. He presented his original research results at many local, national/international professional meetings, including the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the annual meeting of the American Physical Society.
Funding National Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 to SAO supported this research on phase resetting.

( 18 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Why are all phase resetting curves bimodal?
Citation BMC Neuroscience, 2013; 14: 1:398, Oprisan SA, Vanderweyen D, Lynn P, Tuck DR. College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
Description Despite the genetic differences in channel expression or morphological differences, there are only two excitability classes for repetitively firing neurons. The classification is roughly determined by the way the neurons encode external stimuli. One class can only increase/decrease its firing rate in response to external stimuli, whereas the other class can both increase and decrease its firing rate to “resonate” with the external stimulus. We investigate the bifurcation structure in the phase space of control parameters of a single cell to better understand the distinction between the two excitability classes.
Faculty Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor with research interest in computational neuroscience.
Student Derek Russell Tuck works towards his physics BS and would like to pursue graduate studies. Derek worked on numerical simulations that aimed at understanding the effect of the stimulus shape on the phase resetting curve of the neurons. He presented his original research results at many local, national/international meetings.
Funding National Science Foundation Career grant IOS-1054914 to SAO supported this research on phase resetting.

( 19 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title A comparison of multivariate analysis techniques and variable selection strategies in a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy bacterial classification
Citation Spectrochimica Acta B., 2013; 87: 161-167, Putnam RA, Mohaidat QI, Daabous A, Rehse SJ. University of Windsor
Description Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used to obtain spectral fingerprints from live bacterial specimens from thirteen distinct taxonomic bacterial classes representative of five bacterial genera. By taking sums, ratios, and complex ratios of measured atomic emission line intensities three unique sets of independent variables (models) were constructed to determine which choice of independent variables provided optimal genus-level classification of unknown specimens utilizing a discriminant function analysis.
Faculty Dr. Steven Rehse is Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Windsor. Qassem Mohaidat was a graduate student at Wayne State University when this research was completed.
Student At the time this research was completed Russell Putnam and Andrew Daabous were undergraduate students in the Outstanding Scholars program at the University of Windsor. Putnam is now a Candidate for a Master’s in Physics at the University of Windsor. Daabous is in his senior year.
Funding Outstanding Scholars funded the work of the undergraduate students.

( 20 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Sensitive and specific discrimination of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli using Raman spectroscopy - a comparison of two multivariate analysis techniques
Citation Biomedical Optics Express, 2013; 4: 481-489, Hamasha K, Mohaidat QI, Putnam RA, Woodman RC, Palchaudhuri S, Rehse SJ. University of Windsor
Description The determination of bacterial identity at the strain level is still a complex and time-consuming endeavor. In this study, visible wavelength spontaneous Raman spectroscopy has been used for the discrimination of four closely related Escherichia coli strains: pathogenic enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and non-pathogenic E. coli C, E. coli Hfr K-12, and E. coli HF4714. This study suggests that spontaneous Raman spectroscopy with visible wavelength excitation is potentially useful for the rapid identification and classification of clinically-relevant bacteria at the strain level.
Faculty Dr. Steven Rehse is Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Windsor. Sunil Palchaudhuri is Professor at Wayne State University's School of Medicine. Khozima Hamasha was a graduate student at Wayne State. He is now Assistant Professor of Biomedical Physics at the University of Jordan. Qassem Mohaidat was a graduate student at Wayne State University.
Student At the time this research was completed Russell Putnam was an undergraduate student in the Outstanding Scholars program at the University of Windsor. Putnam is now a Candidate for a Master’s in Physics at the University of Windsor. Ryan C. Woodman is an undergraduate researcher in the Department of Physics at the University of Windsor.
Funding The Outstanding Scholars program funded the participation of Russell Putnam.

( 21 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Reinvestigating the Clusters Koposov 1 and 2
Citation The Astronomical Journal, 2014; 148: 1:19, Paust, NEQP, Wilson, D, van Belle, G.. Whitman College, Lowell Observatory
Description We determined that two star clusters were not old globular clusters belonging to the Milky Way, as previous authors suggested. Instead, both of the clusters are younger open clusters which joined the Milky Way when it caniballized a smaller galaxy a few billion years ago.
Faculty Nathaniel Paust is an assistant professor of astronomy at Whitman College. Gerard van Belle is an astronomer at Lowell Observatory.
Student Danielle Wilson undertook this work as an independent study project during the 2012-2013 school year. She is currently working for Key Technology in an optical engineering position.
Funding This project was funded through faculty startup funds to Prof. Paust.

( 22 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title BVI Photometry and the Red Giant Branch Luminosity Function of M15
Citation The Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2014; 126: 942:Feuillet DK, Paust NEQ, Chaboyer B.. Whitman College
Description We present high precision photometry of the globular cluster M15 taken in three bands. Using that data, we determine the age and distance to the cluster. We also use the number of stars in the cluster as a test of stellar evolution.
Faculty Nathaniel Paust is an assistant professor of astronomy at Whitman College. Brian Chaboyer is a professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College.
Student Diane Feuillet undertook this work in 2011-2012 for her honors thesis project. She is currently working on her PhD in astronomy at New Mexico State University.
Funding This work was supported by startup funds provided to Dr. Paust by Whitman College.

( 23 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals
Citation Scientific Reports., 2014; 4: 5706, Smolyaninova VN, Yost B, Lahneman D, Narimanov EE, Smolyaninov II. Towson University, Purdue University, University of Maryland, College Park
Description We have demonstrated a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova, professor, was mentoring students participating in this research at the Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University.
Student Undergraduate physics major David Lahneman was involved in this project for independent study credit. David is now continuing his studies at the PhD program of the Physics Department of the College of William and Mary, VA.
Funding Undergraduate physics major David Lahneman was involved in this project for independent study credit. David is now continuing his studies at the PhD program of the Physics Department of the College of William and Mary, VA.

( 24 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Stellar Populations of 16 Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR Surface Brightness Fluctuation Observations
Citation Bulletin of American Astronomical Society, 2014; 223: Lee, H.-c., Le Grice, V., Blakeslee, J.P., Jensen, J.B., Lee, Y.. The University of Texas-Pan American
Description We have estimated the luminosity-weighted ages of 16 early-type galaxies in Virgo and Fornax clusters based upon the near-IR (F110W and F160W) SBF observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).
Faculty Hyun-chul Lee is an Astronomy Lecturer.
Student Victoria Le Grice successfully finished her Astronomy Minor degree with English Major and will start her graduate study at Texas State University.
Funding The Research was supported by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Partial supports also came from the Undergraduate Research Initiative at the UTPA.

( 25 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Application of a laser trap as a viscometer.
Citation Proceedings of SPIE, Advanced Microscopy Techniques III., 2013; 8797: Cooper J, Solomon R, Elrod S, Barnes T, Crawford C, Farone A, Farone M, Erenso D.. Middle Tennessee State University
Description This article presents new application of a laser trap (LT) for measuring the viscosities of fluids in a micro volume flow. By calibrating the LT using silica micro-beads in a fluid with a known viscosity (water) and trapping identical same silica beads suspended in a fetal bovine serum (FBS), we have determined the viscosity of the FBS that we verified using measurements by an Ostwald viscometer. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, the use of LT for a precise measurement of viscosity in a micro flow.
Faculty Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics, Dr. Anthony Farone and Dr. Mary Farone are professors of Biology at Middle Tennessee State University.
Student Five undergraduate students participated in the research in 2007, 2009, and 2012: James Cooper, Rance Solomon, Cameron Crawford, Taylor Barnes, and Sam Elrod. James Cooper, Rance Solomon are seniors majoring in physics and Cameron Crawford is also a seniors majoring in biology, Taylor Barnes is currently a graduate student at California Institute of Technology, and Sam Elrod is a senior software engineer at Churchill Mortgage Company in Nashville, Tennessee.
Funding The research was supported by Middle Tennessee State University Undergraduate Research Experience and Creative Activity Grants, which provided some student summer stipends.

( 26 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Semiclassical entanglement analyses in a non-degenerate parametric oscillator (NDPO).
Citation The Rochester Conferences on Coherence and Quantum Optics and the Quantum Information and Measurement meeting, OSA Technical Digest, 2013; 44: Erenso DB, Dodson J, Kassahun F.. Middle Tennessee State University
Description This article presents a theoretical study in the entanglement of the intracavity photons in subthreshold none degenerate parametric oscillator (NDPO) coupled to a squeezed vacuum using the von-Neumann entropy (VNE). The VNE is calculated in terms of the Q-function which is a semiclassical representation for the density operator. The study have revealed results for the degree of entanglement in the twin photons that is obtained by deriving the VNE in terms of the Q-function.
Faculty Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics at Middle Tennessee State University and Dr. Fesseha Kassahun is a professor of physics at Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Student One undergraduate student is participated in the research in 2013: Jordan Dodson. Jordan Dodson is currently a senior triple-majoring in physics, Mathematics, and chemistry.
Funding

( 27 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Polarization encrypted quantum teleportation using two type-II parametric down converters.
Citation The Rochester Conferences on Coherence and Quantum Optics and the Quantum Information and Measurement meeting, OSA Technical Digest, 2013; 2013: Erenso DB, Bonior D, Bunnell B, and Norris H.. Middle Tennessee State University
Description This article presents a theoretical study in the fidelity of a quantum teleportation scheme that uses polarization and spectrally entangled photons emitted by two type-II spontaneous parametric down converters (SPDC). For this scheme, where the encryption is on the polarization state of another photon, we have studied the effect of the spectral entanglement on the fidelity in comparison with single SPDC scheme and the results have revealed an improved fidelity under some specific conditions.
Faculty Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics at Middle Tennessee State University.
Student some specific conditions. Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics at Middle Tennessee State University. Three undergraduate students participated in the research in 2010 and 2011: Daniel Bonior, Benjamin Bunnell, Hannah Norris. Daniel Bonior is a graduate student at the University of Central Florida, Benjamin Bunnell has graduated in 2013 and currently lives in the Boston area, Hannah Norris is working as a research analyst at Duke University Medical Center.
Funding The research was supported by Middle Tennessee State University Undergraduate Research Experience and Creative Activity Grants, which provided student summer stipends for the students.

( 28 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Assessment of the elasticity of erythrocytes in different physiological fluids by laser traps.
Citation Optics and Photonics Journal,, 2013; 3: 2:211-216, Barnes T, Shulman A, Farone A, Farone M, Erenso D.. Middle Tennessee State University
Description This article presents a study on the effects of physiological fluids commonly used to suspend red blood cells (RBCs) in the cells’ elasticity. By suspending the RBCs in fetal bovine serum (FBS), newborn bovine serum (NBBS), and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and deforming the cells using two laser traps, we have studied the elasticity of each cells in each of these fluids. The results for the NBBS is not statistically different from the PBS solution; however for FBS the elasticity is significantly higher.
Faculty Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics, Dr. Anthony Farone, and Dr. Mary Farone are professors of Biology at Middle Tennessee State University.
Student Two undergraduate students participated in the research in 2006 and 2012: Taylor Barnes is currently a graduate student at California Institute of Technology and Adam Shulman is a Medical Physicist at Overlook Hospital, Jersey City, New Jersey.
Funding The research was supported by Middle Tennessee State University Undergraduate Research Experience and Creative Activity Grants, which provided summer stipends to the students.

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Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Physical and Mechanical Properties of the Human Red Blood Cells with Different Hemoglobin Types.
Citation Proceedings of the National Conference On Undergraduate Research (NCUR), 2013; 2013: Solomon R, Cooper J, Aguilar E, Welker J, Pennycuff C, Scott D, Flanagan B, Erenso D.. Middle Tennessee State University
Description This article reports an experimental study that is conducted on the response of the human red blood cells (RBCs) from blood samples with different types of Hemoglobin (HbAS), (HbSS), (HbAA), and (HbFF) to direct laser trap. The hemoglobin quantitation study is conducted using Ultra2-High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The response is analyzed using size changes of the trapped cells relative to the corresponding free size in relation with the hemoglobin quantitation for each blood samples.
Faculty Dr. Daniel Erenso is a professor of physics, Dr. Anthony Farone and Dr. Mary Farone are professors of Biology. Dr. Robert Mushi is the director of the Laboratory and Dr. Maria del Pilar Aguinaga is the associate director and a professor at the Sickle Cell Center and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Meharry Medical College.
Student Seven undergraduate students participated in the research over the summer of 2012: Rance Solomon, James Cooper, Gabriel Welker, Elaura Aguilar, Brooke Flanagan, Chelsey Pennycuff, and David Scott. Rance Solomon, James Cooper, Gabriel Welker are currently seniors majoring in physics; Elaura Aguilar, Brooke Flanagan, Chelsey Pennycuff, David Scott are seniors currently majoring in Nursing, Biology, Mathematics, and English, respectively.
Funding The research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and by Middle Tennessee State University Undergraduate Research Experience and Creative Activity Grants, which provided some student summer stipends.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Quantitative 3D Model of Light Transmittance Through Translucent Rocks Applied to the Hypolithic Microbial Community
Citation Microbial Ecology., 2013; 66: 112-119, Jolitz RD, McKay, CP.. NASA Ames Research Center
Description The study examines the light requirements to sustain microbes living on the subsurface edges of rocks in hyperarid deserts. A radiative transfer simulation was developed to predict the transmittance of photons through such a rock. Subsurface sides were determined to be 14-24 times brighter than the basal subsurface. This implies that inhabited rocks act as a "sail" for both light and water to sustain microbes in the perilithic habitat.
Faculty Chris McKay is a research scientist in the Space Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center.
Student Rebecca is currently a graduating undergraduate senior in the mathematics and physics departments at UC Berkeley. She began the study as a summer intern in 2009.
Funding This research was supported by NASA's Astrobiology Program and a fellowship from the Davidson Foundation awarded to Rebecca.

( 31 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Frame Transformation Relations and Symmetry Analysis of Fluxional Symmetric Rotor Dimers
Citation Symmetry, 2013; 5: 1:86-118, Crogman, Horace T.; Choi, Bumgyunmiga; Chen, Harrison B.; Harter, William G. La Sierra University
Description The theory of Frame transformation relations between the states of Born Oppenheimer and the weak coupling approximations is developed for polyatomic molecules. This research was a generalization of the frame transformation relations derived by Harter and Crogman for coupled rotor molecules accounting for the symmetry as result of a weakly coupled system vs a strongly couple one. This approach could help other scientists to better characterize the behavior of interacting dimers.
Faculty Dr. Horace Crogman was an assistant professor of physics at La Sierra University. This work was done in collaboration with Dr. William Harter at the university of Arkansas.
Student Bumgyunmiga Choi a senior, and Harrison Chen a junior at the time participated in the research for independent study credit. Bumgyunmiga is doing a Masters at Cal State Northridge and Harrison is now a Senior at La Sierra University
Funding This research was supported by a Research Corporation Cottrell College Science Award.

( 32 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Experimental demonstration of birefringent transformation optics devices
Citation Physical Review B., 2013; 87: 075406, Smolyaninova VN, Ermer HK, Piazza A, Schaefer D, Smolyaninov II.. Towson University and University of Maryland, College Park
Description We have reported the first experimental realization of birefringent transformation optics devices, which perform different functions for mutually orthogonal polarization states of light. Using effective birefringence of a lithographically formed dielectric waveguide on a metal substrate, we have created a Luneburg lens for TM polarized light, which behaves as a spatial (directional) filter for TE polarized light. Our technique opens up an additional degree of freedom in optical design.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova and David Schaefer, professors, were mentoring students participating in this research at the Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University.
Student Undergraduate physics major Alex Piazza was involved in this project for independent study credit. Alex graduated and continuing his career at Elzly Technology Corporation.
Funding This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-1104676.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Experimental demonstration of metamaterial “multiverse” in a ferrofluid
Citation Optics Express., 2013; 21: 014918, Smolyaninov II, Yost B, Bates E, Smolyaninova VN.. Towson University and University of Maryland, College Park
Description We have experimentally investigated polarization-dependent optical transmission of a cobalt based ferrofluid at 1500 nm. In magnetic field at sufficient nanoparticle concentration such ferrofluid becomes a hyperbolic metamaterial. Thermal fluctuations of nanoparticle concentration lead to transient formation of hyperbolic regions (3D Minkowski spacetimes) inside this metamaterial, which has similarity to creation and disappearance of individual Minkowski spacetimes (universes) in the cosmological multiverse.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova, professor at the Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, was mentoring students participating in this research.
Student Undergraduate physics major Evan Bates was involved in this project for independent study credit. Evan is currently in graduate school at University of Maryland Baltimore County.
Funding This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-1104676.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title A Mini X-Ray Survey of Sub-DLAs; Searching for AGNs Formed in Protogalaxies
Citation Astrophysical Journal., 2013; 774: 2:Chartas G., Kulkarni V. P., and Asper A.. College of Charleston
Description We investigated whether protogalaxies harbor active galactic nuclei (AGN) by performing a mini-survey of 21 quasars known to contain sub-damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) absorption systems in their spectra. The observations were performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In six cases we find possible X-ray emission within ~ 1 arcsec of the background quasar consistent with the presence of a nearby X-ray source. If these nearby X-ray sources are at the redshifts of the sub-DLAs, their estimated X-ray luminosities suggest that the emission originates in a galactic nucleus near the center of a protogalaxy. The projected distances of these possible nearby X-ray sources from the background quasars are consistent with our hypothesis that they represent AGNs centered on the sub-DLAs.
Faculty George Chartas is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Student Abigail Asper is an astrophysics major, and participated in the research for independent study credit during her freshman year.
Funding The research was supported by NASA via the Smithsonian Institution Grant SAO AR0-11019X

( 35 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Pion momentum distributions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory
Citation PHYSICAL REVIEW D., 2013; 87: 056009:1-8, Burkardt M.,Hendricks KS, Ji CR,Melnitchouk W.,Thomas AW.. North Carolina State University and Jefferson Laboratory
Description This article provided the first principle model independent computation of the light-cone momentum distributions of pions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory using both pseudovector and pseudoscalar pion-nucleon couplings. The results pave the way for phenomenological applications of pion cloud models that are manifestly consistent with the chiral symmetry properties of QCD.
Faculty Chueng-Ryong Ji is professor and director of graduate program in the Department of Physics at North Carolina State University.
Student Khalida S. Hendricks was an undergraduate student at North Carolina State University (NCSU) admitted to the program of Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) while she was working on this research project. She was co-advised by Dr. Wally Melnitchouk at Jefferson Laboratory and Prof. C.-R. Ji at NCSU. Khalida will join the graduate program in physics at Ohio State University from this fall, 2013.
Funding This work was supported by the DOE Contract No. DE- 9AC05-06OR23177, the DOE Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41260 and the DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) Program.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Dynamic shadowgraph experiments and image processing techniques for investigating non-equilibrium fluctuations during free diffusion in nanocolloids
Citation Optics Communications, 2013; 290: 100–106, Oprisan A, Payne AL.. College of Charleston
Description We studied the rate of diffusion of nanoparticles in an aqueous environment and found very large (giant) concentration-driven fluctuations. We used three different nanocolloidal suspensions (gold, silver and silica). We performed small angle light scattering experiments that allowed very high-resolution visualization of large-scale fluctuations leading to enhanced diffusivity of nanoparticles. We developed and implemented a novel image processing technique - the dynamic structure factor algorithm – that showed spatial correlations over about two orders of magnitude larger compared to particles’ sizes and a correlation time of the order of seconds. The spatial correlation estimates the active area that the nanoparticles cover during passive diffusion and the correlation time measures the nanoparticle - cancer tumor cell duration of interaction.
Faculty Dr. Ana Oprisan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston.
Student Alexis Leilani Payne is currently a sophomore undergraduate at the College of Charleston. She started working as a research assistant in Soft Condensed Matter & Image Processing Lab under Dr. Ana Oprisan’s mentorship as a freshman since the spring of 2012. She presented a research poster during the local Celebration of Scholars event (August, 2012), gave one talk in Department of Physics and Astronomy (September, 2012) at the College of Charleston, and presented one poster during the Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society (March, 2013).
Funding Research sponsored by a 2012 Summer Undergraduate Research with Faculty from the College of Charleston.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Shaping the Brown Dwarf Desert : Constraints from Turbulent Fragmentation
Citation Astrophysical Journal., 2013; 769: 9:Jumper PH, Fisher RT.. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Description This research suggested that several observed properties of brown dwarfs (a class of substellar objects) in binary systems could be accounted for as a consequence of a single mechanism, the fragmentation of a turbulent, star-forming region. These properties include the “brown dwarf desert” (a dearth of brown dwarfs in nearby orbits around Sun-like stars) and the narrow separations for pairs of brown dwarfs.
Faculty Robert Fisher is an assistant professor of physics.
Student Peter Jumper, a Commonwealth scholar, physics major, and mathematics minor, participated in this research from the summer of 2010 to the spring of 2013. Peter has now graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Physics with Honors and will be a Connaught Ph.D. Fellow in the fall of 2013 in the University of Toronto’s Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Funding Fisher's work was funded through NSF Grant CNS-0959382 and AFOSR DURIP Grant FA9550-10-1-0354. PJ was funded by NSF Grant DMS-0802974.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Revealing the Structure of an Accretion Disk through Energy-dependent X-Ray Microlensing.
Citation Astrophysical Journal., 2012; 757: 137:Chartas, G, Kochanek, C S, Dai, X, Moore, D, Mosquera, A M, and Blackburned, J A. College of Charleston
Description We presented results from monitoring observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231 performed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We detected significant microlensing in the X-ray light curves of the lensed images of the quasar. Our microlensing results place constraints on the sizes of the black holes accretion disk and the hot corona. We also reported the detection of evolution of the fluorescent Fe line that originates from the accretion disk during the microlensing event. This evolution is consistent with the line distortion expected when a caustic passes over the inner disk where the shape of the fluorescent Fe line is distorted by general relativistic and Doppler effects.
Faculty George Chartas is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Student Drew Moore, an astrophysics major, participated in the research for independent study credit during his sophomore and junior years. Drew Moore is currently a senior astrophysics major at the College of Charleston.
Funding The research was supported by NASA via the Smithsonian Institution Grants SAO GO0-11121A/B/C/D, SAO GO1-12139A/B/C, and GO2-13132A/B/C.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Wedges, cones, cosmic strings and their vacuum energy
Citation Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical., 2012; 45: 374018 (24 pp), Fulling SA, Trendafilova CS, Truong PN, Wagner J.. Texas A&M University
Description In quantum field theory the "shape" of space determines the density of energy present in the ground state of a quantum field. This project determined this function for wedges with reflecting sides and for space-times with a stringlike singularity on an axis.
Faculty Stephen Fulling is Professor of Mathematics and Physics. Jef Wagner was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics in Spring 2010; he is now a postdoctoral fellow in physics at the University of California at Riverside.
Student Cynthia Trendafilova did the major part of the work as an Undergraduate Research Fellow Thesis in 2011-12; she is now a graduate student in physics at the University of Texas at Austin. Preliminary work was done by Mai Truong during the summer of 2008; she is now a graduate student in physics at the University of California at Berkeley.
Funding The project, including summer stipends for both students, was supported by a grant from the Physics division of the National Science Foundation.

( 40 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Ultrasmooth metallic films with buried nanostructures for reflection-mode plasmonic biosensing.
Citation Annalen der Physik., 2012; 524: 687-696, Lindquist NC, Johnson TW, Jose J, Otto LM, and Oh S-H.. University of Minnesota
Description A new sensor with gold nano-structures buried underneath ultrasmooth gold surfaces was developed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing. Unlike other SPR biosensors, this device allowed the use of opaque or highly scattering liquids as well as spectral tunability and wide-field imaging. Beyond biosensing, these buried nanostructures with ultrasmooth surfaces can benefit nano-photonic waveguides, surface-enhanced spectroscopy, nano-lithography, and optical trapping for biological research. The work was featured as a backside cover article.
Faculty Nathan Lindquist is an assistant professor of Physics at Bethel University and Sang-Hyun Oh is an associate professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Minnesota.
Student Lauren Otto begun work on this project during the summer of 2011 as an REU student and is currently supported by a PhD fellowship at the University of Minnesota.
Funding The research was supported by a National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) REU that was awarded to Lauren.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Direct Imaging Discovery of a 'Super-Jupiter' Around the Late B-Type Star Kappa Andromedae
Citation Astrophysical Journal Letters., 2013; 763: 32, Carson, J, Thalmann, C, Janson, M, Kozakis, T, Bonnefoy, M., Biller, B, Schlieder, J, Currie, T, McElwain, M, Goto, M, Henning, T, Brandner, W, Feldt, M, Kandori, R, Kuzuhara, M, Stevens, L, Wong, P, Gainey, K, + 38 authors.. College of Charleston, Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, + 12 institutions.
Description This manuscript describes the direct imaging discovery of a 'Super-Jupiter' around the nearby, high mass star Kappa Andromedae. With an orbital semimajor axis about twice that of Neptune, and a mass about 12.8 Jupiter masses, the discovery represents one of only a handful of extrasolar planets ever directly imaged, and the only such case around a star so massive. The discovery suggests that stars as massive as 2.5 solar masses are still fully capable of producing planets within their primordial circumstellar disks.
Faculty Joe Carson is an assistant professor of physics & astronomy at the College of Charleston.
Student Undergraduate authors Thea Kozakis, Laura Stevens, Palmer Wong, and Kevin Gainey, all astrophysics majors, participated in the investigation for summer research, senior thesis research, and independent study, from 2011 to 2012.
Funding The research was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (awarded to Carson) and the College of Charleston SURF program (awarded to Kozakis).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Equation of State in a Strongly Interacting Relativistic System
Citation Phys. Rev. C., 2012; 86: 35205:Ferrer EJ, Keith JP.. University of Texas at El Paso
Description In this paper we presented the results of our investigation on the state of high dense matter that can exist in the core of neutron stars in the strong coupling regime. In these systems a crossover from a BCS regime formed by diquark Cooper pairs to a Bose-Einstein condensate of diquark molecules is expected. It was found that, in order to have a stable system formed by diquark pairs at very strong interactions, the repulsion between diquarks becomes essential. Under such consideration, the condensate retains its Cooper-pair BCS nature even at very strong interaction, where it was previously thought that it should be formed by a Bose-Einstein condensate. Possible consequences for the astrophysics of neutron stars were also discussed.
Faculty Dr. Efrain J. Ferrer is a professor of physics.
Student Jason P. Keith is now a Ph.D. student at the University of Texas at Austin. He conducted research with Dr. Ferrer for two years (2010-2012) and co-authored two peer-reviewed articles. He presented his research at the March 2010 and October 2011 Joint Meeting of the Texas Section of the APS, AAPT, and SPS, in addition to other local and regional meetings. He received the Best Physics Junior (2011) and Best Physics Senior (2012) awards from the Physics Department at the University of Texas at El Paso. He also received the 2012 Campus Office of Undergraduate Research Initiatives (COURI) award given to the Best College of Science Undergraduate Researcher.
Funding Jason P. Keith received direct support from a UTEP-COURI stipend award. The research was partially supported by a DOE Nuclear Theory Grant (DE-SC0002179).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Quasinormal modes of Bardeen black hole: scalar perturbations.
Citation Physical Review D., 2012; 86: 064039-064052, Fernando S, Correa J.. Northern Kentucky University
Description The purpose of this paper is to study quasinormal modes (QNM) of the Bardeen black hole due to scalar perturbations. We have done a thorough analysis of the QNM frequencies by varying the charge $q$, mass $M$ and the spherical harmonic index $l$. The unstable null geodesics are used to compute the QNM's in the eikonal limit. Furthermore, massive scalar field modes are also studied by varying the mass of the field. Comparisons are done with the QNM frequencies of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole
Faculty Sharmanthie Fernando is an associate professor at Northern Kentucky University
Student Juan Correa is a physics major who participated in the research for credit in the year 2012. Juan is still here at Northern Kentucky University and will graduate in May 2013.
Funding None

( 44 )

Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Dynamics of a wetting layer and Marangoni convection in microgravity
Citation Phys. Rev. E, 2011; 84: 021202, Oprisan A, Hegseth JJ, Smith GM, Lecoutre C, Garrabos Y, Beysens DA.. College of Charleston
Description We studied the nucleation and growth of ordered structures from a disordered state, i.e., symmetry breaking, in a pure supercritical fluid under microgravity conditions in order to avoid sedimentation and convection. Recorded images showed two patterns: an almost constant fraction of droplets, presumably due to the nucleation from the gaseous phase, and a shift of the mean of the droplet size distribution towards larger sizes, presumably due to coalescence. The interfacial processes led to the first experimental observation of large scale convections in pure fluids due to thermocapillary effects.
Faculty Dr. Ana Oprisan is an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.
Student Gregory M. Smith is currently in a doctoral program in physics at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. He gained research experience in image processing and data mining using microgravity data (2007- 2009). He presented research posters at international meetings (American Physical Society, 2008; 17 Symposium on Thermophysical Properties, 2009) and many state and local research meetings, and completed a senior thesis on critical fluids in microgravity. Greg won “Horace Byrne Explorers Club Award" (Outstanding Frontier Science by an undergraduate student), "American Association for the Advancement of Science Award" (Outstanding Male Undergraduate Scientists), and South Carolina Academy of Sciences " Outstanding Student Research Award."
Funding Greg received direct support through a NASA-SCSGC fellowship, Major Academic Year Support and Research Presentation Grants form Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities program at the College of Charleston.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Dielectric-Barrier Discharges in Two-Dimensional Lattice Potentials
Citation Phys Rev Lett., 2012; 108: 3:035005-(1-4), Sinclair J, Walhout M.. Calvin College
Description This work connects the study of pattern formation in dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) systems with areas of physics involving particles and interactions in two-dimensional (2D) lattice potentials. To date there have been many investigations of how plasma filaments in a DBD can arrange themselves in various 1D and 2D patterns. The present study introduces a nonuniform electric-field profile that has the form of a 2D square lattice and provides a template for various filament patterns. The observed patterns are reminiscent of those found in many other physical systems.
Faculty Matthew Walhout is a professor of physics and the dean for research and scholarship at Calvin College.
Student Josiah Sinclair is an undergraduate student at Calvin College. He undertook this project as a summer research fellow after his sophomore year.
Funding The research was supported by Calvin College and the National Science Foundation (Grant PHY-1068078).

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Large photoinduced conductivity reduction in thin films of metallic ferromagnetic manganites.
Citation Appl. Phys. Lett., 2011; 99: 22:222507, Smolyaninova VN, Yong G, Kolagani RM, Biswas A, Ermer HK, Wang K, Piazza A.. Towson University
Description This paper reports on a study of photoinduced resistivity changes in thin films of ferromagnetic metallic manganites. We have observed a significant increase of resistance in La0.7Ba0.3MnO3 thin film under continuous wave argon ion laser illumination presumably associated with photoinduced demagnetization. Photoinduced effects in manganites are important not only due to interesting fundamental physics but also because of potential applications in photonic and opto-electronic devices.
Faculty Vera Smolyaninova, an associate professor, and Grace Yong, a research associate, were mentoring students participating in this research at the Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University. Rajeswari Kolagani is an associate professor in the same department. Amlan Biswas is their collaborator from the University of Florida.
Student Undergraduate physics majors Alex Piazza and Kilhwan Wang were involved in this project for independent study credit. Kurt Ermer is a masters student in the same group. Alex and Kilhwan are finishing their coursework and planning to graduate from Towson University this year.
Funding This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-0348939.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Light-bending tests of Lorentz invariance.
Citation Phys. Rev. D., 2011; 84: 8:085025, Tso Rhondale, Bailey Quentin G.. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Description Recently, there has been growing interest among physicists in high-precision tests of Einstein’s Special and General Theories of Relativity. This is motivated by the possibility of finding miniscule relativity violations as a signal of new physics from an, as yet unknown, unified theory of gravity and quantum physics. One classic test of General Relativity is the bending of distant starlight around the sun. In this paper, we use an established general framework for relativity tests, called the Standard-Model Extension, to derive a modified deflection angle formula for light passing near the sun. We describe how this formula can be used by future dedicated light-bending tests, such as ESA’s Gaia mission, to measure new types of hypothetical relativity violations.
Faculty Dr. Quentin G. Bailey is an assistant professor in the physics department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott.
Student Undergraduate Rhondale Tso is a senior physics major who participated in the research project during the 2009-10 and 2010-11 academic years as part of an independent study and undergraduate research project.
Funding The research was supported by the Arizona NASA Space Grant and the Ronald McNair Scholars program.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states for quantum communication
Citation Phys. Rev. A Rapid Communications., 2011; 83: 030302(R), Sua YM, Scanlon E, Beaulieu T, Bollen V, Lee KF.. Michigan Technological University
Description The research work is about performing a new protocol of quantum communication by using intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states. We make use of nonlinear post measurement method to obtain coherent state bi-partite correlation through balanced homodyne detection. The experiment demonstrated key (bit) correlations between Alice and Bob separated by 10 km of optical fiber.
Faculty Kim Fook Lee is an assistant professor of physics.
Student Yong Meng Sua is currently a third year graduate student in physics. Erin Scanlon is currently in a doctoral program in Georgia Tech. Travis Beaulieu is currently a 5th year undergraduate Physics student at Michigan Tech. Viktor Bollen is currently in a doctoral program in physics at the Washington State University.
Funding The research was supported by Michigan Tech 's Start-up fund and Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) at Michigan Tech, which was awarded to Erin in 2010.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Dynamics of a wetting layer and Marangoni convection in microgravity
Citation Phys. Rev. E., 2011; 84: 84:Oprisan A, Hegseth JJ, Smith GM, Lecoutre C, Garrabos Y, Beysens DA.. College of Charleston, SC
Description The present study examined experimental data regarding the evolution of solid-liquid wetting layer and convective flows in pure fluids under microgravity conditions. Our group used unique experimental data recorded on the Mir Space Station to investigate the convection-driven fast nucleation process that leads to phase separation. We found a “butterfly effect” in which small and local asymmetries in the thermal field during the critical stage of phase separation led to global convective flows. Such long-range effect have potential applications in micro- and nanofluidic devices, e.g., lab-on-a-chip, for biochemical assays.
Faculty Ana Oprisan is an assistant professor of physics at the College of Charleston (CofC).
Student Gregory M. Smith, CofC physics major, participated in undergraduate research in soft condensed matter and image processing, completed his senior thesis project, and received a few research awards under Ana’s mentorship, e.g., “Outstanding Student Research Award' from South Carolina Academy of Science, “Outstanding Male Undergraduate Scientists” from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 'Horace Byrne Explorers Club Award' for Outstanding Frontier Science Research. Gregory Smith is currently in a doctoral program in physics at Wake Forest University.
Funding The research was supported by NASA grants and a Research and Development grant form the CofC awarded to Ana. Gregory received support from the CofC MAYS and RPG program.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title The rolling release rulapult.
Citation The Phys Teac., 2011; 49: 353-355, West J, Ross S, Flesher J.. Indiana State University
Description The research was an investigation of an alternative version of the basic catapult. The way we proposed to have the mass leave the spar was new (something impressive after the hundreds of years people have used them). We then applied that idea to a lab exercise for K-12 students using very safe catapults that could be built by the students in just a few minutes, from easy to obtain materials and for a low total cost.
Faculty Joseph West is an assitant professor of physics.
Student Seth Ross received a B.S. in physics from Indiana State University in 2007. He obtained a Masters degree in physics (December 2010), working on density functional theory as applied to solids in the Center for Computational Nanosciences (CCN) at Ball State University.James Flesher received a B.S. in physics from Indiana State University in 2005. He entered the Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows program (Purdue University) as part of the Inaugural Cohort in 2009, and plans to teach physics at the high school level.
Funding

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing
Citation Phys. Rev. A., 2011; 83: 023408, Gillen-Christandl K, Copsey B.. California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
Description The future of data security and simulation of complex systems resides in quantum computing, which uses quantum mechanical particles, such as atoms, ions, or photons as the basis for computation, rather than the traditional transistor based bit. Our research focuses on quantum computing using laser-cooled neutral atoms. We explored the atom traps formed in the diffraction pattern behind a pinhole illuminated by a laser in order to solve the remaining scalability problem of neutral atom quantum computing. We found that the light polarization dependence of the traps can be used to create a large addressable array of atoms that can be brought together and apart controllably for the implementation of quantum gates.
Faculty Katharina Gillen-Christandl is an assistant professor of physics.
Student Bert Copsey participated in this research since his sophomore year initially as part of the Cal Poly Honors Program and continued the work on grant support. Bert is currently completing a Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering at Cal Poly, and plans to enter a doctoral program in physics in the near future.
Funding This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Measurement of Optically Pumped CH_{3}^{18}OH Laser Frequencies Between 3 and 9 THz
Citation IEEE J. Quantum Electron., 2011; 47: 3:386 - 389, Jackson M, Milne JA, Zink LR.. Central Washington University
Description This investigation examined whether the O-18 isotopic form of methanol could serve as an effective source of laser emissions in the short wavelength portion (below 150 micron) of the far-infrared region. During the course of this study, four laser emissions were discovered and the frequencies of twelve laser lines were measured with fractional uncertainties up to a few parts in ten million. This work includes the discovery and frequency measurement of the first 9 THz laser emission generated by this laser medium, tripling the frequency range previously available from optically pumped O-18 methanol.
Faculty Michael Jackson is a professor of physics and department chairperson at Central Washingon University while Lyndon Zink is a faculty member in the physics department at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.
Student Jason Milne is a senior majoring in physics and mathematics. He participated in the summer through a paid research experience and in the academic year for research credit. Jason is in the process of applying to graduate programs.
Funding The research was supported by the National Science Foundation (award no. 0910935) and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.