Council on Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Send to Printer

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Health Sciences Highlights

Total Listing: 44 (Listed by the order of record adding time, Descending)

( 1 )

Recorded at: 9/29/2017
Title Partnering for Evidence-Based Practice
Citation Neonatal Network: The Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 2017; 36: 2:107-109, Cardona J, Barclay S, Izquirdo K, O’Hagen K & Raines, D.. Sisters of Charity Hospital and University at Buffalo
Description This column outlines the process and perceived benefits of nursing students and practicing nurses partnering to bring evidence based practices to the clinical setting. The perspective of both the practicing nurse and the nursing student are shared. This work illustrates the importance of socializing students to the professional role of the nurse during prelicensure nursing education as well as promoting the professional growth of practicing nurses.
Faculty Deborah Raines is an associate professor of nursing and the Dedicated Education Unit faculty member at Sisters of Charity Hospital. Julie Cardona is a mother-baby nurse at Sisters of Charity Hospital.
Student Sarah Barclay, Kimberly Izquirdo, and Kristy O’Hagen were juniors enrolled in the junior clinical practice course focused on maternal newborn nursing at the time this column was written. All three graduated from University at Buffalo with BSN degrees in May 2016.
Funding This work was part of the partnership between the University at Buffalo School of Nursing and the Nursing Leadership at Sisters of Charity Hospital

( 2 )

Recorded at: 7/24/2017
Title Copper Alloy Surfaces Sustain Terminal Cleaning Levels in a Rural Hospital
Citation American Journal of Infection Control, 2016; 44: 11:195-203. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.06.033. Hinsa-Leasure SM, Nartey Q, Vaverka J, Schmidt MG. Grinnell College
Description This study demonstrated that patients in rooms with high touch copper alloy surfaces are exposed to substantially fewer bacteria than patients in rooms with standard surfaces. It also highlighted the ability of copper alloy surfaces to maintain bacterial loads at or near cleanliness standards following terminal cleaning of the hospital room. In other words, copper is key to protecting newly admitted patients from contracting infections and is an integral part of an effective infection-control strategy.
Faculty Shannon Hinsa-Leasure is an associate professor of biology, and Michael G. Schmidt is professor and vice chairman of microbiology and immunology at Medical University of South Carolina.
Student Queenster Nartey received her BA in biological chemistry from Grinnell College in 2016; she is working in a government lab and is in the process of applying to medical and graduate programs. Justin Vaverka is a medical student at the University of Iowa.
Funding Funding for this work was provided by a Grinnell College competitive grant awarded to Hinsa-Leasure.

( 3 )

Recorded at: 7/24/2017
Title Restroom Water Reduction Potential at an Urban University.
Citation Sustainability Journal of Record, 2016; 9: 6:295-304. doi:10.1089/sus.2016.29073.sk. Khan S, Klein-Banai C, Yoshida K. University of Illinois at Chicago
Description A water audit was conducted at UIC campus buildings to help evaluate the potential to conserve water and save the university money. These buildings are unique in many different aspects and together are a good representation of an urban university infrastructure. Data was collected by performing a water audit on faucets, urinals, toilets, and showers and suggest it is necessary to upgrade the majority of the fixtures to meet at least the federal and EPA standards. In one scenario of an audit of a university building, the payback was found to be less than two years with a yearly savings of $72,000 and 9.4 million gallons of water per year.
Faculty Cynthia Klein-Banai is associate chancellor for sustainability and adjunct assistant professor of public health. Kate Yoshida is program coordinator in the Office of Sustainability.
Student As a junior, Shahwaar Khan worked from June 2015 to April 2016 on the project. He graduated in May 2017 with a BS in civil engineering.
Funding This project was supported by a UIC Sustainability Fee that was awarded to Khan.

( 4 )

Recorded at: 4/6/2017
Title Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Teaching Program for Newborn Safe Sleep
Citation Neonatal Network: The Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 2016; 35: 6:Raines DA, Barlow K, Manquen D, Povinelli T, Wagner A. University at Buffalo and Sisters of Charity Hospital
Description This research evaluated the effectiveness of an evidence-based teaching guideline and patient outcomes focused on newborn safe sleep. This was a descriptive study with two data collection points. A convenience sample of 48 new mothers completed both data collection points. The findings of this evaluation study demonstrate that this unit-based teaching program was effective in impacting mothers’ knowledge about and practice of safe sleep for the newborn following discharge from the postpartum unit.
Faculty Deborah A. Raines is an associate professor of nursing and a research mentor for the summer N.U.R.S.E. program. Donna Manquen, Theresa Povinelli, and Ashley Wagner are registered nurses in the Mother-Baby Unit at Sisters of Charity Hospital.
Student Khloe Barlow is a BSN student, class of 2017, in the School of Nursing at the University at Buffalo. Barlow initiated work on this research as a participant in the summer N.U.R.S.E program in 2015.
Funding

( 5 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016
Title Dietary Profiles of First-Generation Asian Indian Adolescents in the United States
Citation Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health., 2016; 0: epubahead of print 3-11-2016, Martyn-Nemeth P, Quinn L, Menon U, Shrestha S, Patel C, Shah G. University of Illinois at Chicago
Description This study sought to examine the dietary patterns, demographic characteristics, and health characteristics of first-generation South Asian Indian (SAI) adolescents living in the United States. SAIs have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and dietary behaviors contribute to this risk profile. A cross-sectional observational study design was employed with 56 adolescents from four community centers in the Chicago metropolitan area. Findings revealed several unhealthy dietary patterns: high saturated fat and sodium intake and insufficient potassium, calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D intake. These trends can be reversed by advocating for greater consumption of low-fat dairy products and more fruits and vegetables.
Faculty Pamela Martyn-Nemeth is assistant professor, and Laurie Quinn is professor at University of Illinois at Chicago. Usha Menon is professor of nursing at the University of Arizona.
Student At the time of this study, Sakun Shrestha and Grishma Sha were graduate students (nursing and public health respectively), and Chaula Patel was an undergraduate nursing student ; the study was part of Patel's honors capstone in 2013-2014. All three students are now working in their respective professions.
Funding This study was supported in part by the University of Chicago: Diabetes Research and Training Center (NIH-NIDDK: P60 DK020595-32S3) and by the UIC College of Nursing Internal Research Support Program (IRSP).

( 6 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016
Title High-Dose Vitamin D2 Supplementation for a Year Does Not Cause Serious Adverse Events Including Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations in African American Men with High Burden of Chronic Disease.
Citation Endocrine Practice., 2016; 22: 5:643-644, Onochie C, Barengolts E, Kukreja S. University of Illinois at Chicago and Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
Description The study assessed the long-term safety of high-dose vitamin D2 supplementation in a double blind placebo controlled randomized trial for African American male veterans with dysglycemia and hypovitaminosis D. All subjects received cholecalciferol (D3) 400 IU as multiple vitamins and either weekly ergocalciferol (D2) 50,000 IU or placebo. The SAEs, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations, were collected from the Computerized Patient Record System at three time points: a year prior to the trial (T0), a year of the trial (T1), and a year after the trial (T2). Correlation and regression analysis supported that high-dose vitamin D supplementation for a year did not cause an increase in serious adverse events in this population with high burden of chronic disease.
Faculty Elena Barengolts is a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the chief of endocrinology at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center. Subhash Kukreja is a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Student As a senior at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Chizelle Onochie participated in the project as a part of independent research for the Honors College. She worked as a volunteer researcher for this project from 2013 to 2016 and currently is a 2019 MD candidate attending Indiana University School of Medicine.
Funding The study was supported by a Merit Review grant funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, and in part by NIH grant number UL1RR029879.

( 7 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016
Title Extra-coding RNAs Regulate Neuronal DNA Methylation Dynamics
Citation Nature Communications., 2016; 7: Savell KE, Gallus NV, Simon R, Brown J, Revanna J, Osborn MK, Song EY, O’Malley JJ, Stackhouse CT, Norvil A, Gowher H, Sweatt JD, Day JJ. University of Alabama at Birmingham
Description The creation of memories in the brain involves addition or removal of methyl groups at precise spots on chromosomal DNA. But what controls the careful targeting of these neuronal DNA methylation dynamics?ecRNAs, they say, are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in the adult brain through interaction with DNA methyltransferase enzymes, and the ecRNAs may offer a promising future therapeutic avenue to treat neuropsychiatric disease states associated with changes in DNA methylation.
Faculty Jeremy J. Day is an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Student Rhiana Simon and Jasmin Revanna are undergraduate researchers in UAB's Undergraduate Neuroscience Program. Rhiana Simon has matriculated to graduate school at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and Jasmin Revanna continues her research in Day's lab until her graduation in 2019.
Funding This work was supported by NIH grants DA034681, DA039650, MH091122 and MH57014; DARPA grant HR0011-12-1-0015; and startup funds from UAB and the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Research Foundation.

( 8 )

Recorded at: 12/21/2016
Title Obesity Weighs Down Memory through a Mechanism Involving the Neuroepignetic Dysregulation of Sirt1.
Citation Journal of Neuroscience., 2016; 4: 36:1324-1335, Heyward FD, Gilliam D, Coleman MA, Gavin CF, Wang J, Kaas G, Trieu R, Lewis J, Moulden J, Sweatt JD. University of Alabama at Birmingham
Description How does obesity make memory goes bad, and what are the underlying molecular mechanism that drive this decline? Researchers found that epigenetic changes dysregulate memory-associated genes, and a particular enzyme in brain neurons of the hippocampus appears to be a link between chronic obesity and cognitive decline. Specifically, they found reduced amounts of one particular memory-associated gene product—SIRT1—as the principal pathogenic cause of obesity-induced memory impairment.
Faculty J. David Sweatt is chair of the Department of Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University. Cristin Gavin is an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology and co-director of the Undergraduate Neuroscience Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Jing Wang is a research associate in UAB's Department of Neurobiology. Garrett Kaas is research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University.
Student Frankie D. Heyward is a PhD candidate in neuroscience at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). John Lewis is pursuing graduate studies to become a genetic counselor. Jerome Moulden is a graduate student at UAB. Daniel Gilliam and Richard Trieu conducted this research as part of the Undergraduate Neuroscience Program and Science and Technology Honors Program at UAB. Gilliam matriculated in Harvard's doctoral program in neuroscience this fall, and Trieu will be graduating in spring 2017.
Funding This work was supported by NIH grants T32HL105349, MH57014, P60DK079626, P30DK56336.

( 9 )

Recorded at: 9/28/2016
Title An Automated Method to Assay Locomotor Activity in Third Instar Drosophila melanogaster Larvae
Citation Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods., 2016; 77: 76-80, Graham, S, Rogers RP, Alper, RH.. University of Saint Joseph
Description The present study applied an automated activity tracking system to assess the locomotor activity of 3rd instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Wild-type and a mutant containing a single-point mutation in the picrotoxin binding site of the GABA-A receptor were treated with picrotoxin (PTX) or its vehicle. Consistent with a previous report, it was found that PTX decreased activity in third instar Drosophila larvae due to selective blockade of GABA-A receptors. By using automated data acquisition, we have refined and enhanced an in vivo, high-throughput screen for antiseizure compounds.
Faculty Richard Alper is an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences
Student Graham conducted most of the experiments and wrote the initial draft of the manuscript in partial fulfillment of her BS in biology at the University of Saint Joseph. Postdoctoral fellow Rogers contributed her knowledge of fruit-fly husbandry and genetics, and played a major role in editing the manuscript during and after she had an adjunct appointment in the Department of Biology at the University of Saint Joseph. The research was completed during summer and fall 2015. Graham is working as a patient-care technician in a hospital in Florida. Rogers is an assistant professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston.
Funding The research was supported by funds provided to Graham and Alper from the University of Saint Joseph.

( 10 )

Recorded at: 9/28/2016
Title Provision of Information Regarding Electronic Cigarettes from Shop Employees in New York City
Citation Public Health, 2016; 1: 1-3, Basch, CH, Kecojevic, A, Menafro, A.. William Paterson University
Description The study assessed the knowledge of shop employees in New York City regarding electronic cigarettes. The project surveyed employees' knowledge of the long-term effects of electronic cigarettes and their relative safeety overall compared to traditional cigarettes. The findings revealed that shop employees may influence the sales of electronic cigarettes by downplaying potential hazards due to limited research on electronic cigarettes.
Faculty Corey Basch is a professor of the Department of Public Health.
Student In 2015-16 Anthony Menafro assisted Basch with the research as an undergraduate, through funds provided by William Paterson University's Department of Public Health. Menafro graduated from William Paterson in May 2016 and holds a BS in public health and a BA in psychology.
Funding William Paterson University Department of Public Health

( 11 )

Recorded at: 9/22/2016
Title Fluoxetine Exposure During Adolescence Increases Preference for Cocaine in Adulthood
Citation Scientific Reports, 2015; 5: 15009:Iñiguez SD, Riggs LM, Nieto SJ, Wright KN, Zamora NN, Cruz B, Zavala AR, Robison AJ, Mazei-Robison MS.. California State University San Bernardino
Description We examined whether exposure to the antidepressant Prozac (Fluoxetine), during adolescence specifically, would influence responses to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, later in life. Using a preclinical model, we found that adolescent exposure to Fluoxetine increases sensitivity to the rewarding properties of cocaine in adulthood. As such, our findings indicate that juvenile exposure to antidepressant medications may result in enduring side effects that may potentially influence drug-seeking behavior in adulthood.
Faculty Sergio Iñiguez is an associate professor of psychology.
Student Lace M. Riggs, RISE scholar (2015). Psychology grad student in the MA in General Experimental program (CSUSB). Seven J. Nieto (2014), DIDARP scholar. Currently in the PhD program at the University of Houston (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience program; Department of Psychology). Norma N. Zamora (2013), undergraduate research volunteer, currently in the PhD program (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology) at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). Bryan Cruz, RISE scholar (2014), currently in PhD program (Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology) at the University of Texas at El Paso.
Funding The research was supported by the NIH-NIGMS Grant 1SC2GM109811.

( 12 )

Recorded at: 9/22/2016
Title Nurse Practitioners Recognize, Address Depression-Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults
Citation Circulation, 2015; 132: A17979, Novosel LM, Smialek SA.. University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing
Description Depression is a risk factor for as well as a comorbidity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older adults. This mixed-methods study examined nurse practitioner (NP) knowledge, screening, and risk reduction behaviors related to depression and CVD in older adults from a national sample of actively practicing NPs. NPs were confident in their ability to address classic CVD risks and stressed the importance of a quality patient relationship in depression care. As the fastest growing segment of primary care providers, they felt prepared to incorporate depression into CVD risk reduction practices but reported a lack of depression counseling resources to optimize depression care.
Faculty Dr. Novosel is a faculty member of the Department of Health Promotion and Development.
Student Salina A. Smialek is a senior BSN student (graduating in 2016), who has been actively involved in the Undergraduate Research Mentorship Program (URMP) for four years. She actively participated in subject recruitment and data collection with Dr. Novosel onsite at the AANP national conference and assisted in data entry and analysis. Salina was also awarded the 2015 Mary Opal Wolanin Scholarship (Undergraduate) at the 2015 National Gerontological Nursing Association's (NGNA) Convention in Indianapolis.
Funding This study was funded by the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation/Astellas Promoting Heart Health across the Age Span Award, and for URMP: University of Pittsburgh Provost Funds and School of Nursing.

( 13 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Laundering habits of student nurses and correlation with the presence of Staphylococcus aureus on nursing scrub tops pre-and postlaundering
Citation American Journal of Infection Control, 2015; 43: 1006-1008, Scott E, Goodyear N, Nicoloro JM, Marika DJ, Killion E, Duty SM.. Simmons College and University of Massachusetts Lowell
Description Little is known about student nurse laundering practices. In this study, student nurses swabbed their scrub tops after clinicals and after laundering, and completed a laundry survey; 13.5% of students wore the same scrub more than once and few followed recommended guidelines by using hot water (20%) or bleach (5.6%) when laundering scrubs. After clinical shifts, 17% of swabs tested positive for Staphylococcus aureus; however. laundering eradicated it from 64.3% of positive samples but this was not statistically significant. As a result of this study, we recommend that nurse educators should include safe laundering practices in foundations of nursing courses.
Faculty Elizabeth Scott is an associate professor of biology and public health at Simmons College, Nancy Goodyear is an associate professor of clinical laboratory sciences at UMASS Lowell, Susan Duty is an associate professor of nursing at Simmons College
Student Desta Marika is employed as a nurse. Emma Killion is employed as a nurse.
Funding This research was supported by an industry grant from Procter & Gamble.

( 14 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title The role of Soluble, Insoluble fibers and their Bioactive Compounds in Cancer: A Mini Review
Citation Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2015; 6: 1-11, Papandreou D, Tul Noor Z, Rashed M.. Zayed University
Description This article reviewed the role of different types of fiber such as, cellulose, lignin, pectin and inulin in the development and prevention of different types of cancers. In addition, it discussed the effectiveness of both types of fiber in cancer.
Faculty Dimitrios Papandreou is an Associate Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics
Student Zujaja and Maitha are both undegraduate students in the Public health and Nutrition Program. This review was a project requirement in one of their courses and took place in Spring 2014.
Funding No funding source

( 15 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Validation of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Vitamin D and Calcium Intake in Healthy Female College Students
Citation Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2014; 5: 2048-2052, Papandreou D, Rachaniotis N, Lari M, Al Mussabi W.. Zayed University
Description The objective of this study was to examine the reproducibility and validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and assess calcium and vitamin D intake in health female college students.
Faculty Dimitrios Papandreou is an Associate Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics. Nicholas Rachaniotis is an Assistant Professors of Statistics
Student Maryam and Wafa are both undergraduate students in the Public Health and Nutrition Program. They undertook this work as a student research assistants for this particular project.
Funding This research was supported by a Start Up Grant of Zayed University

( 16 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title A review of the role of fiber, phytochemicals and omega 3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease.
Citation Experimental & Clinical Cardiology, 2014; 20: 8:2181-2193, Papandreou D, Almessabi H, Al Saad S, AlShehhi A, Almansoori A.. Zayed University
Description The objective of this review is to present an updated overview of the potential effect of fiber, omega 3 fatty acids and phytochemicals in reducing the incidence of CVD through diet.
Faculty Dimitrios Papandreou is an Associate Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics. Nicholas Rachaniotis is an Assistant Professors of Statistics
Student Hannadi, Shamma, Aaesha and Alya are all undergraduate students of Public Health and Nutrition Program. This job was undertaken a part of a project in one of their courses in Fall 2013.
Funding No Funding source

( 17 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title The Quality of Ornamental Water within Shopping Malls in the United Arab Emirates
Citation Journal of Virology and Mycology, 2014; 3: 132:Al Rumaithi F, and Al Anouti F. Zayed University
Description The objective of this study was to examine water quality from indoor ornamental fountains within shopping malls in Abu Dhabi (UAE), and compare the different guidelines implemented with regards to microbial quality assurance and public safety. The study emphasized the important need for establishing proper guidelines for ornamental water within indoor malls in Abu Dhabi to ensure public safety at all times.
Faculty Assistant Professor at the department of Natural Science and Public Health Department, College of Sustainability Sciences and Humanities
Student Fatema Al Rumaithi is currently employed as environmental safety officer and was a student at the time of the research specializing in Health Sciences. The research was completed in 2014 as a senior research project towards graduation
Funding NA

( 18 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title A Preliminary Exploration of Heavy Metal Contamination within Aviccenia marina in the United Arab Emirates.
Citation Environmental and Analytical Toxicology., 2014; 4: 232:Al Hosani M, and Al Anouti F. Zayed University
Description In this study, the concentrations of certain heavy metals zinc, copper, lead and chromium in the grey mangrove Avicennia marina were measured in order to better evaluate bioaccumulation and develop a better understanding of heavy metal contamination .
Faculty Fatme Al Anouti is an assistant professor at the department of Natural Science amd Public Health, College of Sustainability Sciences and Humanities and
Student Mariam Al Hosani is Industrial Hygienist at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd., Abu Dhabi, UAE. She conducted the research in 2012 as a senior project to fulfill requirements of BSc. in Health Sciences.
Funding

( 19 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title The Environmental Impact of Urbanization within Abu Dhabi on the Microbial Profile of Man-Made Beaches
Citation International Journal of Environmental Pollution and Remediation., 2014; 2: Al Marzooqi F, and Al Anouti F.. Zayed University, College of Sustainability Science and Humanities
Description This study aims to investigate the effects of urban development of beaches within Abu Dhabi on the microbial profile of the soil. It is hypothesized that microbial growth would be higher in man-made beaches as compared to natural beaches.
Faculty Fatme Al Anouti is an assisstant professor at the department of Natural Science and Public Health, Zayed university
Student Fatema Al Marzooqi is a MSc. candidate at MASDAR institute, ABu Dhabi and was a student in the Environmental Science and Sustainability major in 2013 when she conducted the research
Funding Funded by National research Foundation Grant in support of young Emirati researchers

( 20 )

Recorded at: 3/7/2016
Title Perceived Benefits and Barriers of Heart Failure Self-Care During and After Hospitalization
Citation Home Healthcare Nurse., 2014; 32: 8:482-488, Elliot KM, Flimlin HE, Sethares KA. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Description The current longitudinal study examined patients with a diagnosis of heart failure and their perceived benefits and barriers to self-care throughout hospitalization. The main instrument used to examine patient's benefits and barriers to self-care was the Health Belief Scale. Quantitative data collection was used to interview patients and examine factors affecting the decision to engage in and adhere to self care habits. Concluded results suggest that patients performing self-care habits reduced symptom exacerbation and improved overall quality of life.
Faculty Heather E. Flimlin graduated with her Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 2013 from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth where she spent three years working as a research assistant reviewing topics including: cultural competence in nursing, nurse indicators in nursing care for positive perinatal outcomes as well as heart failure self-care.
Student Heather attended the Heart Failure Society of America Scientific Assembly in Boston, Massachusetts as well as placed third for undergraduate research presentations at the 2012 Sister Madeleine Clemence Vaillot Scholarship Day. Heather currently works as a Registered Nurse at St. Peter’s University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey on the Labor & Delivery Unit.
Funding The research was funded by a grant from The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Foundation and Theta Kappa Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International.

( 21 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.
Citation Gene Therapy, 2014; 21: 2:188-194, Ledley FD, McNamee LM, Uzdil V, Morgan IW. Bentley University
Description This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. An analytical model of technology maturation shows that gene therapy technologies have matured steadily since the 1980s. This maturation, however, as been negatively correlated with capital investments in gene therapy companies and clinical investigations of candidate products. This asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and the business models for product development may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy.
Faculty Fred Ledley is Director of the Center for Integration of Science and Industry. He is also Professor in the Departments of Natural & Applied Sciences and Management
Student Vedat Uzdil was an undergraduate researcher in the Center for Integration of Science and Industry. He is currently a Consultant with Ernst & Young in Istanbul, Turkey.
Funding This work was supported by a grant from the National Biomedical Research Foundation and the Jeanne and Dan Valente Center at Bentley University

( 22 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Ligation of the left circumflex coronary artery with subsequent MRI and histopathology in rabbits.
Citation Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science., 2010; 49: 838-844, Hu N, Straub CM, Garzarelli AA, Sabey KH, Yockman JW, Bull DA.. University of Utah
Description Atherosclerotic plague in the coronary artery causes narrow­ing of its lumen, resulting in failure to supply adequate oxygen and nutrients to the heart. This limitation accounts for the clinical manifestations of myocardial infarction. To understand the structure–function relationship in the postinfarcted myocardium in rabbits, we induced cardiac ischemia by ligating the left circumflex coronary artery. We studied the distinct myocardial segments of the left ventricle to understand the 3D depiction of myocardial macrostructure and to gain insights into the structure–function relationships in the myocardium following myocardial infarction.
Faculty Norman Hu is Research Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine.
Student Kyle H. Sabey was a recipient of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award from the University of Utah. He wrote an Honors Thesis, and his work was selected for presentation at Posters on the Hill at the Utah State Legislature. He is currently an osteopathic medical student.
Funding The research was supported by the Department Pediatrics and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program at the University of Utah.

( 23 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rabbits.
Citation Comparative Medicine., 2012; 62: 116-123, Hu N, Sabey KH, Curtis HR, Hoang N, Dowdle SB, Garzarelli AA, Buswell HR, Dibella E, Yockman JW, Bull DA.. University of Utah
Description Atherosclerotic plague in the coronary artery causes narrow­ing of its lumen, resulting in failure to supply adequate oxygen and nutrients to the heart. This limitation accounts for the clinical manifestations of myocardial infarction. To understand the structure–function relationship in the postinfarcted myocardium in rabbits, we induced cardiac ischemia by ligating the left circumflex coronary artery. We studied the distinct myocardial segments of the left ventricle to understand the 3D depiction of myocardial macrostructure and to gain insights into the structure–function relationships in the myocardium following myocardial infarction.
Faculty Norman Hu is Research Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine.
Student Kyle H. Sabey was a recipient of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) award from the University of Utah. He wrote an Honors Thesis, and his work was selected for presentation at Posters on the Hill at the Utah State Legislature. He is currently an osteopathic medical student.
Funding The research was supported by the Department of Pediatrics and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program at the University of Utah.

( 24 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Antimitotic activity of structurally simplified biaryl analogs of the anticancer agents colchicine and combretastatin A4.
Citation Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters., 2014; 10: 90:McNulty J, van den Berg S, Ma D, Tarade D, Joshi S, Church J, Pandey S.. University of Windsor
Description Among the most important anti-cancer drugs recently discovered is the natural compound combretastatin A4 (CA4), which was isolated from the South African tree Combretum Caffrum. CA4 has been evaluated as an anti-cancer agent, but has been largely ineffective as a monotherapy because of its short half-life in the human body. Chemists at McMaster University have recently synthesized structurally simplified biaryl analogues of CA4 that are expected to be more stable. Preliminary results reveal that these analogues are effective at causing cancer cell apoptosis in osteocarcoma and leukemia cell lines, while sparing the noncancerous cells tested. These findings are important as they represent the first instance in which biaryl analogues of CA4 were shown to be effective anti-cancer compounds.
Faculty Dr. James McNulty is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at McMaster University. Sean van den Berg is a graduate student working with Dr. McNulty. Dr. Siyaram Pandey is a University of Windsor professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Dennis Ma is a PhD student working under his supervision.
Student Seema Joshi and Julia Church both conducted their research as part of their Honours Thesis project during their last year of undergraduate studies at the University of Windsor. Both Joshi and Church are currently enrolled in medical school. Tarade is an Outstanding Scholar at the University of Windsor, and is currently working on his undergraduate thesis and applying to graduate school.
Funding Dennis Ma was funded by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Daniel Tarade’s summer research project was supported by a USRA grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

( 25 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Appropriate Disinfection Techniques for Playing Surfaces to Prevent the Transmission of Bloodborne Pathogens
Citation International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training., 2014; 19: 12-15, Grindle M, Games KE, Eberman LE, Kahanov L. Indiana State University
Description This research provides a review of appropriate disinfection techniques for multiple playing surfaces. The significance of this work is that it provides athletic trainers and other sports medicine providers descriptions on how to prevent the spread of pathogens such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) via contact with infected playing surfaces like field turf, ice, and swimming pool water.
Faculty Dr. Kenneth Games, Assistant Professor Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation and Director of Clinical Education Post-Professional Athletic Training. Dr. Lindsey Eberman, Associate Professor Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation and Program Director of the Post-Professional Athletic Training program.
Student Mikayla Grindle is currently a senior within the professional athletic training program. The work took place during her junior year (2013-2014). The opportunity to complete the research was taken via her own ambition and curiosity based on a clinical (practicum) experience and was not associated with any curricular or co-curricular agency.
Funding

( 26 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title Communication quality improvement in student nursing clinicals
Citation Journal of Nursing Education and Practice., 2014; 4: 9:44-48, Marnocha SK, Marnocha MR, Mason M. University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
Description Little previous research has examined attempts to improve the quality of communication among nursing clinical students, unit-based educators, and academic educators. The current study utilized focus groups and needs assessments to identify communication concerns of both academic and unit-based clinical educators in several inpatient settings.
Faculty Suzanne Marnocha is a Professor of Nursing and the Assistant Dean in the College of Nursing, Mark Marnocha is a Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and Public Health at the University of WI. Madison and Mike Mason is a staff RN in the Intensive Care Unit at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Appleton WI.
Student Mike Mason was a McNair Scholar and full time nursing student in the UG program at UW Oshksoh. From Mr. Mason's junior year (2012) and after graduation (2013) he participated as a research team member and assisted in writing the article that was published. Mike is currently a staff RN in the ICU at St Elizabeth's thereby completing mandatory clinical before applying to a Certified Nurse Anestetist masters program.
Funding Self funded by the Drs. Marnocha

( 27 )

Recorded at: 2/27/2015
Title South Africa's Return to Primary Care: The Struggles and Strides of the Primary Health Care System
Citation The Journal of Global Health., 2014; 4: 1:10-14, Maillacheruvu PF, McDuff, EM. Truman State University
Description This paper provides a discussion of the history and current issues of the primary health care system in South Africa. It includes personal observations from the author's experiences in Cape Town, where she traveled and worked in a large public primary health care facility in May and June 2013. Together, the analysis found that two major opportunities for the growth of the nation's primary care system are (1) closing the gap between private and public health care and (2) attenuating the burden of chronic infectious disease, namely HIV and TB.
Faculty Elaine McDuff is a professor of sociology and chair of the Sociology/Anthropology department.
Student Maillacheruvu traveled to Cape Town as part of a study abroad program sponsored by Truman State University in May and June 2013. She is currently attending medical school at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
Funding The study abroad component of this project was supported by Truman State University's Pershing Scholarship, which was awarded to Maillacheruvu.

( 28 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Homeotic Gene teashirt (tsh) has a neuroprotective function in amyloid-beta 42 mediated neurodegeneration.
Citation PLoS ONE, 2013; 8: 11::e80829., Moran MT, Tare M, Kango-Singh M, Singh A.. University of Dayton
Description Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s) responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. We have identified tsh and tio as new genetic modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. Our studies demonstrate a novel neuroprotective function of tsh and its paralog tio in Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. The neuroprotective function of tsh is independent of its role in retinal determination.
Faculty Dr. Amit Singh is an Associate Professor of Cell Biology, Dr. Madhuri Kango-Singh is an Assistant Professor of Genetics at Department of Biology
Student Michael Moran (first author) is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Dayton (UD). Meghana Tare was PhD student at University of Dayton. Kango-Singh is tenure track Assistant Professor and Singh is Associate Professors at University of Dayton. Student performed the work for two years.
Funding This work was supported by NIH R15 grant to Amit Singh and University of Dayton Honor's program, University of Dayton Start up to Dr. Amit Singh and Dr. Madhuri Kango-Singh

( 29 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Stairway step dimensions: Replication of a measurement systems study
Citation Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society., 2013; 57: 575-579, Hicks CL, Jensen RC, Adams JM.. Montana Tech of the University of Montana
Description This study replicated a prior measurement system study examining the nosing-to-nosing measurement method for determining uniformity of step dimensions within a stairway. In each study a graduate student and an undergraduate student twice measured each step in six flights in campus buildings. The replication confirmed the prior study in that the percentage of variance due to repeatability and reproducibility was similar.
Faculty Roger Jensen is a professor in the Safety, Health, and Industrial Hygiene Department.
Student Christopher Hicks led the study for his thesis in industrial hygiene. Josey Adams participated in the project as part of her senior project in occupational safety and health. The experiment took place in the spring of 2012. Chris is currently employed by Aera Energy, and Josey works for ConocoPhillips.
Funding Both students were partially funded by Training Grant No. T03/OH008630 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

( 30 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Mechanisms of hemolysis-associated platelet activation
Citation Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 2013; 11: 2148-2154, Helms CC, Marvel M, Zhao W, Stahle M, Vest R, Kato GJ, Lee JS, Christ G, Gladwin MT, Hantgan RR, Kim-Shapiro DB. Wake Forest University
Description Red blood cell hemolysis occurs in many pathological conditions including in hemolytic anemias like sickle cell disease and in transfusion of older stored. In this work, we determined that hemolysis leads to platelet activation via release of ADP and nitric oxide scavenging, cell-free hemoglobin. Platelet activation in hemolysis contributes to pathology through thrombotic and inflammatory pathways.
Faculty Daniel Kim-Shapiro is a professor of Physics and Harbert Family Distinguished Chair at Wake Forest University
Student Madison Marvel worked on this project during her sophomore and junior years at Wake Forest. She is now in her third year at Wake Forest and will graduate in May and then attend Medical school at Southern Illinois University.
Funding This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant HL058091.

( 31 )

Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Manipulating In-House Designed Drug Databases For The Prediction Of pH-Dependent Aqueous Drug Solubility
Citation American Journal of Health Sciences, 2013; 4: 3:137-150, D'Souza MJ, AlAbed GJ, Earley M, Roberts R, Gerges FJ.. Wesley College
Description One goal of this project was to create a database with searchable parameters in order to predict anticancer activity of a drug based on its chemical structure. Initial results were published in Pharmaceutical Reviews and the US Government Accountability Office picked up this work and used it to criticize the FDA (http://srxawordonhealth.com/2010/07/26/fda-criticized-by-the-government-accountability-office/). A second goal was to create an online database so that clinicians could add (or improve on existing) data.
Faculty Malcolm J. D'Souza is professor of chemistry and director of sponsored research at Wesley College. Natalia Roberts is an assistant professor of biochemistry at Georgetown University. Fady J. Gerges is director of surgical pathology at Doctors Pathology Services.
Student Ghada J. AlAbed completed this project as a senior and graduated in 2010. She is currently employed as laboratory supervisor of the science labs at Wesley College. Melissa Earley completed her part of the project in her senior year. She is currently employed as a software developer at Highmark Blue Shield in Delaware.
Funding Supported by grants from the National Institute of General Medical Science (8 P20 GM103446-13) at the National Institutes of Health.

( 32 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title CD33 Alzheimer’s risk-altering polymorphism, CD33 expression and exon 2 splicing
Citation Journal of Neuroscience, 2013; 33: 33:13320-5, Malik M, Simpson JF, Parikh I, Wilfred BR, Fardo, DW, Nelson PT, and Estus S.. University of Kentucky
Description Genome wide studies have identified novel Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk factors. We elucidated the mechanism of action of the AD-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3865444 in the CD33 promoter. Analysis of CD33 expression in human brain identified a common isoform lacking exon 2 (D2-CD33). The proportion of CD33 expressed as D2-CD33 correlated robustly with rs3865444. Sequencing established rs12459419 in exon 2 is co-inherited with rs3865444. Minigene RNA splicing studies established that rs12459419 is a functional SNP that modulates exon 2 splicing. In summary, these results suggest a novel model wherein SNP-modulated RNA splicing modulates CD33 function and, thereby, AD risk.
Faculty David Fardo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics. Peter Nelson is a Professor in the Department of Pathology. Steven Estus is a Professor in the department of Physiology.
Student Manasi Malik is an undergraduate at the University of Kentucky, majoring in Biology. James Simpson is a research associate at the University of Kentucky. Ishita Parikh is a graduate student at the University of Kentucky. Bernard R. Wilfred is a Post-Doctoral Scholar at the University of Kentucky.
Funding This work was made possible by funding from NIH (P01-AGO30128 (SE), P30-AG028383 (DWF, PTN), P20-GM103436 (DWF)) and the UK Bucks for Brains program (MM).

( 33 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The evolutionary role of physician assistants across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.
Citation International Journal of Exercise Science., 2013; 6: 1:1-8, Gerrie BJ, Holbrook EA.. Roanoke College
Description Through this review, the evolution of the position of Physician Assistant is discussed from the perspective of healthcare systems in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. An outline of the educational requirements, projected student debt-to-income ratios, and position availability is also provided.
Faculty Elizabeth A. Holbrook is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Human Performance at Roanoke College in Salem, VA.
Student Brayden Gerrie is a current senior majoring in Exercise Science at Roanoke College and is preparing to enter a PA graduate program. Brayden pursued this paper during his junior year as a capstone to his internship experience at the Methodist Hospital of Houston, TX.
Funding No funding was provided to support this study.

( 34 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Stress in higher education: a study of mismatched instruction as a contributing factor in female Emirati undergraduate students
Citation Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, 2013; 10: 1:ALAlami U, AL-Salah M, Rahal T. Zayed University
Description The aim of this project was to study the relationship between learning styles, teaching methods and level of students’ stress. More specifically, the effect of mismatched instruction on students’ stress levels was investigated.
Faculty Dr Usama ALAlami is an Associate Professor at the Department of Natural Science and Public Health, College f Sustainability Sciences and Humanities, Zayed University.
Student Mahaba AL-Saleh is an undergraduate student studying in her third year on the Public Health and Nutrition Major. She was interviewed and appointed as the research Assistant. She assisted extensively in the collection and analysis of the data as well as providing reflection and interpretation.
Funding The project was kindly funded by the Zayed University Research Incentive Fund, a two year grant that was awarded in 2010.

( 35 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Increased Incidence and Altered Risk Demographics of Childhood Lead Poisoning: Predicting the Impacts of the CDC’s 5 µg/dL Reference Value in Massachusetts
Citation International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health., 2012; 9: 11:3934- 3942, Handler P, Brabander D.. Wellesley College
Description The impacts of the CDC’s new sliding scale lead poisoning reference value on the prevalence and demographic risk of childhood lead poisoning were examined for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. We found that the new 5 µg/dL benchmark will lead to a 1470% increase in childhood lead poisoning cases among 9–47 month-olds in MA, with nearly 50% of the examined communities experiencing an increased prevalence of lead poisoning. Further, the new highest risk communities have significantly fewer foreign-born residents and significantly larger white populations than the former highest risk communities. The new lead poisoning benchmark will drastically increase the number of children with elevated blood lead levels and alter the distribution and demographics of high-risk communities in MA.
Faculty Daniel Brabander is an Associate Professor of Geosciences and Environmental Studies at Wellesley College
Student This research was completed by Phoebe Handler, Environmental Studies major, Wellesley College class of 2012 as part of an honors senior thesis. Phoebe is currently studying nursing and is pursuing publication of other portions of her thesis work.
Funding The work was funded in part by a research stipend from the Frost Endowed Environmental Sciences/Studies Fund.

( 36 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome with Low Level Laser Therapy: A Case Report
Citation Int J Athlet Ther Train., 2012; 17: 4:28-31, Moore J, Demchak TJ.. Indiana State University
Description Fibromyalgia Syndrome is typically treated pharmacologically. Low Level Laser could serve as a non-pharmacological treatment for Fibromyalgia Syndrome. The Low Level Laser treatments decreased pain and increased function in our patient.
Faculty Timothy Demchak is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is affiliated with the Athletic Training program at the time the study was conducted. Currently, he is considered a faculty member in the Physician Assistant program.
Student Jesse Moore completed an internship during the summer of 2011 with Dr. Demchak at the St. Ann Medical Center. The case study was from a patient that he evaluated and helped treat throughout the summer. Jesse is currently a Senior Athletic Training major and is assigned to ISU football for his clinical.
Funding The internship was funded with an Indiana State University Community Engagement Grant.

( 37 )

Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Slosh Tube
Citation NATA News, 2012; 50: Mass CJ, Gage M, Leo J.. Indiana State University
Description While on a summer internship with PiFit, an organization that works to provide Sports Medicine to professional race car drivers, Carol worked to create and implement a inexpensive but effective rehabilitation tool. In the subsequent Fall semester, Carol used this tool for a research project in Dr. Matt Gage’s class. The two collaborated to provide this tool in our professional magazine.
Faculty Dr. Matt Gage is an assistant professor in the Dept of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation.
Student Carol completed the project as a Junior and is now in Senior standing at the University.
Funding

( 38 )

Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Fourier Analysis of Phase Resetting Curves of Type II Oscillators
Citation 2012; Raidt R, Oprisan SA.. College of Charleston
Description Neurons are complex biological cells specializing in information processing through transient changes in the firing frequency due to inputs received from other neurons. We mapped the firing rate changes graphically using a phase resetting curve (PRC) and used it to predict the synchronous firing of a large network that occurs during epileptic seizures. Our work focused on investigating numerically the relationship between the PRC and biologically relevant control parameters. We described and analyzed the PRCs using Fourier coefficients, predicted the phase-locked modes of the networks, and compared the results against actual neural activity in the fully connected network. Our mathematical predictions were reasonably correct for networks of Type II, or bursting, neurons.
Faculty Dr. Sorinel A. Oprisan is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.
Student Robert Raidt is Honors College and Physics major interested in pursuing a biomedical career. He worked in computational neuroscience lab performing numerical simulations (2009-2012), and completed a Bachelor Essay for Honors College in this research field. Robert contributed to many presentations and presented at international meetings (American Physical Society, March 2012). He won Sigma Xi & South Carolina Academy of Sciences Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Research in Health Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Award for the Outstanding Male Undergraduate Scientist (April 2012).
Funding Research supported by Howard Hughes Medical Institute summer fellowships through the College of Charleston (2010, 2011) and a research assistantship (2012) financed from NSF CAREER award to Dr. Oprisan.

( 39 )

Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Nitric oxide and angiotensin II regulate cardiovascular homeostasis and the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in conscious lambs
Citation Journal of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System, 2011; 13: 1:99-107, Wehlage SJ, Smith FG. University of Calgary
Description This study evaluated the interaction between two vasoactive factors - angiotensin II and nitric oxide - that together regulate blood pressure. The research findings generated from this study provided the first evidence that, together, angiotensin II and nitric oxide regulate cardiovascular homeostasis as well as the arterial baroreflex of heart rate during the early newborn period which may help to explain the activation of these two systems early in life.
Faculty Francine G. Smith, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Physiology & Pharmacology.
Student Stephanie Wehlage undertook this research over three summers during 2004, 2005 and 2006. She was a recipient of summer studentship support from the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research. Stephanie has since completed her undergraduate medical education program at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, and is preparing for her residency training program.
Funding The student was supported by summer studentships from the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research.

( 40 )

Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Disruption of Nrf2/ARE signaling impairs antioxidant mechanisms and promotes cell degradation pathways in aged skeletal muscle
Citation Biochem. Biophys. Acta- Molecular Basis of Disease., 2012; 1822: 1038-1050, Miller CJ, Gounder SS, Kannan S, Goutam K, Muthusamy VR, Firpo MA, Symons JD, Paine R, Hoidal JR, Rajasekaran NS.. University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
Description Our recently published study was to understand the role of Nrf2, a master transcription factor that regulates a majority of antioxidant/cytoprotective genes. Activation of Nrf2-antioxidant response element signaling is protective against reactive oxygen species/free radicals. The study had used wild-type (control) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-/-) mice at 2 and >22 months of age. A number of biochemical and molecular biology techniques were used to analyze the mechanisms for age dependent Nrf2 regulation. Our findings reveal that the levels and stability of Nrf2 and antioxidnat genes were decreased on aging and induces cell degeneration/death pathways in skeletal muscles. This is significant as Nrf2 could be a potential therapeutic target to protect the skeletal muscle from age-dependent accumulation of free radicals.
Faculty Rajasekaran N. Soorappan (supervisor) is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine at the University of Utah.
Student Corey Miller is a senior Exercise Physiology major and a pre-medical student who has been involved in mouse breeding, genotyping, harvesting tissues and biochemical analysis. Corey worked part-time since June-2010 to present. The co-first author Sellamuthu S. Gounder had performed molecular biology analysis, immunology, statistical analyses and prepared figures for the manuscript since May 2011.
Funding Corey received support from the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) and the Division of Cardiology. This research was supported by Center on Aging, University of Utah and American Heart Association.

( 41 )

Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Advanced computed tomography technology and patient dose: A literature review
Citation Radiol Mgmt., 2011; 33: 5:43-46, Bailey TM, Veale BL.. Midwestern State University
Description Thi literature review examined the relationship between the advancement of technology in CT equipment and increasing dose. CT scan protocols, demands of physicians, equipment capabilities, and possible solutions to address the problem of increasing dose are addressed,
Faculty Thomas M. Bailey, RT (R)(CT) CRA is currently in the Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Sciences at Midwestern State University. Beth L. Vealé, PhD, RT(R)(QM) is associate professor of radiologic sciences, Midwestern State University. She holds the BSRS degree from Midwestern State University, and MEd from the University of North Texam, and a PhD from the University of Nebraska Lincoln
Student Thomas is currently in the BSRS program at Midwestern State University. He is employed as the director of imaging at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle in Columbus, MS. Thomas wrote the original literature as an assignment in a capstone BSRS course.
Funding There was no funding for this project.

( 42 )

Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Athlete assessment of urine color effectively influences planned hydration behaviors.
Citation J Athl Train., 2011; 46: 3:S186, Kelly JL, Eberman LE, Yeargin SW, Vaal TL, Falconer SK.. Indiana State University
Description Athletic trainers educate athletes on hydration practices and self-assessment of urine color to help prevent heat illness. The purpose of this project was to determine the relationship between the practitioner and athlete’s assessment of urine color and to identify athletes’ planned hydration behaviors after self-assessment.
Faculty Lindsey Eberman is assistant professor of Athletic Training and Director of the undergraduate program. Susan Yeargin is assistant professor Athletic Training and Physical Therapy and Director of the Graduate Athletic Training Program.
Student Janie L. Kelly is a recent graduate of the Athletic Training program (2011). As a junior and senior Janie participated in a research group of faculty, graduate and undergraduate students to evaluate hydration practices of professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Janie is currently enrolled as a graduate student at Arizona School of Health Sciences – A.T. Still University in Mesa, AZ in the Post-Professional Athletic Training program.
Funding This project was funded by the Lily Foundation and the Focus Indiana Internship Scholarship Program.

( 43 )

Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Body size and fitness characteristics of National Football League players: An update.
Citation J Athl Train., 2011; 46: S187, Vaal TL, Eberman LE, Yeargin SW, Kelly JL, Howder JR, Young KD, Sibrel DL.. Indiana State University
Description Since the 1970s, the National Football League has been evaluating the physical characteristics of its athletes; however there exits some inconsistency in the variables used to describe fitness. The purpose of this study was to update body size and physical characteristic norms of NFL players using several calculations of fitness: waist to hip ratio, body mass index, and body surface area to mass ratio.
Faculty Lindsey Eberman is assistant professor of athletic traing. She is the Director of the Undergraduate Athletic Training Program. Susan Yeargin is assistant professor of athletic training and physical therapy. She is the Director of the Graduate Athletic Training Program
Student Tiffani L. Vaal is a recent graduate of the Athletic Training program (2011). She is currently enrolled in the Massage Therapy Certificate Program at Vincennes University while she hopes to return to Indiana State as a student in the inaugural Physical Therapy Class of 2015.
Funding This project was funded by the Lily Foundation and the Focus Indiana Internship Scholarship Program.

( 44 )

Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Chronic alpha-1A adrenergic receptor stimulation improves synaptic plasticity, cognitive function, mood, and longevity
Citation Mol Pharmacol., 2011; 81: Doze VA, Papay RS, Goldenstein BL, Gupta MK, Collette KM, Nelson BW, Lyons MJ, Davis BA, Luger EJ, Wood SG, Haselton JR, Simpson PC, Perez DM.. University of North Dakota
Description The role of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in cognition and mood is unclear. We studied the effects of chronic alpha-1A adrenergic receptor stimulation and found that it improves synaptic plasticity, cognitive function, mood, and longevity. This may afford a therapeutic target for counteracting the decline in cognitive function and mood associated with aging and neurological disorders.
Faculty Van Doze is an Associate Professor and James Haselton an Assistant Professor in Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics at the University of North Dakota. Paul Simpson is a Professor at the University of California San Francisco. Robert Papay is a Laboratory Technician, Manveen Gupta a Postdoctoral Fellow, and Dianne Perez a Professor in Molecular Cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.
Student Brianna Goldenstein, Katie Collette and Brian Nelson are currently graduate students in Pharmacology, Physiology & Therapeutics at the University of North Dakota. Mariaha Lyons recently started medical school at the University of Minnesota. Bethany Davis is a senior undergraduate student at the University of North Dakota. Elizabeth Luger is employed while finishing a PREP program at the Mayo Clinic and in the process of applying to graduate programs. Sarah Wood is currently in a PREP program at Wright State University.
Funding This research was supported by NSF Faculty Early Career Development Award, NSF REU Site Award, NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Awards, NIH NCRR INBRE P20RR016471, and the NHLB Institute.

Back to Highlight Categories Page
© 2011 The Council of Undergraduate Research. All Rights Reserved.