Learning Through Research

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Undergraduate Research Highlights

Biology Highlights

Total Listing: 147 (Listed by the order of record adding time, Descending)

( 1 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Diet-induced obesity alters skeletal muscle fiber types of male but not female mice
Citation Physiological Reports, 2014; 2: 1:e00204, DeNies MS, Johnson J, Maliphol AB, Bruno M, Kim A, Rizvi A, Rustici K, Medler S. SUNY Fredonia
Description In the current study, we investigated the long-term effects of a high-fat diet and subsequent obesity on the muscle fiber types in C57 BLK/6J mice. Single fibers were harvested from the soleus and plantaris muscles, and fiber types were determined using SDS-PAGE. The high-fat diet mice were significantly heavier than the control mice (39.17 g vs. 56.87 g; P < 0.0003), but muscle masses were not different. In male mice, the high-fat diet was associated with a significantly lower proportion of slow, type I fibers in the soleus muscle (40.4% vs. 29.33%; P < 0.0165). The reported trends indicate that type I fibers are most susceptible to the effects of obesity, and that these fiber-type changes can be sex specific.
Faculty Scott Medler is an assistant professor of biology
Student Undergraduate students (DeNies, Johnson, Bruno, Kim, Rizvi, and Rustici) participated in this study as part of their undergraduate research credit.
Funding

( 2 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Plasticity in the cerebellum and primary somatosensory cortex relating to habitual and continuous slender branch climbing in laboratory mice (Mus musculus)
Citation The Anatomical Record., 2013; 296: 822-833, Byron CD, VanValkinburgh D, Northcutt K, Young V.. Mercer University
Description This study examined how histological aspects of the brain can vary in mice raised in climbing habitats containing very narrow branches (<2.5 mm) compared to control animals housed in terrestrial settings. In the arboreal setting mice learned to use grasping feet combined with more coordinated tail movements to balance and travel above substrates during daily activities throughout post-weaning ontogeny. Results showed that cortical regions of interest with respect to the sensorimotor system that coordinates the hindlimb and tail are different in the arboreal mice. Combined with other research from Byron’s lab these results suggest that in a house mouse model unspecialized for climbing the central nervous system is capable of greater phenotypic plasticity than musculoskeletal tissues of the hindlimb and tail.
Faculty Craig Byron, Ginger Young, and Katie Northcutt are Associate and Assistant Professors in Mercer University’s department of Biology.
Student Daniel VanValkinburgh carried out the cutting, mounting, and staining of mouse cerebral and cerebellar tissues in over two-dozen specimens producing over ten thousand sections. VanValkinburgh is currently in medical school at the University of Tennessee-Memphis.
Funding This eight-week summer project was funded by Mercer University’s MUBS (Mercer Undergraduate Biomedical Scholars) program in 2011.

( 3 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Abundance and size of sand crabs, Lepidopa benedicti (Decapoda: Albuneidae), in South Texas.
Citation The Southwestern Naturalist., 2013; 58: 4:431-434, Murph JH, Faulkes Z.. The University of Texas-Pan American
Description Sand crabs are a widely spread but little known family of crabs. This was the first research project to study the ecology of any species in this family.
Faculty Zen Faulkes is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology.
Student Murph performed this research as part of an REU program at UTPA in 2009-2010. She is currently a graduate student at Capella University.
Funding Murph was supported by a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates Site grant (award DBI- 0649273).

( 4 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Chronic exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids primes microglia to pro-inflammatory stimuli and induces NLRP3 mRNA in the hippocampus.
Citation Psychoneuroendocrinology., 2014; 40: 191-200, Frank MG, Hershman SA, Weber MD, Watkins LR, Maier SF.. University of Colorado
Description Chronic stress as well as chronic treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) primes the neuroinflammatory response to a subsequent pro-inflammatory challenge. However, it remains unclear whether chronic GCs sensitize the response of key CNS immune substrates (i.e. microglia) to pro-inflammatory stimuli. In the present study, chronic exposure to GCs induced a primed immunophenotype in microglia and sensitized microglia to pro-inflammatory stimuli. The present study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that a permissive function of GCs is that of an endogenous danger signal or alarmin.
Faculty Dr. Matthew G. Frank is a senior research associate in the laboratory of Dr. Steven F. Maier and Dr. Linda R. Watkins in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience.
Student Hershman graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in Integrative Physiology. She worked on this project as an undergraduate research assistant from 2012 to 2014. She is currently applying to medical school and is employed as a Professional Research Assistant.
Funding The research was supported by Fellowship awards from the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program and Biological Sciences Initiative at the University of Colorado Boulder in partnership with Howard Hughes Medical Institute, which were awarded to Hershman.

( 5 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title A new bioassay identifies proliferation ratios of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts
Citation Cell Biology International, 2014; 38: Vaughan MB, Odejimi TD, Morris TL, Sawalha D, Spencer CL.. University of Central Oklahoma
Description This study tested a new method to visualize proliferation and differentiation of myofibroblasts; the assay allows the user to identify 4 different cell types within a population of cells. Treatments that target one of these cell types may now be monitored using this staining assay.
Faculty Mel Vaughan is a Professor of Biology; Tracy Morris is an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics
Student Both Odejimi and Spencer were sophomore undergraduates with UCO student RCSA grants when they began this project; Odejimi continued as a junior McNair Scholar, and Spencer was an LS-OKAMP-funded junior. Sawalha was an MS-degree candidate in Biology. Odejimi will enter Creighton Dental School next semester; Spencer is currently a senior Biomedical Engineering student.
Funding The research was supported by UCO faculty RCSA grant to Vaughan, student RCSA grants to Odejimi and Spencer, McNair Scholar program to Odejimi, and NSF-OK-LSAMP to Spencer.

( 6 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Female juvenile play elicits Fos expression in dopaminergic neurons of the VTA
Citation Behavioral Neuroscience., 2014; 128: 2:178-186, Northcutt KV, Nguyen JM.. Mercer University
Description This study examined the involvement of particular groups of dopamine neurons in juvenile rat play to determine if motivational networks in the brain are activated during play as they are during other social interactions. We found that play increased activity in dopamine neurons of motivational networks in females, but not in males. Dopamine release in this network during play in females likely motivates them to seek out play opportunities again and again. Other neurotransmitter networks, such as those involving vasopressin, may be more important for males.
Faculty Katharine Northcutt is an assistant professor of biology.
Student Nguyen started this project as part of a summer project after her freshman year of college, and finished collecting data during her sophomore year. She recently completed her junior year, and will be applying to graduate programs in her senior year.
Funding The research was supported by Mercer University Biomedical Scholar funds.

( 7 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nestmate-odor memory retrieval but not for olfaction in harvester ants (pogonomyrmex)
Citation BIOS., 2013; 84: 3:158-164, Coates K, Robertson K. Westminster College
Description The present study examines to role of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors in olfactory learning and memory in ants and demonstrates a role for muscarininc receptors in memory retrieval of nestmate-associated odors. Controls comfirm that muscarinc receptors are not required for odor detection. The study supports findings in other insects deminstrating that the role of acetylcholine and its receptors is conserved
Faculty Katherine Robertson is an associate professor of biology
Student Kaylynn Coates was awarded the Tri-Beta Honors Society McClung award for the most outstanding publication in BIOS, 2013. She did the research for her senior Capstone project. She graduateed in 2012 and is currenlty doing a Ph.D. in biology at the University of West Virginai
Funding This project was funded by Westminster College

( 8 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Global assessment of arsenic pollution using sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) as an emerging aquatic model organism.
Citation Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, 2014; 163: 55-63, Savery L.C., Wise J.T.F., Wise S.S., Falank C., Gianios Jr, C., Thompson W.D., Perkins C., Zheng T., Zhu C., Wise Sr., J,P.. University of Southern Maine
Description Arsenic, a naturally occurring metalloid, is an oceanic pollutant of global concern. Arsenic concentrations were analyzed in free-ranging sperm whales (n = 342) in 17 regions worldwide during the voyage of the Odyssey. The global mean concentration was 1.9 ug/g ww, and the Indian Ocean had the highest arsenic levels reaching 13.8 ug/g ww. Arsenic to this region may be from naturally occurring sources and the heavy use of arsenic-containing pesticides and herbicides.
Faculty John P. Wise, Sr., Ph.D. is the director of the Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health and a professor of toxicology and molecular epidemiology in the Department of Applied Medical Sciences.
Student James is currently a graduate student in the Department of Coastal Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi.
Funding The research was supported by Ocean Alliance and the Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health. Work was conducted under NMFS permit #1008-1637-00 (J. Wise, PI) and permit #751-1614 (Iain Kerr).

( 9 )

Recorded at: 9/15/2014
Title Chemical dispersants used in the Gulf of Mexico oil crisis are cytotoxic and genotoxic to sperm whale skin cells
Citation Aquatic Toxicology, 2014; 152: 335-340, Wise, C.F., Wise, J.T.F., Wise, S.S., Thompson, W.D., Wise Jr., J.P., Wise Sr., J.P.. University of Southern Maine
Description In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Rig exploded releasing millions of gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Unprecedented amounts of chemical dispersants were used in the clean-up attempt. This research examines the effects of the dispersants on sperm whale skin cells.
Faculty Dr. John P. Wise is a Professor of Toxicology and Molecular Epidemiology in the Department of Applied Medical Sciences at the University of Southern Maine and is the Director of the Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health.
Student Catherine Wise is starting in a doctoral program in Toxicology at North Carolina State University this fall.
Funding This work was supported by the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens Advisory Council (PWSRCAC) and the Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health [955.12.02]. This paper was developed under GRO Fellowship Assistance Agreement No. [MA-91739301-0] awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It has not been formally reviewed by EPA. The views expressed in this paper are solely those of the authors, and EPA does not endorse any products or commercial services mentioned in this paper.

( 10 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Effect of vitamin D3 on lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.
Citation Current Aging Science., 2013; 6: 3:220-224, Messing JA, Heuberger R, Schisa JA.. Central Michigan University
Description This interdisciplinary study investigated the utility of the model system C. elegans to study the mechanisms of action of vitamin D, an essential micronutrient. A dose response curve indicated that exposure to 1,000 ug/ml results in lifespans extended by up to 39% compared to controls. Analyses using daf-12 mutants suggest that vitamin D3 can interact with multiple receptors, possibly implicating the NHR family of nuclear hormone receptors related to DAF-12. The results support the use of this model system to increase our understanding of Vitamin D function at the cellular level and its effects on longevity.
Faculty Roschelle Heuberger is a Professor in the Human Environmental Studies department, and Jennifer Schisa is a Professor in the Biology Department.
Student Jennifer Messing initiated this research during her sophomore year as a McNair scholar and completed the study as part of her senior honors independent research project. Jennifer is currently at Cornell University working towards her PhD in Nutrition with a concentration in Community Nutrition.
Funding This research was supported by the McNair program at Central Michigan University.

( 11 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title In Vitro Selection Using Modified or Unnatural Nucleotides
Citation 2014; Unit 9.6, Stovall GM, Bedenbaugh RS, Singh S, Meyer AJ, Hatala PJ, Ellington AD, Hall B.. The University of Texas at Austin
Description This work provides protocols and useful considerations for in vitro RNA or DNA selections using modified nucleotides, as well as highlights the significance of modified nucleotides in such selections (such as aptamer, ribozyme, and riboswitch selections).
Faculty Gwendolyn Stovall is a research educator in the Freshman Research Initiative.
Student Robert and Shruti completed this work the summer of their sophomore year through participation in the Freshman Research Initiative. The students are still enrolled as undergraduates at The University of Texas at Austin and are in the process of applying to medical school.
Funding Gwen was primarily supported by the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI) at the University of Texas at Austin and partially supported by both the NSF (Cooperative Agreement No. DBI-0939454) and the NIH (5R03HD068691); undergraduate students (Robert and Shruti) from FRI were partially funded by the NSF (CHE 0629136); additionally, Robert was partially funded by the NIH (5R03HD068691) and Shruti was partially funded by the NSF (Cooperative Agreement No. DBI-0939454); Adam Meyer’s work was supported by the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship (FA9550-10-1-0169) and the Welch Foundation (F-1654).

( 12 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Mechanism of Faster NO Scavenging by Older Stored Red Blood Cells
Citation Redox Biology, 2014; 2: 211-219, Liu C, Liu X, Janes J, Stapley R, Patel RP, Gladwin MT, Kim-Shapiro DB. Wake Forest University
Description Transfusion of older stored blood has been found to lead to more complications than transfusion of fresher stored blood. Loss of red blood cell functionality during storage is known as the storage lesion. We showed that older stored red blood cell scavenge the important signaling molecule Nitric Oxide faster than fresh cells due largely to increased membrane permeability to Nitric Oxide.
Faculty Daniel Kim-Shapiro is a professor of Physics and Harbert Family Distinguished Chair at Wake Forest University
Student John “Jack” Janes is a junior physics major. He worked on this project conducting experiment and computer simulations during the summer of 2013 as a Wake Forest University Undergraduate Research Fellow and has continued to work in the lab.
Funding This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant HL098032 and the URECA center at Wake Forest University

( 13 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Novel neuroprotective function of apical-basal polarity gene crumbs in Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration.
Citation PLoS ONE., 2013; 8: 11:e78717. doi: 10.1371, Andrew M. Steffensmeier, Meghana Tare, Oorvashi Roy Puli, Rohan Modi, Jaison Nainaparampil, Madhuri Kango-Singh and Amit Singh.. University of Dayton
Description Alzheimer's disease (AD, OMIM: 104300), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with no cure to date, is caused by the generation of amyloid-beta-42 (Aβ42) aggregates that trigger neuronal cell death by unknown mechanism(s). We have developed a transgenic Drosophila eye model where misexpression of human Aβ42 results in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) like neuropathology in the neural retina. We have used this model to identify an apical-basal polarity gene crumbs (crb) as a genetic modifier of Aβ42-mediated-neuropathology. Misexpression of Aβ42 caused upregulation of Crb expression, whereas, downregulation of Crb either by RNAi or null allele approach rescued the Aβ42-mediated-neurodegeneration. Thus, Crb can serve as a biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for AD.
Faculty Dr. Amit Singh is an Associate Professor of Cell Biology, Dr. Madhuri Kango-Singh is an Assistant Professor of Genetics at Department of Biology
Student Andrew Steffensmeier is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Dayton (UD). Meghana Tare and Oorvashi Puli are PhD students at UD. Modi and Nainaparampil are medical students that formally worked in the lab at UD. Kango-Singh and Singh (PI) are professors at the UD. Student performed the work for two years and will write an honor’s senior thesis on it.
Funding This work was supported by NIH R15 grant to Amit Singh and University of Dayton Honor's program, University of Dayton Start up to Dr. Amit Singh and Dr. Madhuri Kango-Singh

( 14 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Data-Independent Acquisition (MSE) with Ion Mobility Provides a Systematic Method for Analysis of a Bacteriophage Structural Proteome.
Citation Journal of Virological Methods., 2014; 195: 9-17, Moran D, Cross T, Brown LM, Colligan RM, Dunbar D.. Cabrini College and Columbia Uinversity
Description In this work, a method was developed to study the structural proteome of mycobacteriophage Marvin, a recent isolate from soil with 107 predicted coding sequences. This prototype method was applied for semi-quantitative analysis of the composition of this mycobacteriophage virion using ion mobility spectrometry and data-independent acquisition (MSE-IMS). MSE-IMS was compared to a more conventional proteomics technique employing mass spectrometry with a data-dependent acquisition strategy. MSE-IMS provided broad coverage of the virion proteome and high sequence coverage for individual proteins. This shotgun method does not depend on the limited sensitivity of visualization of protein bands by staining reagents inherent in gel-based methods. The method is comprehensive, provides high sequence coverage and is proposed as a particularly efficient method for the study of bacteriophage proteomes
Faculty David Dunbar is an Associate Professor of Science at Cabrini College.
Student Deborah Moran and Trevor Cross, both Senior Biology majors participated in the project for undergraduate research course credit.
Funding The research was supported by institutional research funds provided to the Biology Department.

( 15 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title THE INFLUENCE OF TWO DIFFERENTLY SIZED DAMS ON MUSSEL ASSEMBLAGES AND GROWTH.
Citation Hydrobiologia., 2014; 724: 1:279-291, Hornbach DJ, Hove MC, Liu H, Schenck FR, Rubin D, Sansom BJ.. Macalester College, St. Paul, MN
Description Dams have been shown to impact freshwater mussels, a threatened group of benthic organisms. This study examined how mussels responded to the presence of two dams, one on the St. Croix River and one on a tributary, the Sunrise River. We quantitatively sampled mussels at locations upstream and downstream of the dams, and for a common species, we ascertained growth rates. The highest mussel richness and diversity were upstream and downstream of the larger dam on the St. Croix while the highest mussel density and growth was found immediately below the smaller dam on the Sunrise. Food availability and temperature variation appeared to influence higher mussel density and growth rate for mussels downstream of the dam on the Sunrise. This study provides information that may help managers when deciding whether to remove small dams or to maintain them because of the unique mussel habitats found below these structures.
Faculty Dan Hornbach is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Environmental Studies and Biology. Mark Hove is a research technician at Macalester and the Univ. of MN.
Student Ho-Ting (Jenny) Liu, Forest Schenck and Diane Rubin conducted research in 2012 and are 2013 Macalester graduates. They were funded through various undergraduate research funds at Macalester. Brendan Sansom conducted research in 2009 and 2010 and is a 2011 graduate of Washington and Jefferson College. He was funded by an HHMI grant. Jenny will be attending graduate school in the fall in landscape architecture. Forest is employed as a research technician in the joint labs of David Kimbro and Randall Hughes at Northeastern University's Marine Science Center. Diane is employed as an AmeriCorps member serving in Ft. Bragg, CA. Brandon is a graduate student in the Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering Department at SUNY University at Buffalo.
Funding Funding was provided by Macalester College, the National Park Service and the National Science Foundation.

( 16 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Patterns of selective caching behavior of a generalist herbivore, the American pika (Ochotona princeps).
Citation Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research., 2013; 45: 3:396-403, Smith JA, Erb LP. University of Colorado at Boulder
Description We conducted the first large-scale study on patterns of selective caching of food resources in the America pika (Ochotona princeps) to determine how selection of particular plant characteristics interacts with environmental variables. Our results indicate that pikas differentially select vegetation for their winter caches with regard to both the external environment and the quality of available vegetation, however, they may select for characteristics of vegetation using different environmental cues. These findings provide insight into how pikas may respond to changing climactic conditions in the southern Rocky Mountains with regard to their foraging behavior. In this initial study of patterns of selective caching behavior across an extensive elevational and latitudinal gradient, we hope to have set the groundwork for further studies of differential foraging decisions at large scales.
Faculty Liesl is a professor of natural and environmental sciences.
Student Justine is currently in a doctoral program for environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
Funding This research was supported by two Undergraduate Research Opportunity grants from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

( 17 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title The Eathworms (Oligochaeta:Lumbricidae and Megascolecidae) of Dutchess County, New Yok, USA
Citation Megadrilogica, 2012; 15: Rodriguez A, Ostfelt R, Keesing F, Reynolds J.. Cary Institute of ecological Studies
Description The present study recorded 14 species of terrestrial Oligochaeta. Eight of these are reported here as new county records: Lumbricidae- Aporrectodea rosea, Dendrobaena octaedra, Dendrodrilus rubidus, Eiseniella tetaedra, Lumbricus costaneus, L. meliboeus Megascolecidae- Amynthas hilgendorfi and Am. hupeiensis. Lumbricus meliboeus is reported here for the fist time in North America.
Faculty Richard Ostfelt is a senior scientist at Cary Institute of Ecological Studies. Felicia Keesing is an proffesor of biology, John Reynolds is an a research associate.
Student Alexandra is currently working as Environmental Interpreter at the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico unit Para la Naturaleza
Funding

( 18 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Continuous in vitro evolution of a ribozyme ligase: a model experiment for the evolution of a biomolecule
Citation Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education., 2013; 41: 6:433-442, Ledbetter MP, Hwang TW, Stovall GM, Ellington AD.. The University of Texas at Austin
Description Evolution is a defining criterion of life and is central to understanding biological systems. However, the timescale of evolutionary shifts in phenotype limits most classroom evolution experiments to simple probability simulations. In vitro directed evolution (IVDE) frequently serves as a model system for the study of Darwinian evolution but produces noticeable phenotypic shifts in a matter of hours. An IVDE demonstration lab would serve to both directly demonstrate how Darwinian selection can act on a pool of variants and introduce students to an essential method of modern molecular biology. Our work served to provide such an experiment through the optimization of a ribozyme ligase-based continuous in vitro evolution system for implementation in the classroom.
Faculty Andrew Ellington is a Professor in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Gwendolyn Stovall is a Research Educator in the Freshman Research Initiative.
Student Michael Ledbetter performed this work over the course of the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years as an independent study project. His work on the project began in the Aptamer Stream of the Freshman Research Initiative at UT Austin and was completed in the Ellington Laboratory. After graduating from UT Austin in May 2013, he began working full time as a technician in the Ellington Laboratory and applying to graduate research programs.
Funding This material was based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. DBI-0939454.

( 19 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Prior hormonal treatment, but not sexual experience, reduces the negative effect of restraint on female sexual behavior
Citation Behavioural Brain Research, 2014; 259: 35-40, Uphouse L, Hiegel C, Adams S, Murillo V, Martinez M. Texas Woman's University
Description The effects of prior sexual experience or prior hormonal priming, without sexual experience, were compared in their ability to reduce the negative effects of restraint on female rat sexual behavior. Prior hormonal treatment reduced the impact of the stressor but prior sexual experience did not.
Faculty Lynda Uphouse is a professor of biology.
Student Sarah Adams is currently in the doctoral program at the University of North Carolina. Sarah contributed to this project in 2011. Vanessa Murillo worked on the project in 2011 and 2012 and is entering medical school. Monique Martinez contributed to the project in 2011 and is currently employed.
Funding The research was supported by NIH HD28419.

( 20 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Human TREX2 components PCID2 and centrin 2, but not ENY2, have distinct functions in protein export and co-localize to the centrosome.
Citation Experimental Cell Research, 2014; 320: 2:209-18, Cunningham CN, Schmidt CA, Schramm NJ, Gaylord MR, Resendes KK.. Westminster College
Description Regulation of nuclear entry and exit via the various mechanisms of nuclear transport is critical for a plethora of cellular functions, including regulated gene expression and cell cycle progression. Alterations of nuclear transport pathways have been linked to various genetic diseases and deregulation of nuclear transport factors can contribute to the progression of cancer. This research characterized the role of the protein PCID2 in the nucleus and beyond. Specifically, our results represented the first discovery of specific novel functions for PCID2 other than its known function in mRNA export and suggested that PCID2 along with another mRNA export factor centrin 2 serve alternative shared roles in the regulation of nuclear protein transport and cell cycle progression.
Faculty Karen Resendes is an assistant professor of Biology
Student Corey Cunningham worked on this project to fulfill his capstone research requirement in biology and continued on the project as an independent study; he is currently a first year graduate student at the University of Michigan. Casey Schmidt and Nathaniel Schramm both contributed work from their honors research projects to publication. Casey is currently a second year graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and Nathaniel is a junior at Westminster working hard to continue the research as part of his honors thesis and is currently applying for summer internship programs to further his research experience before applying to graduate school next year.
Funding The research was support in part by the Westminster College Drinko Center.

( 21 )

Recorded at: 7/9/2014
Title Impact of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) on diatom populations in a Pennsylvania stream.
Citation Microbe Library Digital Gallery., 2013; 12: 2013:Arena, CM, Galebach, JL, Engle, JM, Anderson, MG.. Mount Aloysius College
Description The study was undertaken to collect water quality and diatom samples from one healthy and three abandoned mine drainage affected stream sites. Permanent diatom mounts were created to form slide sets for use in introductory microbiology and water ecology courses. Diatoms were identified, counted, and documented using the SPOT software system. The micrographs were submitted to Microbe Library for use by educators at other institutions to enhance lecture or laboratory. Analysis of differences in diatom populations at the four sites, and seasonal population changes, are ongoing and involves more undergraduate students.
Faculty Mike Engle is an associate professor of Science and Mathematics and Merrilee Anderson is professor of Science and Mathematics and department chair.
Student The two undergraduates, Chris Arena and John Galebach, are both Biology majors who undertook the research during summer 2013 and independent study during regular semesters. Chris is now a junior and John graduated in December 2013 and is pursuing graduate school opportunities.
Funding The research was supported by NSF grant 1226175, Expanding and Refining the Application-Based Service-Learning Pedagogy, with PI Nancy Trun from Duquesne.

( 22 )

Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Genomic characterization of six novel Bacillus pumilus bacteriophages
Citation Virology., 2013; 444: 374-83, Lorenz L, Lins B, Barrett J, Montgomery A, Trapani S, Schindler A, Christie GE, Cresawn SG, Temple L.. James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
Description This is the first genomics report for phages of BAcillus pumilus, which also included data about ~15 phages in addition to the six that were completely sequenced. Many similarities and differences of these phages compared to other sequenced Bacillus phages were explored. The relationship between the phages and a prophage present in the host strain are being addressed.
Faculty Louise Temple is a full professor in the Department of Integrated Science & Technology at JMU. Steve Cresawn is an associate professor in the Department of Biology, JMU. Gail Christie is a full professor, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, VCU School of Medicine, Richmond, VA.
Student The work of the paper was begun in a freshman original resesarch course, Viral Discovery & Genomics, originally sponsored by HHMI and now by JMU. The six undergraduate authors all contributed significantly to the data presented in the paper, which built on the discovery of the phages by the freshmen. The first author, Laura Lorenz, did the bulk of the actual writing of the paper, including extensive work on phylogeny and protein identification. She is currently applying to graduate programs for fall, 2014. Of other other five student authors, two are in graduate programs (Lins, Montgomery), one in medical school (Barrett), one is working in a diagnostic lab (Trapani), and one is a nurse (Schindler).
Funding JMU departments of Integrated Science & Technology and Biology supported the work.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Functional genomic analyses of two morphologically distinct classes of Drosophila sensory neurons: Post-mitotic roles of transcription factors in dendritic patterning.
Citation PLoS ONE., 2013; 8: 8:e72434, Iyer EPR, Iyer SC, Sullivan L, Wang D, Meduri R, Graybeal LL, Cox DN. George Mason University
Description The present study reports the first global gene expression profiles of Drosophila sensory neurons and the first large-scale semi-automated reconstruction of dendritic morphology in these neurons. Comparative transcriptomic analyses shed global and novel insights into the molecular differences that underlie the morphological diversity of distinct neurons subtypes. Moreover, this study documents the functional roles of 37 transcription factors in regulating dendrite development which is a critical process in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of functional neural circuits.
Faculty Daniel N. Cox is an Associate Professor of Systems Biology and a Principal Investigator of the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study.
Student Luis Sullivan, an undergraduate Neuroscience major, conducted this research under the support of the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program (URSP) of the George Mason University Office of Scholarship, Creative Activities and Research (OSCAR). Luis is currently a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA Fellow at NIH and is applying to doctoral programs in Neuroscience.
Funding This research was supported by a grant to Dr. Cox from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Cut via CrebA transcriptionally regulates the COPII secretory pathway to direct dendrite development in Drosophila.
Citation Journal of Cell Science., 2013; 126: 20:4732-4745, Iyer SC, Iyer EPR, Meduri R, Rubaharan M, Kuntimaddi A, Karamsetty M, Cox DN.. George Mason University
Description The present study uncovers functional links between transcriptional regulatory programs and the COPII secretory machinery as a critical mechanism in driving dendrite morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved homeodomain transcription factor, Cut, initiates a transcriptional cascade via CrebA that coordinately modulates COPII pathway activity which thereby mediates class-specific dendritic homeostasis. Moreover, we document for the first-time the presence of satellite ER secretory outposts on dendritic arbors coincident with branch points indicative of a mechanism for potentially regulating dendrite complexity.
Faculty Daniel N. Cox is an Associate Professor of Systems Biology and a Principal Investigator of the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study.
Student Myurajan Rubaharan, an undergraduate Biology major, conducted this research, in part, under the support of the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program (URSP) of the George Mason University Office of Scholarship, Creative Activities and Research (OSCAR). Myurajan is currently a M.S. Biology graduate student in the Cox Laboratory and will be applying this year to M.D./Ph.D. programs.
Funding This research was supported by a grant to Dr. Cox from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Investigation of nasal CO2 receptor mechanisms in wild-type and GC-D knockout mice.
Citation Chemical Senses., 2013; 38: 9:769-781, Kenemuth JK, Hennessy SP, Hanson RJ, Hensler AJ, Coates EL.. Allegheny College
Description This study examined the mechanisms of nasal CO2 detection in mice. In addition to typical odorants, mice and other animals are able to detect CO2 concentrations below that in the expired air. We found that a small subset of olfactory receptors neurons are sensitive to CO2 and that they use unique mechanisms to detect this respiratory gas. This research relates to a larger project investigating the mechanisms and causes of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
Faculty Lee Coates is a Professor of Biology and Neuroscience and the director of Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activities.
Student This work reports results from the students’ summer research and senior projects. Jessica Kenemuth and Allison Hensler are both in dental school at the University of Pennsylvania. Shane Hennessy is in medical school at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and Ryan Hanson is in medical school at Penn State Hershey, College of Medicine.
Funding The research was funded by the Wells Foundation and the Class of 1939 Student Research Fund.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Optimization of a Pain Model: Effects of body temperature and anesthesia on bladder nociception in mice
Citation PLoS One, 2013; 8: 11:e79617, Sadler K, Stratton J, DeBerry J, Kolber B.. Duquesne University
Description The present study examined two experimental variables, temperature and anesthesia, that impact the interpretation and use of a common mouse model of bladder pain. A significant effect of time under anesthesia was found where animals that were tested for pain-like responses after only a brief period of anesthesia had progressively smaller responses after 1 hour of anesthesia. In contrast, mice that were exposed to lower and lower values of anesthesia for 1.5 hours before testing exhibited stable and repeatable pain-like effects for up to 4 hours of testing. In addition, a significant decrease in pain-like effects was seen when body temperature of the animal was not kept within 1 degree (Celsius) of the normal body temperature of mice.
Faculty Faculty member Benedict J. Kolber is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and research and education coordinator for the Chronic Pain Research Consortium at Duquesne University.
Student Senior undergraduate student Jarred Stratton was a co-author on this study. Jarred participated in these studies from Summer 2012 through Summer 2013. Jarred is currently applying for graduate schools in Neuroscience.
Funding Jarred participated in these studies from summer 2012 through Summer 2013. His participation was funded through the American Physiological Society Undergraduate Summer Research Program (JS 2012), Duquesne University Undergraduate Research Program (JS 2013), and the International Association for the Study of Pain (BK 2013).

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Glycerophosphocholine Utilization by Candida albicans: Role of the Git3 transporter in virulence
Citation Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2013; 288: 47:33939-52, Bishop AC, Ganguly S, Solis NV, Cooley BM, Jensen-Seaman MI, Filler SG, Mitchell AP, Patton-Vogt J.. Duquesne University, Carnegie Mellon University, UCLA
Description Candida albicans is a pathogenic fungus and the cause of many hospital-acquired infections. This study identified and characterized novel transport proteins responsible for the uptake of the lipid metabolite, glycerophosphocholine by C. albicans. Importantly, this work identified the Git3 transporter as being required for the full virulence of the organism in a mouse model of infection.
Faculty Jana Patton-Vogt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Duquesne University
Student The undergraduate involved in these studies, Ben Cooley, separated and quantified glycerophosphocholine and related metabolites in the cell. Ben Cooley was a senior when the experiments were performed and is currently is a Masters student in the Forensic Science Program at Duquesne.
Funding The research at Duquesne University was supported by an NIHR15 grant.

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Recorded at: 4/3/2014
Title Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement
Citation Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2013; 97: 16:7405-16, Ding J, Bierma J, Smith MR, Poliner E, Wolfe C, Hadduck AN, Zara S, Jirikovic M, van Zee K, Penner MH, Patton-Vogt J, Bakalinsky AT.. Duquesne University and Oregon State University
Description A number of industrial processes, including biofuel production, utilize yeast fermentation. Yeast fermentation is inhibited, however, by acetic acid, which is both produced by the yeast and can result from the chemical preparation of the plant cell wall material to be used as a source of sugar for fermentation. A major goal of this project is to understand the mechanisms for the growth inhibitory properties of acetic acid.
Faculty Jana Patton-Vogt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Duquesne University.
Student The two undergraduates involved in this study, Carole Wolfe and Eric Poliner, contributed to the work by performing nutrient transport experiments in the presence and absence of high concentrations of acetic acid. Their results indicate that the transport of many compounds is inhibited by acetic acid. These results provide important information regarding the optimal strains to be used for fermentation processes. Both Carole Wolfe and Eric Poliner were seniors at Duquesne University when they conducted research on this project. Both students participated in research for credit. Eric Poliner is currently in graduate school and Carole Wolfe is employed and in the process of applying to graduate schools.
Funding The research was funded through a USDA grant for which A. Bakalinsky was the principal investigator and J. Patton-Vogt was a subcontract awardee. Carole Wolfe received an award from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) to support her work one summer.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Integrating quantitative skills in introductory ecology: Investigations of wild bird feeding preferences
Citation The American Biology Teacher (Special Emphasis Issue: Mathematical Application in Learning Biology)., 2013; 75: 269-273, Small CJ, Newtoff, K.. Radford University
Description Undergraduate science education is undergoing dramatic changes, emphasizing student training in the “tools and practices” of science, particularly quantitative and problem-solving skills. We redesigned a freshman ecology lab sequence to emphasize the importance of scientific inquiry and quantitative reasoning in biology. This multi-week research used observations of avian form and function and an extensive student-generated data set (>7,000 observations) to introduce hypothesis testing, experimental design, and biological statistics. Research groups compared feeding location and seed preferences between wild bird species, evaluating their findings quantitatively using descriptive statistics, graphing, and data analysis, and ecologically through comparisons of species biology and natural history.
Faculty Christine Small is an associate professor of biology.
Student Kiersten Newtoff collaborated on this work for her Honor's Capstone project at Radford University. She graduated with a B.S. in Biology 2012 and is currently in a master's program in marine biology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington.
Funding This research was supported by a NSF TUES grant to RU Biology and a RU Biology Undergraduate Research Grant to Kiersten Newtoff.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Differential effects of electrical stimulation of the central amygdala and lateral hypothalamus on Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the gustatory brainstem and taste reactivity behaviors in conscious rats
Citation Chemical Senses., 2013; 10: 1093:chemse/bjt039, Riley CA, King, MS.. Stetson University
Description Forebrain regions, including the central amygdala (CeA) and lateral hypothalamus (LH), project to brain stem areas that control taste-related behaviors. This study evaluated the effects of electrically stimulating the CeA and LH in conscious rats on taste reactivity behaviors. The main findings were that stimulation of either of these areas without intra-oral infusion of a taste solution increased the number of ingestive (mouth movements and tongue protrusions), but not aversive (primarily gapes), TR behaviors. During infusion of taste solutions, CeA stimulation tended to increase aversive behavioral responses whereas LH stimulation tended to reduce aversive behaviors. So, the pathways from the CeA and LH can cause taste reactivity behaviors and seem to play different roles in behavioral responses to taste input.
Faculty Michael King is a professor of biology.
Student Christopher Riley began this work as a summer research project and continued it as his senior project and after he graduated from Stetson University in May, 2012. He is currently a medical student at Virginia Commonwealth University.
Funding This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 DC007854], the National Science Foundation [RUI IOS-1145132], and Stetson University [SURE grant].

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Factors Regulating Net Methane Flux by Soils in Urban Forests and Grasslands.
Citation Soil Science Society of America Journal., 2013; 77: 850-855, Costa, K.H. and P.M. Groffman.. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Description This study followed up on studies in the Baltimore USA metropolitan area that found that conversion of forests to lawns eliminated the ability of soils to take up CH4, a potent greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. This REU student investigated three factors that could be causing this inhibition; reduced diffusion of CH4 into soils, production of CH4 in anaerobic microsites, and N additions from fertilizer or atmospheric deposition. Results suggested that differences in N cycling associated with urban land use change may have led to a reduction in the microbial populations responsible for methane uptake. The work increased our basic science understanding of an important microbial process and was relevant to environmental issues associated with land use and climate change.
Faculty Dr. Peter M. Groffman a Microbial Ecologist and Senior Scientist at Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.
Student Karina was an REU student (funded by the NSF) at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in the summer of 2009. She is currently pursuing her Masters degree in soil science at the University of Tennessee, with an expected graduation date of 2014.
Funding This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) (DEB–0423476) and Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) (DEB-244101) programs.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title ZnS nanocrystal cytotoxicity is influenced by capping agent chemical structure and duration of time in suspension
Citation Journal of Applied Toxicology., 2013; 33: 227-237, Weilnau JN, Black SE, Chehata VJ, Schmidt MP, Holt KL, Carl LM, Straka CJ, Marsh AL, Patton WA, Lappas CM.. Lebanon Valley College
Description In this study, zinc sulfide (ZnS) semiconductor nanocrystals were synthesized in the 3 to 4 nm size range with selected capping agents intended to protect the nanocrystal core and increase its biological compatibility. We show that the biocompatibility of zinc sulfide nanocrystals with primary murine splenocytes is influenced by the chemical structure of the outer capping agent on the nanocrystal. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of ZnS nanocrystals increases markedly as a function of time spent in suspension in phosphate buffered saline. These data suggest that the potential therapeutic and/or biological use of ZnS nanocrystals is inherently dependent upon the proper choice of capping agent, as well as the conditions of nanocrystal preparation and storage.
Faculty Courtney M. Lappas is an assistant professor of biology
Student This study was completed by student researchers working on the project from 2010-2013. Students undertook the work as independent study projects and/or summer research projects. Justin Weilnau is currently applying to Ph.D. programs; Sarah Black is still enrolled at LVC and is in the process of applying to MD programs; Veronica Chehata is enrolled in medical school; Michael Schmidt is enrolled in a Ph.D. program, Kimberly Holt is employed as a teacher; Lindsay Carl is enrolled in a Ph.D. program and Collin Straka is still enrolled at LVC and is currently applying to Ph.D. programs.
Funding This research was supported in part by a Merck-AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Grant

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Silicone-acyclovir controlled release devices suppress primary herpes simplex virus-2 and varicella zoster virus infections in vitro
Citation Advances in Pharmacological Sciences, 2013; 2013: 915159, Berkower CL, Johnson NM, Longdo SB, McGusty-Robinson SO, Semenkow SL, Margulies BJ.. Towson University
Description We have developed controlled-release, silicone-based acyclovir delivery vehicles that can suppress herpes virus reactivations for the long term (up to years). This research showed that these newly engineered materials can prevent primary infection of herpes simplex virus-2 and varicella virus, the causative agents of genital herpes and chicken pox. Furthermore, we showed that the amount of drug released is constant, near zero-order, and maintained those characteristics for at least 60 days. Development of a slow-release implant has the potential to significantly impact the treatment of human alpha herpesvirus infections.
Faculty Barry Margulies is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Student Nicole Johnson, a two-year researcher in the Towson University Herpes Virus Lab (TUHVL), graduated in 2012 and is currently a farrier. Shenika McGusty-Robinson also conducted research for two years, presented parts of these experiments at an ABRCMS and ASV meeting, and graduated in 2009; she is currently an administrator at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Samantha Semenkow was in the TUHVL for two years and also presented parts of this work at an ASV meeting; she graduated in 2010 and is currently a PhD student in the Pathobiology program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Funding TU Faculty Development Research Committee, Graduate Student Association, Undergraduate Research Committee, Towson's FCSM Undergraduate Research Committee; ASM Summer Undergraduate Research fellowships for SLS and SOM-R; NIH NIAID R15AI084069.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The Escherichia coli CydX Protein Is a Member of the CydAB Cytochrome bd Oxidase Complex and Is Required for Cytochrome bd Oxidase Activity
Citation Journal of Bacteriology., 2013; 195: 16:3640-3650, VanOrsdel CE, Bhatt S, Allen RJ, Brenner EP, Hobson JJ, Jamil A, Haynes BM, Genson AM, Hemm MR.. Towson University and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Description Small proteins, defined as those of 50 or fewer amino acids, are difficult to identify and characterize using standard techniques. Thus, little is known about their prevalence and function. The current study presents evidence that in the bacterium Escherichia coli, the small protein CydX is a newly-identified subunit of the CydAB cytochrome oxidase complex, and is required for this complex to act in cellular respiration. This is a surprising result given that the CydAB complex is well-characterized, and has been studied for more than 70 years.
Faculty Matthew Hemm is an assistant professor in biological sciences at Towson University and is a Jess and Mildred Fisher Endowed Chair of Biological Sciences.
Student Rondine Allen, Evan Brenner, Jessica Hobson, and Caitlin VanOrsdel conducted the research as seniors for independent research credit. Allyson Genson, Brittany Haynes and Aqsa Jamil conducted their research as juniors. Rondine Allen and Caitlin VanOrsdel also conducted research post-graduation as research assistants working in the lab. Rondine Allen, Brittany Haynes, and Jessica Hobson are currently attending graduate school (Allen: Iowa State University, Haynes: Wayne State University, Hobson: Towson University). Caitlin VanOrsdel and Evan Brenner are currently working as research assistants at Towson University. Aqsa Jamil and Allyson Genson are continuing to conduct research at Towson for independent research credit.
Funding Research was supported by undergraduate research grants awarded to Brittany Haynes and Caitlin VanOrsdel and by an NIAID R15 grant awarded to Matthew Hemm.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The depth of the honeybee’s backup sun-compass systems
Citation Journal of Experimental Biology, 2013; 216: 2129-2139, Dovey KM, Kemfort JR and Towne WF.. Kutztown University of PA
Description Honeybees can orient by the sun even under overcast skies using a memory of the sun’s course in relation to the landscape. This study asked whether bees have any further backup sun-orientation systems, that is, whether bees can locate the sun under overcast skies in unfamiliar landscapes. They could not, indicating that we know the full depth of the bees’ orientation systems.
Faculty William Towne is a professor of biology at Kutztown University.
Student Katelyn and Jordan worked on the project for independent study credit during the summers of 2009 and 2012, respectively. Katelyn is currently a high-school biology teacher in Dauphin County, PA, and Jordan will be starting a master’s program in biology at Bucknell University in January, 2014.
Funding The research was supported by grants to Dr. Towne from the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Faculty Professional Development Council and the Kutztown University Research Committee.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Wyoming big sagebrush screens ultraviolet radiation more effectively at higher elevations
Citation Journal of Arid Environments, 2013; 96: 19-22, Ruhland CT, Dyslin MJ, Krenz JD. Minnesota State University, Mankato
Description The flux of biologically-effective ultraviolet radiation is diminished by atmospheric absorption which may cause physiological and phenotypic differences among plant populations at different elevations. We examined UV-screening effectiveness of Wyoming Big Sagebrush along an 800-m elevation gradient. Epidermal transmittance was measured with a UVA pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometer and decreased with altitude. In order to provide a proximate explanation for this relationship we examined concentrations of UV-absorbing phenolics which increased with elevation. Because the distance along the elevation gradient was only 18 km, gene flow likely prevents ecotypic differentiation; the ultimate cause of the ecocline in screening effectiveness is likely the evolution of environmentally-induced phenotypic plasticity in both biochemical and anatomical properties of leaves in response to variation in UV irradiance.
Faculty Christopher T. Ruhland and John D. Krenz are Professors of Biology at Minnesota State University, Mankato.
Student Michael J. Dyslin undertook this research during the summer of 2011 as an Undergraduate Research Project and presented his findings at local, regional and national meetings. He is currently employed and considering graduate programs in Environmental Science.
Funding Partial support was provided from the United States Department of Energy (Grant #DE-FG36-08GO88156) and the National Science Foundation (Grants #DEB1256129 and #DEB1256180).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Uncertainty in Population Estimates for Endangered Animals and Improving the Recovery Process
Citation Animals., 2013; 3: 3:745-753, Haines AM, Zak M, Hammond K, Scott JM, Goble DD, Rachlow JL.. Millersville University
Description Our study evaluated the mention of uncertainty (i.e., variance) associated with population size estimates in U.S. recovery plans for endangered animals. We found that more recent recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty. Also, bird and mammal recovery plans reported more estimates of population size and uncertainty. We recommend that updated recovery plans combine uncertainty of population size estimates with a minimum detectable difference to aid in successful recovery of endangered animals.
Faculty Aaron Haines is an assistant professor with the Applied Conservation Lab in the Biology Department at Millersville University.
Student Matthew Zak started his research in the Fall of 2012 as an Independent Study Project. Matthew graduated in May 2013 with a degree in Environmental Biology at Millersville University. Matthew is currently volunteering at the featherbend bird banding station in Hopewell New Jersey,.
Funding Research was supported by the Keever Biology Research Training Fund at Millersville University.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Functional genomic analyses of two morphologically distinct classes of Drosophila sensory neurons: Post-mitotic roles of transcription factors in dendritic patterning.
Citation PLoS ONE, 2013; 8: 8:e72434. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072434, Iyer EPR, Iyer SC, Sullivan L, Wang D, Meduri R, Graybeal LL, Cox DN.. George Mason University
Description The present study reports the first global gene expression profiles of Drosophila sensory neurons and the first large-scale semi-automated reconstruction of dendritic morphology in these neurons. Comparative transcriptomic analyses shed global and novel insights into the molecular differences that underlie the morphological diversity of distinct neurons subtypes. Moreover, this study documents the functional roles of 37 transcription factors in regulating dendrite development which is a critical process in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of functional neural circuits.
Faculty Daniel N. Cox is an Associate Professor of Systems Biology and a Principal Investigator of the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study.
Student Luis Sullivan, an undergraduate Neuroscience major, conducted this research under the support of the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program (URSP) of the George Mason University Office of Scholarship, Creative Activities and Research (OSCAR). Luis is currently a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA Fellow at NIH and is applying to doctoral programs in Neuroscience.
Funding This research was supported by grants to Dr. Cox from the NIH/NIMH (MH086928-02) and the Thomas F. and Kate Miller Jeffress Memorial Trust.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Diet complexity and estrogen receptor beta-status affect the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota.
Citation Applied and Environmental Microbiology., 2013; 79: 18:5763-5773, Menon R, Watson SE, Thomas LN, Allred CD, Dabney A, Azcarate-Peril MA, Sturino JM.. Texas A&M University
Description Intestinal microbial dysbiosis contributes to the dysmetabolism of luminal factors, including steroid hormones that affect the development of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation and the incidence of sterone-responsive cancers of the breast, prostate, and colon. In this study, conventionally-raised female ERâ+/+ and ERâ−/− C57BL/6J mice were used to test the hypothesis that ERâ status affects microbiota composition and determine if such compositionally-distinct microbiota respond differently to changes in diet complexity (8604 versus AIN-76). The results of these experiments suggest that sterone nucleoreceptor status and diet complexity may play important roles in microbiota maintenance.
Faculty Dr. Joseph Sturino is an assistant professor of microbiology.
Student Sara Watson participated in this research for independent study credit as a senior undergraduate student majoring in nutrition (2010-2011). Sara was awarded a Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Senior Merit Award and Graduated Summa Cum Laude. Sara is currently attending medical school.
Funding NIH/NCI Biostatistics Training Program Grant CA090301-11, NIH P30 DK34987, American Institute for Cancer Research grant 07B080, and Texas A&M AgriLife Research provided funding for this research.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Combined biological and chemical pretreatment method for lignocellulosic ethanol production from energy cane
Citation Renewable Bioresources, 2013; 1: 1:1-6, Suhardi VS, Prasai B, Samaha D, Boopathy, R.. Nicholls State University
Description The process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol involves pretreatment to disrupt the complex of lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, freeing cellulose and hemicellulse for enzymatic saccharification and fermentation. Determining optimal pretreatment techniques for fermentation is essential for the success of lignocellulosic energy production process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate energy cane for lignocellulosic ethanol production. Various pretreatments were evaluated. Combination of fungal pretreatment with dilute acid hydrolysis reduced the acid requirement from 3% to 1% and this combined process could be more economical in a large-scale production system.
Faculty Dr. Ramaraj (Raj) Boopathy, Alcee Fortier Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Biological Sciences
Student David Samaha and Bijeta Prasai were undergraduate students at Nicholls. The work was performed in the Academic Year 2011-2012. Both students worked as student workers in a research grant. David Samaha is attending Medical School in LSU Medical Center in New Orleans. Bijeta Prasai is pursuing Ph.D in LSU, Baton Rouge.
Funding This research was funded through a grant from the Department of Energy.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Polychlorinated biphenyls disrupt cell division and tip growth in two species of fucoid algae
Citation Journal of Phycology., 2013; 49: 701-708, Hable WE, Nguyen X.. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Description This study examined the effects of PCB contaminants on the embryonic development of two species of marine algae, intertidal organisms that are routinely exposed to environmental contaminants. A mixture of the most abundant PCB congeners, Aroclors 1221, 1242, and 1254, severely delayed cell division and growth, and ultimately killed most embryos, suggesting that PCBs still present in coastal sediments could be inhibiting recruitment in these species.
Faculty Whitney Hable is an associate professor of biology.
Student Xuan Nguyen was an undergraduate who contributed to the research from 2007-2009, initially as a volunteer, for research credit, and later as a paid assistant. Xuan is currently a student at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Worcester.
Funding This research was supported by a Chancellor’s Healey Endowment Award (Hable 2008).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Modeling below-ground biomass to improve sustainable management of Actaea racemosa, a globally important medicinal forest product
Citation Forest Ecology and Management, 2013; 293: 1-8, Chamberlain JL, Ness G, Small CJ, Bonner SJ, Hiebert EB.. Radford University and USDA Forest Service
Description Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) rhizomes are harvested extensively from Appalachian forests for medicinal use. Data from long-term experimental harvest studies of black cohosh were used to develop a predictive model of below-ground biomass based on above-ground measures. Plant height, leaf canopy, and rhizome biomass data were collected from > 1,100 central Appalachian black cohosh plants and used in model development. We evaluated the effectiveness of our model in predicting rhizome biomass using 550 plants from neighboring sites. Similar relationships for model-development and validation study sites support the effectiveness of our model. This model will serve as a valuable tool for inventorying forest resources and aid in the development of sustainable management strategies for this and other wild-harvested medicinal plants.
Faculty James Chamberlain is a forest products research scientist. Christine Small is an associate professor of biology. Simon Bonner is an assistant professor of statistics.
Student Gabrielle worked on this project as an undergraduate research student at Radford University from 2009-2011. She continued this research through an internship with the USDA Forest Service in 2012. She is currently a master's student in statistics at the University of Kentucky.
Funding This research was funded by grants to Radford University from the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station and by internship funding to Gabrielle Ness from the USDA Forest Service.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats
Citation Behavioural Brain Research., 2012; 235: 73-81, Adams S, Heckard D, Hassell J, Uphouse L.. Texas Woman's University
Description The effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, on multiple measures of female rat sexual behavior (sexual receptivity, proceptivity, sexual motivation) was examined. Fluoxetine (15 mg/kg) inhibited sexual receptivity of hormonally primed ovariectomized rats. Pretesting for sexual behavior amplified the effects of the antidepressant on sexual receptivity. Measures of sexual motivation (active investigation of a male during partner preference testing or time with the male in the paced mating paradigm) were also significantly reduced by fluoxetine. In human females, fluoxetine produces sexual dysfunction in 50-80% of patients. The current studies formulate a starting point toward investigation of the mechanisms responsible for this sexual dysfunction.
Faculty Lynda Uphouse is professor of biology.
Student Sarah Adams is currently in a doctoral program in the Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Danyeal Heckard is in a doctoral program in Biomedical Sciences at Meharry Medical College. James Hassell is in a doctoral program in the Department of Biology at the University of South Dakota.
Funding The research was supported by NIH HD28419 and the TWU Research Enhancement Program funding awarded to Dr. Uphouse.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title RU486 blocks effects of allopregnanolone on the response to restraint stress
Citation Pharmacology Biochemistry & Behavior, 2013; 103: 568-572, Uphouse L, Adams S, Miryala, CSJ, Hassell J, Hiegel C.. Texas Woman's University
Description Ovariectomized Fischer female rats were hormonally primed with10 µg estradiol benzoate and 4 mg/kg of the progesterone metabolite, allopregnanolone. One hr before allopregnanolone was injected, females were injected with the progesterone receptor antagonist, RU486. The experiment was designed to determine if allopregnanolone’s ability to reduce the effects of mild stress on female sexual receptivity involved the classical progesterone receptor. In the absence of allopregnanolone, females primed with estradiol benzoate showed a rapid decline in sexual receptivity after restraint. Allopregnanolone reduced this decline and RU486 attenuated allopregnanolone’s effect. Since allopregnanolone does not directly bind to the classical progesterone receptor, the current studies are evidence of a potential indirect activation of the receptor by the progestrone metabolite.
Faculty Lynda Uphouse is Professor of Biology.
Student Sarah Adams and James Hassell were undergraduate research assistants in the lab of Dr. Uphouse. Sarah Admas is in a doctoral program in the Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.James Hassell is a doctoral student in the Department of Biology at the University of South Dakota. Chandra Miryala is a doctoral student in molecular biology and Cindy Hiegel is a research assistant in the Department of Biology, both at Texas Woman's University.
Funding The research was supported by NIH HD28419 and the TWU Research Enhancement Program.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Development of a carbohydrate-supplemented semidefined medium for the semiselective cultivation of Lactobacillus spp.
Citation Letters in Applied Microbiology., 2013; 56: Menon R, Shields M, Duong T, Sturino JM.. Texas A&M University
Description Lactobacilli are beneficial microorganisms that are incorporated into probiotic supplements and used to ferment and preserve foods. The objective of this study was to develop a new medium to support the semiselective cultivation of a wide variety of Lactobacillus species. The resultant medium, MS, not only supported the proliferation of lactobacilli at levels comparable to the current gold-standard medium (MRS), but it also exhibited greater semiselectivity against unrelated species.
Faculty Dr. Joseph Sturino is an assistant professor of microbiology.
Student Meredith Shields, a senior undergraduate student majoring in nutrition, participated in this research for independent study credit (2012-2013). As a result of her accomplishments, Meredith was awarded a competitive Undergraduate Research Scholarship from the Texas A&M University Nutrition and Food Science Department. Meredith is currently applying to occupational therapy programs.
Funding USDA Hatch Project TEX 09436 provided funding for this research.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Specific Ligand Binding Domain Residues Confer Low Dioxin Responsiveness to AHR1â of Xenopus laevis.
Citation Biochemistry., 2013; 52: 1746-1754, Odio C, Holzman SA, Denison MS, Fraccalvieri D, Bonati L, Franks DG, Hahn ME, Powell WH.. Kenyon College
Description Toxicity of dioxin-like chemicals is mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Frogs are remarkably insensitive to the toxicity of dioxin-like chemicals, and frog AHRs bind dioxins with low affinity. In this study, we constructed a homology model suggesting that low affinity dioxin binding was due to two variant amino acids in the putative ligand binding cavity. Binding and activity assays with mutated AHRs confirmed the suppositions of the model.
Faculty Wade Powell is a professor of biology.
Student Cami Odio and Sarah Holzman performed much of the work as their senior thesis projects. Cami is a medical student at the Cleveland Clinic. Sarah was a post-bac IRTA at NIH before moving on to medical school at Emory.
Funding NIH AREA Grant: R15 ES011130Cami received a Pfizer Undergraduate Travel Award to present portions of this work at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Phototaxis, host cues, and host-plant finding in a monophagous weevil, Rhinoncomimus latipes
Citation Journal of Insect Behavior., 2013; 26: Smith JR, Hough-Goldstein J.. University of Delaware
Description Rhinoncomimus latipes is a weevil imported from China as a biological control agent for an invasive vine, mile-a-minute weed, in the eastern United States. In this study, a series of greenhouse tests showed that R. latipes is positively phototactic, responsive to host cues, and preferentially attracted to sun-grown plants over shade-grown plants. The experiments help explain the process of dispersal and host-plant finding in this extremely host-specific insect.
Faculty Judith Hough-Goldstein is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology.
Student Jeffrey Smith conducted the study in the summer of 2011, as a UD Summer Scholar. Jeffrey is currently enrolled in the Master of Environmental Science program at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.
Funding The research was supported by the UD Undergraduate Research Program and with funding from the USDA Forest Service.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title A web-based multi-genome synteny viewer for customized data
Citation BMC Bioinformatics., 2012; 13: Revanna KV, Munro D, Gao A, Chiu CC, Pathak A, Dong Q.. University of North Texas
Description Web-based synteny visualization tools are important for sharing data and revealing patterns of complicated genome conservation and rearrangements. We have developed multi-Genome Synteny Viewer (mGSV), a web-based tool that allows users to upload their own genomic data files for visualization. Multiple genomes can be presented in a single integrated view using either pairwise or multiple viewing mode to examine conserved genomic regions as well as the accompanying genome annotations. A web server hosting mGSV is provided at http://cas-bioinfo.cas.unt.edu/mgsv.
Faculty Qunfeng Dong is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
Student Daniel, a biology senior during this research, has graduated and will be attending graduate school at Princeton University in the fall. Alvin, a high school senior during this research, has graduated from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, and will attend Yale University in the fall as an undergraduate. Chi-Chen, a CSE senior during this research, has graduated and is currently employed at BEC Technologies, Inc. Anil, a CSE senior during this research, is currently completing his undergraduate studies.
Funding This work was supported by an NIH grant, a UNT grant awarded to Qunfeng Dong, a grant from HHMI awarded to Daniel, and a TAMS research fellowship awarded to Alvin.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Investigation of the Effect of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Subgingival Plaque Microbiota by High-Throughput 16S rDNA Pyrosequencing
Citation PLOS ONE., 2013; 8: 4:Zhou M, Rong R, Munro D, Zhu C, Gao X, Zhang Q, Dong Q.. University of North Texas
Description We investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes on the subgingival plaque bacterial composition by applying culture-independent 16S rDNA sequencing to periodontal bacteria isolated from four groups of volunteers: non-diabetic subjects without periodontitis, non-diabetic subjects with periodontitis, type 2 diabetic patients without periodontitis, and type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis. Significant differences in certain bacterial abundances between diabetics and non-diabetics were observed in patients with healthy periodontium and in patients with periodontitis. Our results show that type 2 diabetes mellitus could alter the bacterial composition in the subgingival plaque.
Faculty Qunfeng Dong is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.
Student Daniel, a senior during this research, has graduated and will be attending graduate school at Princeton University in the fall.
Funding Funding for this study included the Research Initiation Grant at UNT, and a grant to UNT from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

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Title Impaired contractile responses and altered expression and phosphorylation of Ca2+ sensitization proteins in gastric antrum smooth muscles from ob/ob mice.
Citation The Journal of Muscle Research & Cell Motility., 2013; 34: 2:137-149, Bhetwal BP, An C, Baker SA, Lyon KL, Perrino BA.. University of Nevada School of Medicine
Description Diabetic gastroparesis is a common complication of diabetes, with symptoms of abdominal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. The ob/ob mouse model of obesity and diabetes develops delayed gastric emptying, providing an animal model for investigating the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis. We hypothesized that reduced expression and phosphorylation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitory proteins MYPT1 and CPI-17 could contribute to impaired antrum smooth muscle function of diabetic gastroparesis. Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2) expression was decreased. MYPT1 and myosin light chain 20 phosphorylation was reduced compared to age-matched controls. These findings suggest that reduced MLCP inhibition due to decreased ROCK2 phosphorylation of MYPT1 in gastric antrum smooth muscles contributes to the antral dysmotility of diabetic gastroparesis.
Faculty Brian Perrino is an associate professor of physiology & cell biology
Student Kristin Lyon undertook the work during the 2102-2013 academic year for her senior honor's thesis in biochemistry. She is currently applying to medical school
Funding The work was supported by NIH/NIGMS grant number GM103513

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Title Holding on to a shifting substrate: plasticity of egg mass tethers and tethering forces in soft sediment for an intertidal gastropod
Citation Biological Bulletin., 2012; 223: 300-311, Castro DA, Podolsky RD.. College of Charleston
Description Many marine organisms must stay attached at favorable sites in the face of considerable hydrodynamic forces. Although several mechanisms are known for attaching to hard substrate, our study was the first to examine the unique challenges of staying in place on soft sediment. We used surveys of field sites that varied in water flow and laboratory experiments in which we manipulated flow to understand how intertidal snails use flexible tethers to attach their egg masses to the surfaces of tidal flats. Our results show that adults can plastically adjust the properties of egg mass tethers in response to variation in the risks of losing offspring to dislodgment by the forces of water motion.
Faculty Robert Podolsky is an associate professor of biology.
Student Diego Castro graduated with a degree in Biology and participated in this research as an REU student in 2010 at the Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington. Diego is employed and in the process of applying to graduate programs.
Funding The work was supported by a National Science Foundation REU grant DBI-1004193 to the Friday Harbor Laboratories and National Science Foundation award OCE-0621467 to Robert Podolsky.

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Title The impact of garlic mustard on sandy forest soils
Citation Applied Soil Ecology., 2012; 60: 23-28, Morris SJ, Herrmann DL, McClain J, Anderson J, McConnaughay KD.. Bradley University
Description Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), an exotic biennial herb invasive to North American forests, produces a suite of toxic chemicals that impact diversity both above and belowground and thus likely alter ecosystem processes. To examine the effects of garlic mustard on soil biota and ecosystem processes, we sampled soil from invaded and uninvaded stands at a pine plantation on sandy soils in central Illinois. We found that pine soils underlying garlic mustard have higher pH, and higher rates of N mineralization, relative nitrification and soil respiration compared to soils without garlic mustard. The increased ecosystem N turnover will likely have long term effects on soil nutrient status, with potential to feedback to forest health.
Faculty Sherri Morris and Kelly McConnaughay are professors of biology.
Student Dustin Hermann, a sophomore student at Illinois Central College, and Jessica McClain, a junior at Bennett College, were participants in our Research Experiences for Undergraduates summer research program. Dustin returned to Bradley as a post-baccalaureate student to continue this work after graduating from Illinois State University. He is currently a graduate student at University of California at Davis. Jacklyn Anderson was a graduate student in the biology program at Bradley.
Funding The research was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation awarded to Drs. Morris and McConnaughay.

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Title Dietary esterified astaxanthin effects on color, carotenoid concentrations, and compositions of clown anemonefish, Amphiprion ocellaris, skin
Citation Aquaculture International, 2013; 21: 2:361-374, Ho ALFC, O’Shea SK, Pomeroy HF.. Roger Williams University
Description There are over 1,800 fish species traded on the marine ornamental market, however, only 25 (1.4 %) of these species are known to be cultured commercially. To enhance the marketability of the most popular marine ornamental fish Amphiprion ocellaris a carotenoid dietary study was undertaken. This study examined the effects of a supplemented esterified astaxanthin commercial diets on skin coloration. As well as determining the carotenoid composition and their accumulation rates in the skin at various fish ages a proposed metabolic oxidative pathway was predicted.
Faculty Stephen K. O’Shea,associate professor of Chemistry Harold F. Pomeroy,professor of Biology
Student This study was conducted by Adeljean L. F. C. Ho as part of his undergraduate senior Honors thesis his summer research sponsored by an RWU CEED grant. He is presently pursing his PhD. degree at Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL, USA.
Funding The research was funded by an undergraduate research grant from RWU Center for Economic and Environmental Development (CEED).

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Title Improved tolerance to salt and water stress in Drosophila melanogaster cells conferred by late embryogenesis abundant protein.
Citation Journal of Insect Physiology., 2013; 59: 377-386, Marunde MA, Samarajeewa DA, Anderson JA, Li S, Hand SC, Menze MA. Eastern Illinois University
Description Some animals in nature possess a mechanism to survive severe water loss through the expression of highly hydrophilic proteins. These proteins are named LEA proteins and are thought to interact with membranes and proteins in order to protect and maintain cellular functions during drying and rehydration. Cells from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster cells were genetically engineered to express a specific mitochondrial targeted LEA protein from the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana (AfLEA1.3). Expression of AfLEA1.3 significantly reduced the negative effects of freezing and osmotic stress on fly cells and mitochondria. Our study demonstrates that AfLEA1.3 exerts a protective influence on mitochondrial functions and increased the viability of D. melanogaster cells in several water stress models.
Faculty Dr. Michael Menze is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Eastern Illinois University.
Student Matthew Marunde is an undergraduate student at Eastern Illinois University majoring in Biology with a minor in chemistry. He conducted most of his research in 2011 and 2012, especially in the summers of 2011 and 2012. Matthew’s future goal is continue his education at medical school.
Funding Eastern Illinois University Honors College URSCA grants, Eastern Illinois University Council on Faculty Research grants, National Science Foundation IOS-0920254.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterases RmdA and RmdB are involved in regulating colony morphology and development in Streptomyces coelicolor
Citation Journal of Bacteriology., 2012; 194: 17:4642-4651, Hull TD, Ryu M, Sullivan MJ, Klena NT, Johnson RC, Geiger RM, Gomelsky M, Bennett JA.. Juniata College, Otterbein University, University of Wyoming
Description Cyclic di-GMP signaling is widespread among bacteria and controls a variety of processes, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression and virulence. In this study, two novel genes in the Gram-positive, filamentous soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor, were characterized and found to encode active phosphodiesterases involved in the regulation of morphology and development, including antibiotic production, via cyclic di-GMP signaling. This is significant because Streptomyces species produce over two-thirds of commercially important antibiotics. Furthermore, cyclic di-GMP signaling has been studied widely in Gram-negative bacteria, but this represents one of a small number of studies where relevant proteins have been investigated in Gram-positive bacteria. Findings in Streptomyces may be applicable to the signaling mechanisms of medically relevant pathogens.
Faculty Jennifer Bennett (corresponding author) began this work as a teaching postdoctoral fellow at Juniata College as a principal investigator of her own laboratory and is currently an Assistant Professor of Biology in the Department of Biology and Earth Science at Otterbein University. The article was published in collaboration with Mark Gomelsky, Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Wyoming.
Student Travis Hull, co-first author, identified the first gene and partially characterized the two mutants for a Senior Honors Thesis. Travis is pursuing an MD/PhD as an NIH Fellow at the University of Alabama. Mathew Sullivan conducted bioinformatics his senior year and attends the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Nikolai Klena conducted research the summer after freshman year and defended a Senior Honors Thesis. He is a technician at the University of Pittsburgh, applying for PhD programs. Ryan Johnson conducted junior research and defended a Senior Honors Thesis. He is a PhD candidate in Emerging Infectious Diseases at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Robert Geiger began research the summer following freshman year and is an Otterbein junior biochemistry major.
Funding Travis, Nikolai awarded American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and von Liebig Undergraduate Research Fellowships (URF); Bobby, Merck-AAAS URF; Ryan, ASM URF, Sigma Xi; Jennifer, von Liebig Foundation, Merck-AAAS; Mark, NSF.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Effect of Rosehip (Rosa Canina) Extracts on Human Brain Tumor Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis
Citation Journal of Cancer Therapy, 2012; 5: 534-545, Cagle P, Idassi O, Carpenter J, Minor R, Goktepe I, Martin P.. North Carolina A&T State University
Description The present study investigated the anti-oncogenic properties of rosehip extracts against human brain tumor cell proliferation. Rosehips are blossoms from the wild rose (Rosa canina) plant and previous reports have shown that rosehip extracts have the potential to reduce cell growth in breast cancer cells. With this knowledge, we examined the antiproliferative effect of rosehip extracts on three human glioblastoma (brain tumor) cell lines (A-172, U-251MG and U-1242MG) and we hypothesized that rosehip extracts would reduce cell proliferation in these cell lines. Following treatment with rosehip extracts each cell line demonstrated a significant decrease in cell proliferation. Additionally, we also demonstrated that rosehip extracts had a greater growth inhibitory effect than Temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat brain tumors.
Faculty Patrick Martin is an assistant professor of biology.
Student Ombeni Idassi, is a sophomore biology major, that participated in this research as a summer pre-matriculation program for advanced students prior to his freshman year. He continued to participate in this project during his freshman year.Ombeni is currently a sophomore biology major at North Carolina A&T State University and is an inaugural member of the Early Assurance Medical Scholars Program between The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University and North Carolina A&T State University.
Funding This research was supported by a National Cancer Institute Collaborative award (NIH-NCI 1P20CA138020-01); and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS 5P20MD000546-07).

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Title Measuring standardized effect size improves interpretation of biomonitoring studies and facilitates meta-analysis
Citation Freshwater Sci, 2012; 31: 3:800-812, McCabe DJ, Hayes-Pontius EM, Canepa A, Berry KS, Levine BC.. Saint Michael 's College
Description This study illustrated the advantages of measuring standardized effect size (SES) when comparing habitats. SES expresses the size of differences as unitless metrics making it possible to directly compare and rank differences measured at different scales or using different units. Nets were the simplest and least expensive approach used in this study and they consistently outperformed other techniques. ranked techniques and benthic metrics
Faculty Declan McCabe is an associate professor in biology
Student All student coauthors completed this research as summer interns participating in Vermont EPSCoR 's Streams Project during the summer of 2009. Erin is completing her masters degree in the State University of New York in Plattsburgh. Alexandra is in Nova Southeastern University completing her masters degree. Kaitlyn is currently serving in the United States Navy. Bridget served as an interpretive Naturalist and is currently applying to graduate programs.
Funding This work was supported by NSF grant EPS 0701410 to Vermont EPSCoR with additional funding from the Hartnett Endowment and Saint Michael 's college VPAA Karen Talentino.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Stress response and virulence functions of the Acinetobacter baumannii NfuA Fe-S scaffold protein
Citation J Bacteriol., 2012; 194: 11:2884-2893, Zimbler DL, Park TM, Arivett BA, Penwell WF, Greer SM, Woodruff TM, Tierney DL, Actis LA.. Miami University
Description The present study examined the role of the NfuA iron-cluster protein in the bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, which causes severe infections among compromised patients, particularly injured soldiers. This protein proved to be important in critical bacterial iron utilization processes, as well as protection from damaging oxidative-stress responses A. baumannii encounters during the infection of the human host.
Faculty Luis A. Actis is professor and chair of the Department of Microbiology.
Student Thomas Park conducted this work during his junior and senior years at Miami University. This work was a component of the NSF URM program in which he participated as well as his Honors Thesis. Thomas is currently enrolled in the University of Cincinnati Medical School.
Funding This work was supported by Public Health grant AI070174 grant, NSF 0420479 and CHE0839233 grants, and Miami University funds. Thomas was supported by funds from the NSF URM award DBI-0731634.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title AhrdCyp1a2(/) mice show increased susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity
Citation NeuroToxicology., 2012; 33: 1436-1442, Curran CP, Altenhofen E, Ashworth A, Brown A, Kamau-Cheggeh C, Curran MA, Evans A, Floyd R, Fowler, J, Garber H, Hays B, Kraemer S, Lang, A, Mynhier A, Samuels A, Strohmaier C.. Northern Kentucky University
Description The study identified genetic differences that increase susceptibility to neurotoxicity following prenatal and early life exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs are persistent organic pollutants commonly found in the human food supply. A mouse model was used to mimic known human variation in two genes related to PCB metabolism. The long-term goal is to identify humans at highest risk and improve public health interventions.
Faculty Christine Perdan Curran is an assistant professor in the Northern Kentucky University Department of Biological Sciences and a faculty member in the interdisciplinary Neuroscience minor.
Student Emily Altenhofen, Amber Evans, Rikki Floyd,Jocelyn Fowler, Helen Garber,Sarah Kraemer,Andrea Mynhier and Ashton Samuels have all graduated since working on this project. Rikki is in physician assistant's school at NOVA Southeastern, and Sarah is in vet school at Ross. All others are pursuing future opportunities in biomedical or veterinary medicine. Austin has been accepted into medical school. Amy and Anna plan careers in medicine or biomedical research. Cellestine plans to pursue graduate studies in public health. Carly and Austin are completing Honors Thesis projects related to the published work. Breann Hays is interested in a toxicology career.
Funding This project was supported by NIH grants 5P20RR016481-12 and 8P20GM103436-12, the Kentucky NSF EPSCoR Startup Fund (RSF-034-07),the NKU Faculty Development program and NKU Center for Integrative Natural Science and Mathematics.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 promotes transcriptional repression of integrated retroviruses
Citation J. Virol., 2013; 87: 5:Bueno MTD, Reyes D, Valdes L, Saheba A, Urias E, Mendoza C, Fregoso OI, Llano M.. University of Texas at El Paso
Description We have identified a novel mechanism of the cellular protein Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in the preservation of the cellular genome. Retroviruses are viruses that replicate by inserting a copy of their genome into the host genome. This replication strategy alters the integrity of the cellular genome leading to disease. We have discovered that PARP-1 counteracts the transcription of retroviral genomes that invade the cellular genome, thus limiting the phenotypic changes induced by retroviral infection.
Faculty Dr. Manuel Llano is an Assistant Professor in the Biological Sciences Department
Student Crystal Mendoza and Adarsh Saheba are undergraduate seniors. They have worked in Dr Llano’s lab for 2 years. Crystal is applying to graduate school and Adarsh to medical school. Eduardo Urias is a sophomore and has been in Dr Llano’s lab since his freshman year. Eduardo presented a poster at the 2011 UTEP End-of-Summer Research Symposium.
Funding Crystal Mendoza was supported by the RISE program (NIGMS-5R25GM069621-09). Eduardo Urias was supported by a Research-Teaching Integration program (NSF-DUE-1140469). The research was funded by NIH grant 5SC1AI098238 to Dr. Llano.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Targeting Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (JAK3) with an inhibitor induces secretion of TGF-β by CD4+ T cells.
Citation Cell Mol Immunol., 2012; 9: 4:350-360, Cetkovic-Cvrlje M, Olson M, Ghate K.. St. Cloud State University (SCSU)
Description The study examined mechanism of the protective treatment against autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice with an inhibitor of a particular signaling molecule called Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (JAK3). Our results suggest an induction of TGF-β-secreting regulatory T cells as the underlying mechanism for protective anti-diabetogenic effects obtained by the treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor.
Faculty Marina Cetkovic-Cvrlje is a professor of Immunology in the Department of Biological Sciences at SCSU.
Student Marin Olson was undergraduate researcher in the Immunology Laboratory during her junior and senior years at SCSU who studied immunopathology of mouse autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Marin is currently enrolled in a Cell/Molecular graduate program in Biology at SCSU.
Funding The research was supported by several SCSU OSP Student Research Funds to Olson; NSF MRI grant and SCSU OSP Researchers Grant and Hellervik Prize were awarded to Cetkovic-Cvrlje.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a candidate target gene of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in the testis.
Citation Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology., 2012; 10: DOI: 10.1186/1477-7827-10-104, Palladino, MA, Shah, A, Tyson, R, Horvath, J, Dugan, C, Karpodinis, M.. Monmouth University
Description This study identified the Mcl-1 gene as an antiapoptotic target gene for the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in the rat testis. HIF-1 plays important roles in controlling oxygen microenvironments by androgen-producing cells (Leydig cells) of the testis but little is known about downstream targets of HIF-1. A role for HIF-1 in activation of Mcl-1 and protection of Leydig cells from apoptosis during clinical conditios that affect oxygen levels in the testis is proposed.
Faculty Michael Palladino is Dean of the School of Science and Associate Professor of Biology at Monmouth University
Student Five co-authors were Monmouth University undergradaute students when the studies described in this manuscript were carried out and they have all graduated. Anoop Shah is currently a medical student at Drexel University College of Medicine. Rebecca Tyson is currently a student in the physician’s assistant program at Seton Hall University. Jaclyn Horvath is currently a nursing student at Brookdale Community College. Christine Dugan is currently employed by Church and Dwight and Marie Karpodinis is employed by Laureate Pharma.
Funding This research was supported by National Institutes of Health grant NIH R15-HD046451 to M.A.P.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The Anticancer Ruthenium Complex KP1019 Induces DNA Damage, Leading to Cell Cycle Delay and Cell Death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Citation Mol Pharmacol., 2013; 83: 1:225-34, Stevens SK, Strehle AP, Miller RL, Gammons SH, Hoffman KJ, McCarty JT, Miller ME, Stultz LK, Hanson PK.. Birmingham-Southern College and Rhodes College
Description This study established that the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an appropriate model system for examining the effect of the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 on cell physiology. Similar to what has been seen in cancer cells, KP1019 inhibits yeast growth, damages DNA, and remains effective against cell types that are resistant to other chemotherapy drugs. Novel findings include the identification of translesion synthesis as the major contributor to KP1019-induced mutations.
Faculty Pamela Hanson is an associate professor of biology at BSC. Laura Stultz is a professor of chemistry at BSC. Mary Miller is an associate professor of biology at Rhodes College.
Student Shannon Stevens worked on this project as part of her 2007 senior thesis; she is now an intellectual property lawyer. Amy Strehle worked on this project as part of her 2010 senior thesis. Rebecca Miller 's contribution was made through a 2011 independent study project; she is now a graduate student at The Scripps Research Institute. Sarah Gammons worked on this project as part of her 2007 senior thesis; she is currently in medical school at UAB. Kyle Hoffman contributed to this project during the summer of 2012 and is currently a sophomore at BSC. John McCarty worked on this project as part of his 2007 senior thesis; he is currently in medical school at KCUMB.
Funding This project has been supported by the AAAS-Merck Undergraduate Science Research Program and the Associated Colleges of the South Faculty Renewal Program as well as by BSC and Rhodes.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Predator occupancy rates in a thinned ponderosa pine forest, Arizona: A pilot study
Citation Wildlife Society Bulletin., 2012; 36: 2:232-239, Barrett KJ, Kalies EL, Chambers CL.. Northern Arizona University
Description Forest thinning in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) reduces threat of wildfire and increases diversity across the landscape. We documented occurrence of predators at 33 sites across a range of tree densities using track plates and motion-sensitive cameras. Thinning had a positive influence on gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and coyote (Canis latrans) abundance but negative on raccoon (Procyon lotor). Predator occupancy can be assessed at large spatial scales using occupancy modeling, especially using cameras.
Faculty Carol Chambers is a professor of wildlife ecology in the School of Forestry.
Student Kevin Barrett wrote the research proposal, received funding, and conducted this project in his junior year after receiving funding from the Hooper Undergraduate Award program. His project was in conjunction with Elizabeth Kalies, PhD candidate, now graduated. Kevin graduated from the School of Forestry in 2010 and has since completed his Masters at Yale School of Forestry. He is employed in wildlife ecology in Colorado.
Funding The research was funded through a Hooper Undergraduate Award and the Ecological Restoration Institute at NAU.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Impact of a Gill Parasite Upon the Minnow Notropis telescopus
Citation Southeast. Nat., 2012; 11: 1:35-42, Adrian AB, Holmes B, Stallsmith BW. University of Alabama in Huntsville
Description Dactylogyrus is a genus of flatworms that infects the gills of cyprinid fishes. Little is known about their life history. The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine 1) whether Dactylogyrus exhibits seasonality in its life cycle, and 2) if there is any potential effect upon reproductive effort of the host as a result of Dactylogyrus infection. Over a 12-month period, Dactylogyrus was found on the gills of Notropis telescopus (Telescope Shiner), a cyprinid fish collected in the Paint Rock River in Alabama. Assumptions that parasite presence is evenly distributed among hosts and within each month were rejected, March through July being a peak for the extent of Dactylogyrus infection. This is reproductive season in Telescope Shiners.
Faculty Bruce Stallsmith is assistant professor of biology.
Student Andrew is currently in a doctoral program in biology at the University of Iowa. This project was the subject of his honors thesis, and was also part of a summer REU project.
Funding Andrew received a summer REU grant from the Faculty Senate of the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Crucial elements that maintain the interactions between the regulatory TnaC peptide and the ribosome exit tunnel responsible for Trp inhibition of ribosome function
Citation Nucleic Acids Res., 2012; 40: 5:2247-2257, Martínez AK, Shirole NH, Murakami S, Benedik MJ, Sachs MS, Cruz-Vera LR.. University of Alabama in Huntsville
Description This study examined the molecular factors involved in the recognition of newly synthesized proteins by the cellular protein-making machinery, the ribosome. Genetic and biochemical experiments were performed to reveal ribosomal molecules that affect the production of proteins and expression of genes. These results open future experiments involving the generation of antibiotics inhibitors of the protein synthesis and bacterial growth.
Faculty Luis R. Cruz Vera is an assistant professor of Biological Sciences
Student Shino Murakami was an undergraduate student at the biological sciences at UAH where she performed part of the work published in this article. Shino is currently a doctoral candidate in the program of Genes and Development at the UT-Southwestern Medical Center.
Funding Shino 's work was supported by the Research experiences for undergraduates program sponsored by University of Alabama in Huntsville and Alabama Space Grant Consortium.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Evidence for distinct mechanisms of uptake and antitumor activity of secretory phospholipase A2 responsive liposome in prostate cancer
Citation Integrative Biology, 2012; 0: 1-10, Mock JN, Costyn LJ, Wilding SL, Arnold RD, Cummings BS.. University of Georgia
Description The research investigated the use of targeted nanoparticles composed of lipids for the treatment of prostate cancer. The goal was to determine if it was possible to alter the composition of these nanoparticles to enhance their ability to kill prostate cancer cells, compared to clinically used treatments. The significance of the study is that over expression of secretory phospholipase A2 and its receptors in tumors may be exploited to control drug delivery of liposomes. Liposomes are lipid-based nanoparticles that show promise to enhance drug delivery and increase tumor cell death. Work presented in this paper describes how liposomes may be tailored to contain specific lipids that make them more potent in cancer cells.
Faculty Dr. Brian S. Cummings is Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Georgia. He is also Director of the Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program and a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar.
Student Stephanie Lauren Wilding participated in the research the summer after her sophomore year through a 2012 CURO (Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities) summer fellowship. Her role in the research was to determine the efficacy of the anti‐cancer drug doxorubicin in three different cancer cells lines. She is now a junior majoring in Genetics and continues to work with Dr. Cummings in the lab.
Funding This work was supported through funding from the NIH.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Immune stimulating photoactive hybrid nanoparticles for metastatic breast cancer
Citation Integrative Biology., 2012; 0: Marrache S, Choi JH, Tundup S, Zaver D, Harn DA, Dhar S.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description Benefitting from a unique use among expertise in different areas, chemistry, immunology, and nanotechnology, we have developed an engineered nanoparticle (NP) platform, which uses a combination of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and the immune system for effective management of metastatic breast cancer. Chemotherapy remains the backbone of systemic therapy to treat breast cancer. However, in the setting of metastatic form, single agent based chemotherapy is not effective and it is reasonably apparent that the search for a single-component therapeutic may not be useful. Nanotechnology holds significant promise as the next generation cancer therapeutic modality. The clinical utility of this multi-drug NP could make a major advance for the care of patients with metastatic breast cancer.
Faculty Dr. Shanta Dhar is Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Georgia.
Student Dillon Zaver participated in the research during the spring 2012 semester of his junior year through undergraduate Honors research courses offered by the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities (CURO) at the University of Georgia. He is now a senior Biochemistry and Biology major and continues to work in Dr. Dhar’s lab on several other projects. He is currently applying to medical school.
Funding The research was supported by a start-up grant from the NIH (P30 GM 092378) to UGA and by the Office of the Vice President for Research, UGA to S.D.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Biosynthesis of UDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose and UDP-rhamnose in Pathogenic Fungi Magnaporthe grisea and Botryotinia fuckeliana
Citation J Biol Chem., 2012; 287: 2:879-92, Martinez V, Ingwers M, Smith J, Glushka J, Yang T, Bar-Peled M.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description Rhamnose-containing glycans are involved in host-pathogen interactions. In the present study UDP-rhamnose was identified in fungi; recombinant enzymes involved in its synthesis were characterized, and the genes involved are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. It was concluded that fungi containing rhamnose likely utilize the UDP-rhamnose pathway. Understanding rhamnose pathways in fungi may provide new insight to fungus-host interaction.
Faculty Dr. Maor Bar-Peled is Associate Professor of Plant Biology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Viviana Martinez participated in the research starting in May 2010 until graduating in December 2011 through undergraduate independent research courses. She graduated with a degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and is currently employed at the University of Georgia.
Funding This work was supported in part by NSF Grant IOB-0453664 (to M. B.-P.) and by BioEnergy Science Center Grant DE-PS02- 06ER64304 (supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Biosynthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP-galacturonic acid in Bacillus cereus subsp. cytotoxis NVH 391-98
Citation The FEBS Journal., 2012; 279: 1:100-112, Broach B, Gu X, Bar-Peled M.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description The paper details the cloning and functional characterization of two genes in the human pathogen Bacillus cereus encoding enzymes involved in the production of uronic acid nucleotides. The results provide insight into the formation and function of uronic acid-containing glycans in the lifecycle of B. cereus and in related species with homologous operons, as well as the basis for determining the importance of these acidic glycans.
Faculty Dr. Maor Bar-Peled is Associate Professor of Plant Biology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Bryan Broach participated in the research from the summer of 2010 to the summer of 2011 through independent undergraduate research courses offered by the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department. He graduated in May 2011 with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He is currently a second year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia.
Funding Research was supported by NSF: IOB-0453664 (M.B.-P.) and the BioEnergy Science Center (Grant DE-PS02-06ER64304), itself supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Genetic Analysis of Floral Symmetry in Van Gogh's Sunflowers Reveals Independent Recruitment of CYCLOIDEA Genes in the Asteraceae
Citation PLoS Genetics., 2012; 8: 3:1-10, Chapman MA, Tang S, Draeger D, Nambeesan S, Shaffer H, Barb JG, Knapp SJ, Burke JM.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description Species in the flowering plant family Asteraceae exhibit flower heads that can contain both bilaterally and radially symmetric flowers. In this study, we identify a CYCLOIDEA-like gene that is responsible for determining flower symmetry in sunflower. Mis-expression of this gene causes a double-flowered phenotype, similar to those captured in Vincent van Gogh’s famous nineteenth century paintings, whereas loss of gene function causes radialization of the normally bilaterally symmetric ray florets. Interestingly, this gene is not orthologous to the CYCLOIDEA-like gene responsible for floral symmetry in other members of the Asteraceae, providing evidence of the parallel recruitment of different members of the same gene family for the same function.
Faculty Dr. John M. Burke is Professor of Plant Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Hunter Shaffer was employed in Dr. Burke’s lab during his sophomore and junior years. During his senior year he participated in the research as part of a Biochemistry independent research project. He graduated in May 2012 with a major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and is currently employed full-time in Dr. Burke’s lab. Hunter plans on working as an EMT this upcoming year before starting medical school in 2013.
Funding This work was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Gloeckner Foundation.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Evidence of Preorganization in Quinonoid Intermediate Formation from L-Trp in H463F Mutant Escherichia coli Tryptophan Indole-lyase from Effects of Pressure and pH
Citation Biochemistry., 2012; 51: 33:6527-33, Phillips RS, Kalu U, Hay S.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description In this research, we studied the reaction mechanism of the enzyme using rapid kinetic techniques. The reaction rates were measured at different pH values and at pressures up to 2000 atmospheres. The results suggest that the substrate complex must be in a specific conformation for the reaction to proceed.
Faculty Dr. Robert S. Phillips is Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Ukoha Kalu was involved in the research from the fall of 2009 through the spring semester of 2011 through undergraduate independent research courses. He won third place for presenting the research in a poster competition at the 2010 LSAMP (Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation) Conference. He graduated in May 2011 with a major in Biological Science and is currently employed at Emory University Hospital. He is in the process of applying to medical school.
Funding The project was funded by the University of Georgia.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The Redder the Better: Wing Color Predicts Flight Performance in Monarch Butterflies
Citation PLoS ONE., 2012; 7: 7:Davis AK, Chi J, Bradley C, Altizer S.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description This study examines the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration and distance. It was concluded that monarchs with redder (deeper orange) wings had increased flight performance. The results suggest that pigment deposition onto wing scales during metamorphosis could be linked with traits that influence flight, such as thorax muscle size, energy storage or metabolism. The results reinforce an association between wing color and flight performance in insects and provide an important starting point for work focused on mechanistic links between insect movement and color.
Faculty Dr. Sonia Altizer is Associate Professor in the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia.
Student Jean Chi first worked on this research as a 2008 CURO (Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities) project and in the spring of 2009 used the material for her Honors thesis. Following graduation from the University of Georgia with a BS in Ecology, Jean completed a MSc degree in Applied Ecology through the Erasmus Mundus European Master Program at the University of East Anglia.
Funding The research was supported by CURO and a National Science Foundation research grant (DEB-0643831).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule Activators of the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme
Citation J Biomol Screen., 2012; 0: 1-14, Kukday SS, Manandhar SP, Ludley MC, Burriss ME, Alper BJ, Schmidt WK.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description This study identifies small molecules that enhance the enzymatic activity of the mammalian Insulin Degrading Enzyme (IDE). IDE has multiple substrates, of which the Abeta peptide is the most notorious because of its proposed role in the development of Alzheimer 's disease. Enhancing IDE activity is thus viewed as a potential therapeutic approach for reducing the elevated levels of Abeta that are associated with the disease state.
Faculty Dr. Walter K. Schmidt is Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Marissa C. Ludley participated in the research for three semesters from 2008-2009 and Mary E. “Betsy” Burriss for five from 2009-2011, both as part of an independent research project. Mary also wrote an Honors thesis based on the research during the spring of 2011. Marissa’s role was to evaluate the effect of small molecules on enzymes other than IDE to assess the target specificity of the molecules. Mary’s role was to clone, express, and evaluate the effect of small molecules on the worm (C. elegans) version of mammalian IDE. Both graduated with Biochemistry and Molecular Biology majors, Marissa in 2010 and Mary in 2011. Marissa is currently a third year dental student while Mary is a second year medical student.
Funding The research was supported by NIGMS (NIH) and the Alzheimer 's Drug Discovery Foundation (Institute for the Study of Aging).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title JBP1 and JBP2 proteins are Fe2+/2-OG dependent dioxygenases regulating the hydroxylation of thymidine residues in trypanosome DNA
Citation J Biol Chem., 2012; 287: 24:19886-95, Cliffe LJ, Hirsch G, Wang J, Ekanayake D, Bullard W, Hu M, Wang Y, Sabatini R.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description Background: Base J regulates Pol II transcription.Results: JBP1 and -2 stimulate the first step of base J synthesis: hydroxylation of thymidine.Conclusion: JBP are Fe2+/2-OG-dependent-dependent dioxygenases sensitive to physiologically relevant O2 tensions.Significance: These results predict that JBPs can act as oxygen sensors regulating trypanosome gene expression and adaption to different host niches.
Faculty Dr. Robert Sabatini is Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Muhan Hu, an undergraduate Biochemistry major, worked on the project starting the spring semester of her sophomore year, earning Honors credit. She is currently a senior and plans to continue the research for her senior thesis.
Funding This work was supported, in whole or in part, by NIH Grants 2R56AI063523-07A1 (to R. S.) and R01 CA101864 (to Y. W.).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats.
Citation Behav. Brain Res., 2012; 235: 73-81, Adams, SE, Heckard D, Hassell, J, Uphouse, L.. Texas Woman 's University
Description The effects of the antidepressant, fluoxetine, on sexual receptivity, proceptivity and partner preference were examined. Fluoxetine inhibited sexual receptivity and proceptivity but did not reduce the female’s preference for spending time near the male incentive. Active investigation while near the male was suppressed by fluoxetine but this probably reflected the drug’s effect on activity and not sexual interest. These findings further efforts to develop an animal model for the study of antidepressant-induced female sexual dysfunction and illustrate the value of using several behavioral paradigms in the assessment.
Faculty Lynda Uphouse is a Professor of Biology.
Student Sarah Adams completed the research while an undergraduate biology/chemistry major at Texas Woman’s University. Sarah’s research was completed as her Capstone project in TWU’s honor’s program. Sarah worked her junior(2011) and senior (2012) years on the project. Sarah is now a graduate student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Danyeal and James worked in the lab doing Independent Study research as undergraduate students. James entered the lab as a member of the BRIDGES to the Baccalaureate NIH funded grant. Danyeal is a graduate student at Meharry Medical College and James is a graduate student at University of South Dakota
Funding NIH: HD28419, GM058397 and TWU Research Enhancement Program

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title In-microbe formation of nucleotide sugars in engineered Escherichia coli.
Citation Anal Biochem., 2012; 421: 2:691-8, Yang T, Bar-Peled Y, Smith JA, Glushka J, Bar-Peled M.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description We demonstrated the use of Escherichia coli metabolically engineered to contain genes that encode proteins which convert simple sugars into sugar phosphates and into nucleotide-sugars. We showed that this E. coli system that we named 'in-microbe ' is an excellent system to produce sugar-nucleotides for commercial and research use. This research lead to a Patent Registration process.
Faculty Dr. Maor Bar-Peled is Associate Professor of Plant Biology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Yael Bar-Peled began working on this project when she was as a joint enrollment student, enrolled at the University of Georgia while a high school student. She is currently a UGA junior majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
Funding

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The PDZ1 and PDZ3 Domains of MAGI-1 Regulate the Eight Exon Isoform of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor
Citation J Virol., 2012; 86: 17:9244-54, Kolawole AO, Sharma P, Yan R, Lewis KJ, Hostetler HA, Ashbourne Excoffon KJ.. Wright State University
Description This manuscript demonstrates that the eight exon isoform of CAR (CAREx8) and susceptibility to apical adenovirus (AdV) infection is differentially regulated by two different PDZ domains of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1. Whereas PDZ3 sequesters CAREx8 within the cell and reduces AdV infection, PDZ1 protects CAREx8 from MAGI-1-mediated loss and rescues AdV infection.
Faculty Dr. Katherine Excoffon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences
Student Kyle Lewis was an undergraduate research assistant (2010-2011) and is currently a Ph.D. student at Baylor College of Medicine.
Funding This work was funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIH) 1R15AI090625-01 and a Wright State University Undergraduate Research Grant

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Accessibility of the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and its importance in adenovirus gene transduction efficiency
Citation Journal of General Virology, 2012; 93: 155-8, Sharma P, Kolawole AO, Wiltshire SM, Frondorf K, Excoffon KJ. Wright State University
Description This manuscript shows that intact tight junctions affect the accessibility of CAR and hence the susceptibility of polarized and non-polarized cells to AdV infection.
Faculty Dr. Katherine Excoffon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences.
Student Sydney Wiltshire was an undergraduate research assistant (2010-2011) and is currently a M.D. student at Wright State University Boonshoft College of Medicine
Funding This work was funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIH) 1R15AI090625-01 and a Wright State University Undergraduate Research Grant.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Regulator of G‐protein Signaling 5 reduces HeyA8 ovarian cancer cell proliferation and extends survival in a murine tumor model
Citation Biochem Res Int., 2012; 2012: Altman MK, Nguyen DT, Patel SB, Fambrough JM, Beedle AM, Hardman WJ, Murph MM.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description The publication describes a protein, RGS5, which we initially thought would reduce the growth rate of tumors, but in contrast, it 's effects are more complex. Although it did not affect the growth rate, mice bearing RGS5‐expressing tumors had an increased survival rate and their tumors displayed enhanced regions of necrosis. Striking effects on the vasculature system were also noted, which significantly alters chemotherapy delivery into tumors. In summary, regulation of RGS5 expression in tumors has a dual nature in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and would not be considered a single target for therapeutic modulation.
Faculty Dr. Mandi Murph is Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences in the College of Pharmacy at the University of Georgia.
Student Both Duy T. Nguyen and Santosh B. Patel participated in the research through undergraduate research courses and summer research opportunities, with Santosh additionally earning Honors credit. Duy graduated in December 2010 with a double major in Biology and Psychology and is currently applying to dental school. Santosh graduated in May 2012 with a degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and is currently a first year medical student. Jada M. Fambrough, a current senior majoring in Biology and Psychology, worked on the project through Honors research courses and for one semester without earning course credit. She hopes to attend medical school after graduating in May 2013.
Funding This work was supported by the Georgia Cancer Coalition (now the GRA) and the National Institutes of Health (1R15CA151006-01, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act).

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title The N-terminus and the chain-length determination (CLD) domain play a role in the determination of the isoprenoid product length in the bifunctional Toxoplasma gondii farnesyl-diphosphate/geranylgeranyl-diphosphate synthase
Citation Biochemistry., 2012; 0: Li Z-H, Cintrón R, Koon NA, Moreno SNJ.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description The work is about the characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii enzyme which is part of the isoprenoid pathway. This T. gondii enzyme is peculiar when compared to other enzymes from other organisms because it has a bifunctional activity. Because of this peculiarity the enzyme could be a good target for chemotherapy against toxoplasmosis.
Faculty Dr. Silvia N. J. Moreno is a Professor in the Department of Cellular Biology at the University of Georgia.
Student Noah A. Koon participated in the research through Honors research courses taken during his last two years as an undergraduate at UGA. Noah’s role was the kinetic characterization of several mutant versions of the enzyme as well as the purification of the proteins. He presented his results as a poster at the 2008 UGA CURO (Center for Undergraduate Research) Symposium. He graduated in May 2009 with High Honors and majors in History, Japanese Language and Literature and Cellular Biology and is currently a Junior High School teacher in Fukuoka, Japan. He plans to return to the United States next year to attend medical school.
Funding The work was funded by the NIH.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title hs3A/hs1,2 or hs3B/hs4 is sufficient to mediate TCDD-induced inhibition of the 3'Igh in a transgenic B-cell line
Citation Toxicological Sciences, the Toxicologist, 2012; 125: 1618, Johnson, B., Panchal, J.L., Romer, E., Wourms, M., Sulentic, C. E. W.. Wright State University
Description Luciferase reporter plasmids (pGL3 backbone, Promega) have been utilized to characterize the transcriptional effects of the environmental contaminant dioxin and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands. The AhR is a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression by binding dioxin response elements in genes sensitive to dioxin. This work characterized a dioxin response element inadvertently located within the pGL3 luciferase plasmid backbone and demonstrated transcriptional activity that inappropriately influenced our promoter and enhancer analyses.
Faculty Courtney Sulentic is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Student Brooke Johnson was a Research Assistant from 3/2011 to12/2011 and a NIEHS 2011 Summer Research Fellow. She is currently a BioSTAR Fellow (1/2012-present) and a 4th year Biological Sciences student.
Funding The funding source was from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title A dioxin response element in the multiple cloning site of the pGL3 luciferase reporter influences transcriptional activity
Citation Toxicology in Vitro, 2012; 26: 979-984, Fernando, T., Fecher, R., Ochs, S., Sulentic, C. E. W. Wright State University
Description Dioxin is a potent and persistent environmental contaminant, which markedly suppresses immune function, particularly antibody expression. Antibodies are an important component in maintaining health and immunity against pathogens. Altered antibody expression by chemicals could significantly impair immune function in humans or animals. This work focused on determining the molecular targets of dioxin and the mechanism for abnormal antibody expression.
Faculty Courtney Sulentic is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Student Sharon Ochs (Research Assistant, WSU Honors Program Trainee, 2/2008-8/2010) is currently accepted to Medical School), Tharu Fernando (Research Assistant, WSU honors Program Trainee, 1/2006-12/2007; and NIEHS 2007 Summer Research Fellow) is currently in a PhD program, and Roger Fecher (WSU Honors Program Trainee, 12/2006-5/2008) is currently in Medical School
Funding The funding source was the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

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Recorded at: 12/5/2013
Title Sequence Polymorphism, Segmental Recombination and Toggling Amino Acid Residues within the DBL3X Domain of the VAR2CSA Placental Malaria Antigen
Citation PLoS ONE., 2012; 7: 2:1-11, Talundzic E, Shah S, Fawole O, Owino S, Moore JM, Peterson DS.. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Description We characterized the levels of sequence polymorphism within a major malaria antigen, one that contributes to the binding of parasites within the placenta of malaria infected pregnant women. We revealed evidence for diversification through intra-segmental recombination and novel mutations that likely contributed to the high number of unique VAR2CSA antigen sequence types identified in this study. We identified critical residues that may be implicated in immune evasion through switching to alternative amino acids, including an arginine residue within the predicted binding pocket in subdomain III, previously implicated in binding to placental CSA. This study contributes to understanding parasite diversity in pregnant women and will help identify epitopes and variants of DBL3X to be included in a placental malaria vaccine.
Faculty Dr. David S. Peterson is Associate Professor in the Department of Infectious Diseases at the University of Georgia.
Student Sheel Shah and Opeoluwa (Ope) Fawole participated in the study between 2007-2009 as part of an undergraduate Honors research project. Sheel worked on the research from January 2007 until graduating in May 2009 with a major in Microbiology and a minor in Religion. Both Ope and Sheel are currently medical students.
Funding This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant R01 AI050240 to JMM, and University of Georgia Department of Infectious Diseases research funds to DSP.

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Recorded at: 9/10/2012
Title Decision time and perseverationof adolescent rats in the T-maze are affected differentially by buspirone and independent of 5-HT-1A expression
Citation Pharmacol Biochem Behav., 2012; 102: 58-63, Rhoads DE, Grimes N, Kaushal S, Mallari J, Orlando K.. Monmouth University
Description The present study examined induced repetitive behaviors of rats as a model for aspects of human obsessive compulsive disorder. Rats responded to buspirone with vicarious trial and error behavior and prolonged decision time in the baited T-maze. Adolescent Long-Evans rats were uniquely unresponsive to buspirone. Receptor protein expression and a selective receptor antagonist were used to show that these effects of buspirone were independent of the brain serotonin 1A receptor.
Faculty Dennis Rhoads is a Professor of Biology.
Student Sunaina Kaushal is a medical student at Drexel University and worked for two years on this project to fulfill requirements of the University Honors program. Janine Mallari is in the process of applying to graduate and medical schools and this was her independent study project. Krystal Orlando just finished her sophomore year. She began working on this project as part of the School of Science Summer Research Program and continues doing research for Departmental Honors. She plans to apply to medical school.
Funding Research was supported by the Department and Summer Research Program, and grants from Pfizer Undergraduate Research Endeavors Science program and Benjamin Cummings/Metropolitan Association of College and University Biologists.

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Recorded at: 9/10/2012
Title Hong R, Kang TY, Michels CA, Gadura N. Membrane lipid peroxidation in copper alloy mediated contact killing. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2012 Mar;78(6):1776-84. (Queensborough Community College, Queens College, CUNY)
Citation Appl Environ Microbiol., 2012; 78: 6:1776-84, Hong R, Kang TY, Michels CA, Gadura N.. Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Description Copper alloy surfaces are passive antimicrobial sanitizing agents that kill bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. This study explores the hypothesis that nonenzymatic peroxidation of membrane phospholipids is responsible for copper alloy-mediated surface killing in in Escherichia coli. Cell survival, lipid peroxidation levels, and DNA degradation were followed in cells exposed to copper alloy surfaces containing 60 to 99.90% copper or in medium containing CuSO(4). Our results suggest that copper alloy surface-mediated killing of E. coli is triggered by nonenzymatic oxidative damage of membrane phospholipids that ultimately results in the loss of membrane integrity and cell death.
Faculty Nidhi Gadura is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Geology at Queensborough Community College. . All the work for the publication was done at the newly established Biotechnology lab at Queensborough in collaboration with Dr. Corinne Michels (Distinguished Professor Emerita) from Queens College.
Student Tae Y. Kang started the project in 2008 as part of NSF-STEP program and has gone on to complete his PA program and is currently working. Robert Hong took over the project in 2010 as an NSF-REU student and is still enrolled at Queensborough, he plans to pursue a Ph.D. in the near future.
Funding The project was funded by PSC-CUNY grants and Copper Development Association grants to Nidhi Gadura.

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Recorded at: 9/10/2012
Title Long-term effects of fire, livestock herbivory removal, and weather variability in Texas semiarid savanna.
Citation Rangeland Ecol Manag., 2012; 65: 21-30, Taylor Jr. CA, Twidwell D, Garza NE, Rosser C, Hoffman JK, Brooks TD.. Texas A&M University
Description This experimental study examined how the occurrence and structure of grasses and woody plants changed after 12 years of a fire season manipulation and removal of livestock herbivores. Findings from the study suggest that fire can reduce or eliminate woody plant species that threaten the stability of live oak savannas while having little long-term effect on grasses desired by rangeland managers.
Faculty Dirac Twidwell is a recent doctoral graduate and instructor of the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, and Charles Taylor, Jr., is a professor and research station superintendent of the Texas Agrilife Research Center.
Student James Hoffman worked on the project in 2009 as an enrolled student in a newly developed course in which a PhD-student (Dirac) instructed undergraduate students on scientific research in ecology. James is currently traveling and working abroad.
Funding Support from Texas A&M University was used to provide opportunities for undergraduates, like James, to present their research from the course at internationally themed scientific conferences.

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Recorded at: 9/10/2012
Title Bystander Exposure to Ultra-Low-Volume Insecticide Applications Used for Adult Mosquito Management
Citation Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health., 2011; 8: 2142-2152, Preftakes CJ, Schleier III JJ, Peterson RKD.. Montana State University
Description A popular and effective management option for adult mosquitoes is the use of insecticides applied by ultra-low-volume (ULV) equipment. However, there is a paucity of data on human dermal exposure to insecticides applied by this method. The objective of the current study was to estimate dermal exposures to the insecticide active ingredient permethrin using water- (Aqua-Reslin) and oil-based (Permanone) formulations with passive dosimetry. No significant differences in deposition of permethrin were observed between years, distance from the spray source, front or back of the body, or the placement of the patches on the body. The estimated exposures support the findings of previous risk assessments that exposure to ULV applications used for mosquito management are below regulatory levels of concern.
Faculty Robert K. D. Peterson is a professor of entomology.
Student Collin is an undergraduate at Montana State University majoring in Environmental Science. The research was conducted in 2009 and 2010. Collin is the senior author of the study and led the study while a undergraduate technician in Robert's lab.
Funding The research was funded by a grant from the USDA Western Regional IPM grant program, and by the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA.

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Recorded at: 9/10/2012
Title Functional Validation of Hydrophobic Adaptation to Physiological Temperature in the Small Heat Shock Protein αA-crystallin
Citation PLoS One., 2012; 7: 3:e34438, Posner M, Kiss AJ, Skiba J, Drossman A, Dolinska MB, Hejtmancik JF, Sergeev YV.. Ashland University
Description This study examined the evolution of protective function in the small heat shock protein αA-crystallin. Small heat shock proteins are used to maintain cellular health in many cell types and their dysfunction is related to diseases such as Alzheimer’s, cataract and cancer. By examining the structure and function of αA-crystallins from six fish species adapted to different environmental temperatures we identified two amino acid changes that increase this protein’s ability to prevent the aggregation of other proteins. Our results show that a comparative approach can be used for insight into the design of small heat shock proteins with enhanced protective ability.
Faculty Mason Posner is Professor of Biology and Chair of the Department of Biology/Toxicology at Ashland University.
Student Jackie Skiba graduated in 2010 and currently works in quality control for the coffee division of the Smuckers Corporation. Amy Drossman graduated in 2011 and is continuing her studies at the Illinois College of Optometry.
Funding This research was supported by an AREA grant from the National Eye Institute (R15 EY13535) to Mason Posner.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Detection and analysis of Staphylococcus aureus isolates found in ambulances in the Chicago metropolitan area
Citation AJIC (American Journal of Infection Control), 2012; 40: 201-205, Rago JV, Buhs K, Makarovaite V, Patel E, Pomeroy M, Yasmine C.. Lewis University
Description The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency with which Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were found in advanced life support (ALS) ambulances throughout the Chicago metropolitan area, and to generate antibiograms for each isolate using eight clinically relevant antibiotics. Samples were obtained from 26 sites in 71 ambulances from 34 different Chicago-area municipalities. At least one S aureus isolate was found in approximately 69% of all ambulances in the study. In all, 77% of isolates showed resistance to at least one antibiotic, and 34% displayed resistance to two or more antibiotics. Some 12% of all isolates were ultimately determined to be methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA), whereas the remaining 88% were methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) with varying antibiograms.
Faculty James V. Rago is an associate professor of biology at Lewis University
Student This work was done largely in 2010 by students in the Biology department 's Undergraduate Research course. Viktorija Makarovaite recently finished her Masters in Clinical Lab Science at Rush University in Chicago. Student authors are currently employed in the field and are in the process of applying to various graduate programs.
Funding The research was funded by the Doherty Center for Aviation and Health Research (DCAHR) at Lewis University. Additional funding was provided by Lewis University’s LCARE Service Learning Initiative.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Vitamin E succinate inhibits survivin and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells
Citation Genes Nutr, 2012; 7: 1:83-89, Patacsil D, Osayi S, Tran AT, Saenz F, Yimer L, Shajahan AN, Gokhale PC, Verma M, Clarke R, Chauhan SC, Kumar D.. University of the District of Columbia
Description The present study examines the mechanisms of action of vitamin E succinate (VES) in pancreatic cancer cells. We have demonstrated that VES induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines and have identified survivin as a molecular target for VES.
Faculty Deepak Kumar is an Associate Professor of Biology and Chair of the Department of Biology and Chemistry
Student Sylvester Osayi graduated from UDC with an undergraduate degree in Biology. He finished his MD from the Medical College of Wisconsin and is currently a Surgery resident at the Ohio State University. Anh Thu Tran graduated from UDC with an undergraduate degree in Biology. She is currently pursuing Pharmacy at the Virginia Commonwealth University. Francisco Saenz graduated from UDC with an undergraduate degree in Biology and a Masters in Cancer Biology, Prevention and Control. He is employed and currently applying to doctoral programs. Lydia Yimer graduated from UDC with an undergraduate degree in Biology. She is employed and currently applying to graduate programs.
Funding The research was supported by a pilot project on NCI-U56 grant and USDA through UDC Agriculture Experiment Station. Sylvester, Anh and Lydia were funded by the HBCU-UP program at UDC.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Ecological effects on metabolic scaling: amphipod responses to fish predators in freshwater springs
Citation Ecol Monogr., 2011; 81: 4:599-618, Glazier DS, Butler EM, Lombardi SA, Deptola TJ, Reese AJ, Satterthwaite EV.. Juniata College
Description This article describes the effect of fish predators on the body-mass scaling of metabolic rate in a freshwater amphipod crustacean. We tested several hypotheses to explain this ecological effect, and conclude that it is most likely the result of size-selective predation altering the ontogeny of growth, a metabolically expensive process. We show that ecological factors may significantly influence metabolic scaling, contrary to common belief. Our results may have consequences for theoretical models that use metabolic scaling to predict the rates of various biological and ecological processes.
Faculty Doug Glazier is a professor of biology.
Student The other coauthors participated in this project as undergraduate students during 2004-2010. Eric Butler received his PhD in zoology at North Carolina State Univ.; Sara Lombardi is presently completing the requirements for a PhD in marine biology at the Univ. of Maryland; Travis Deptola obtained a MS in geological sciences at the Pennsylvania State Univ.; Andrew Reese is working as a laboratory technician; and Erin Satterthwaite is currently a marine ecology graduate student at the Univ. of California, Davis.
Funding The research was supported by grants from the Kresge Foundation and William J. von Liebig Foundation awarded to Juniata College.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Ovarian VEGF165b expression regulates follicular development, corpus luteum function and fertility
Citation Reproduction., 2012; 143: 501-11, Qiu Y, Seager M, Osman A, Castle-Miller J, Bevan H, Tortonese DJ, Murphy D, Harper SJ, Fraser HM, Donaldson LF, Bates DO.. University of Bristol
Description To determine the role of the VEGF165b isoforms in the ovulatory cycle, VEGF165b expression in marmoset ovaries was measured by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, demonstrating that the anti-angigoenic VEGF165b was expressed in the marmoset ovaries in granulosa cells and theca, and the balance of VEGF165b:VEGF165 was regulated during luteogenesis. Transgenic mice over-expressing VEGF165b in the ovary were less fertile than wild-type littermates, had reduced secondary and tertiary follicles after mating, increased atretic follicles, fewer corpora lutea and generated fewer embryos in the oviduct after mating, and these were more likely not to retain the corona radiata. These results indicate that the balance of VEGFA isoforms controls follicle progression and luteogenesis, and may regulate fertility in mammals, including in primates.
Faculty David Bates is Professor of Microvascular Biology and Medicine and director of the Microvascular Research Laboratories in the School of Physiology and Pharmacology at the University of Bristol.
Student Ahmed Osman and Matt Seager were undergraduate Physiology students working with the postdoc first author Dr Yan Qiu in prof Bates' group in the MVRL for a 12 week research project that they wrote up for their final year honours project. They are now both completing medical degrees at the University.
Funding Research was supported by the Wellcome Trust and the School of Physiology and Pharmacology

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Architecture of kangaroo rat inner medulla: Segmentation of descending thin limb of Henle’s loop.
Citation Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol., 2012; 302: R720-R726, Urity VB, Issaian T, Braun EJ, Dantzler WH, Pannabecker TL.. University of Arizona
Description One of the major functions of the mammalian kidney is to maintain body salt and water balance. The kangaroo rat is a desert species that rarely drinks water and therefore provides a good model for understanding the process of water conservation by the kidney. This study highlights several features of kangaroo rat kidney architecture and protein expression patterns involved with water and solute flows through renal tubules that may underlie the exceptional ability of the kangaroo rat kidney to minimize water loss.
Faculty Drs. Thomas Pannabecker, Eldon Braun, and William Dantzler are professors in the Dept. of Physiology, University of Arizona.
Student Vinoo Urity and Tadeh Issaian participated in this research for independent study credit during academic year and summer semesters – Vinoo for 4 years and Tadeh for 2 years. Vinoo was supported in part by the University of Arizona Undergraduate Biology Research Program and wrote an Honors thesis based on his contribution to the project. Vinoo is currently a graduate student at the University of Texas. Tadeh teaches in Tucson elementary schools. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant IOS 0952885.
Funding

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Spawning ascent durations of pelagic spawning reef fishes
Citation Curr Zool., 2012; 58: 1:95-102, Habrun CA, Sancho,G.. College of Charleston
Description The present study characterized the spawning behaviors of 13 coral reef fish species, measuring the duration of the spawning ascents in an attempt to determine which factors infleunce specific spawning behaviors. results indicate that risk of predation may not significantly influence the duration of spawning ascents of pair spawning reef fishes at our study site, while group-spawning behaviors are influenced by predation. Avoidance of egg predation by benthic organisms and female mate choice are more likely to influence the pelagic spawning behaviors of all fishes observed.
Faculty Gorka Sancho is an associate professor of Biology at College of Charleston
Student Callie just finished Veterinary School at Louisiana State University. This work was the result of an independent research project she did with me at the College of Charleston, where she graduated from in 2003 with a BS in Marine Biology.
Funding The analysis of video recordings by Callie was funded by funds from the Department of Biology at the College of Charleston

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Title Diet of three large pelagic fishes associated with drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) in the Western equatorial Indian Ocean
Citation Anim Biodiversity Conserv., 2011; 34: 2:59-66, Malone MA, Buck KM, Moreno G, Sancho G.. College of Charleston
Description This study characterized the dieat of three pelagic fish predators that are commonly associated with drifting fish aggregation devices (DFADs) employed by the purse seine tuna fishery in the Indian Ocean. Yellowfin tuna did not feed on DFAD–associated prey, while wahoo and dolphinfish did exploit resources aggregated by the DFADs, though they predominantly fed on other non–associated organisms.
Faculty Gorka Sancho is an associate professor of biology at the College of Charleston
Student Meg Malone is presently completing a Master's degree at Loyola University, studying invasive fish species in the great lakes. Kelly Buck just fisnished her Veterinary School studies at the Ohio State University. Both did independent studies in my laboratory while they worked towards their Marine Biology BS degrees at College of Charleston.
Funding This study was part of the FADIO (Fish Aggregating Devices as Instrumented Observatories of pelagic ecosystems) project, funded by the DG Research of the European Union(QLRI–CT–2002–02773).

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Ontogenetic Scaling of Metabolism, Growth, and Assimilation: Testing Metabolic Scaling Theory with Manduca sexta Larvae
Citation Physiol Biochem Zool., 2012; 85: 2:159-173, Sears KE, Kerkhoff AJ, Messerman A, Itagaki H.. Kenyon College
Description Growth in organisms is related to both metabolism and to nutrient assimilation rates. We provide evidence from caterpillars that metabolic scaling and nutrient assimilation change over ontogeny,
Faculty Andrew Kerkhoff is an associate professor of biology and mathematics. Harry Itagaki is a professor of biology and neuroscience.
Student Katie Sears and Arianne Messerman both began this work in the summer of 2009, continuing it into the subsequent academic year. They were Kenyon College Summer Science Scholars in 2009. Katie is finishing work with Teach for America en route to graduate studies; Arianne is deciding between graduate work at Yale or Duke.
Funding This research was funded by an NSF-UBM grant (DMS- 0827208) and by Kenyon College Summer Science Scholarships to Katie and Arianne.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Effect of Body Size on Expression of Manduca sexta Midgut Genes
Citation J Exp Zool A., 2012; 317: 3:141-151, Yeoh AJ, Davis K, Vela-Mendoza AV, Hartlaub BA, Gillen CM.. Kenyon College
Description We tested the hypothesis that the expression in the midgut of genes for ion transport (KAAT1, CAATCH1, masBSC, V-H-ATPase) and digestion (aminopeptidase msAPN3) vary with body size in a model caterpillar.
Faculty Brad Hartlaub is a professor of mathematics. Chris Gillen is a professor of biology.
Student Much of this work was done from 2009-2011, particularly in the summers. Aaron is applying for medical school; Kyle is in medical school; and Allison is looking toward graduate programs.
Funding We were funded by a NSF-UBM grant (DMS-0827208) and funds from the Kenyon College Summer Science Scholars Program.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title The effect of age on gestural communication in captive bonobos
Citation American Journal of Physical Anthropology., 2012; 147: 54:241, Quigley, E.M. & Marchant, L.F.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description First study to focus on effect of age in gestural communication in Pan paniscus. This publication adds to a recent focus on gestural communication in wild and captive apes and the role of gestural communication in hypothesizing about language origins
Faculty Linda F. Marchant is Chair and Professor, Department of Anthropology
Student Ellen M. Quigley was a second year Zoology major; pre-vet upon meeting Marchant to discuss interest in primate behavioral research in late 2010. Quigley received a USS 2011 award. In spring 2011, Ellen enrolled in ATH 255, Foundations of Biological Anthropology and also enrolled in an independent study with Marchant to prepare for the summer’s research. She completed IACUC training, submitted a research protocol and received approval to conduct research. She presented this research at Undergraduate Research Forum, April 2012; she submitted an abstract that was peer-reviewed and accepted to present this research at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Portland, OR, on April 13, 2012. Ellen is now completing her junior year and will graduate in May 2013
Funding USS 2011 award for research at Cincinnati Zoo; University Honors and OARS conference cost award for AAPA meetings in Portland, OR, for April 2012. CUR travel awards were unavailable.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Primate prefrontal cortex evolution: human brains are the extreme of a lateralized ape trend
Citation Brain, Behavior and Evolution., 2011; 77: 2:67-78, Smaers, J.B., Steele, J., Case, C.R., Cowper, A., Amunts, K. and Zilles, K.. University of Cambridge
Description Histological data for prefrontal cortex in 19 anthropoid species reveals left vs. right prefrontal hemispheres in relative white to grey matter and suggests a neural adaptive shift that distinguishes ape from monkey radiation.
Faculty The lead author, Dr. Jeroen Smaers is a: NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) Postdoctoral Fellow, University College London, Department of Anthropology
Student Charlene R. Case and Alexandra M. Cowper were junior Miami University students who participated in the Cambridge Junior Visiting Fellows in the Department of Biological Anthropology in 2010. Their contributions to this publication represent the research project requirement of this Cambridge program. Case and Cowper graduated from Miami; Case is now a Ph.D. student in psychology at Florida State University.
Funding University of Cambridge Junior Fellows Fund

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Stress response and virulence functions of the A. baumannii NfuA Fe-S scaffold protein
Citation J Bacteriol, 2012; 00213: Zimbler DL, Park TM, Arivett BA, Penwell WF, Greer SM, Woodruff TM, Tierney DL, Actis LA.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This report describes the role of a bacterial protein in intracellular metabolisms and responses of oxidative stress and iron limiting conditions. Some of these conditions are encountered by bacterial pathogens while interaction with the human host.
Faculty Luis A. Actis is Professor and chair, department of Microbiology
Student Thomas Park did his work as part of the URM (Undergraduate Research Mentoring) program and the University Honors program. He worked in the lab for 3 years between 2008 and 2011. He received his BS in Microbiology in 2011. Currently, he is a 1st-year student in the University of Cincinnati Medical School.
Funding This work was supported the NIH grant award “Study of iron acquisition in Acinetobacter baumannii.” R01 Grant 1R01AI070174, 2007 - 2012, $1,480,500.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Conserved terminal organelle morphology and function in Mycoplasma penetrans and Mycoplasma iowae
Citation J Bacteriol., 2012; 00060: 12:Jurkovic DA, Newman JT, Balish MF.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This report describes the adherent, motile, and ultrastructural properties of two mycoplasma species associated with disease in humans and animals. It extends the observation that different phylogenetic lineages within the genus Mycoplasma have independently evolved similar structures that function in adherence and motility.
Faculty Mitchell F. Balish is an Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology.
Student Jaime Newman, currently a junior, has done independent study in the laboratory since her sophomore year. Her contribution to this paper was done in the end of her sophomore year and the beginning of her junior year. She is still enrolled and doing independent study with me, focusing on genetic manipulation of mycoplasmas.
Funding This work was supported the NIH grant award “Gliding motility and cytadherence in Mycoplasma penetrans,” R15 Grant 1 R15 AI073994-01A1, 2008-2011, $206,700, and its renewal, 2 R15 AI073994-02, 2011-2014, $314,880.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title RubisCO lineages in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake during the polar night transition
Citation App Env Microbiol., 2012; 0: Kong W, Ream DC, Priscu JC & Morgan-Kiss RM.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This research characterized the response of phytoplankton populations residing in the dry valley Lake Bonney to the seasonal transition between Antarctic summer and polar winter. This study represented the first document the response of these organisms to the transition to polar night.
Faculty Rachael Morgan-Kiss is an Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology
Student Dave Ream worked in the Morgan-Kiss laboratory as an undergraduate researcher during the summer of 2009. He was trained by and worked closely with a postdoctoral fellow in my laboratory, Dr. Weidong Kong, constructing and screening many sequencing libraries for the paper. Mr. Ream is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Microbiology, Miami University.
Funding NSF

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Assaying carbon fixation potential in microbial eukaryote enrichment cultures isolated from a chemically stratified Antarctic lake
Citation J Visual Exp., 2012; 0: Dolhi JM, Ketchum N & Morgan-Kiss RM.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This report is a novel work that combines a methods paper with a descriptive video documenting the research. This work describes development of an enzyme assay to track carbon fixation activity in natural aquatic samples and the production of new enrichment cultures from the dry valley lakes. The development of this assay will help other researchers to track carbon fixation potential in aquatic environments. Moreover, there are few isolates from these extreme environments, and this work led to cultivation of >100 novel enrichment cultures which are now maintained in Dr. Morgan-Kiss’ low temperature cultivation facility at Miami University.
Faculty Rachael Morgan-Kiss is an Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology.
Student Nicholas Ketchum participated in this work during two field seasons in 2010 and 2011. Mr. Ketchum has participated in many other research projects in the Morgan-Kiss laboratory, including a research team that competed and won first place in Miami University Interdisciplinary Technology Challenge in 2008. He is currently a senior undergraduate in the Morgan-Kiss laboratory and is planning to start graduate school in Fall 2012.
Funding NSF grant award “CAREER:Protist Nutritional Strategies in Permanently Stratified Antarctic Lakes” CAREER Award ANT- 1056396, 2011-2016 - $658,822.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Stress Response and Virulence Functions of the A. baumannii NfuA Fe-S Scaffold Protein. J. Bacteriol
Citation J. Bacteriol, 2012; 0: Zimbler DL, Park TM, Arivett BA, Penwell WF, Greer SM, Woodruff TM, Tierney DL, Actis LA.. Miami University Oxford, Ohio
Description This work involved characterization of a bacterial pathogen’s electron transport machinery, as a potential target for new antimicrobial therapies. The wild-type bacterium and a strain in which one of the key components of the electron transport construction machinery was eliminated were stressed with carrying levels of soluble iron. Harvested proteins were examined for metal content by Ms. Woodruff (Junior; independent study), using inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties were examined by Mr. Greer (Junior; independent study). The results showed that this species of bacteria is unique in its ability to construct low levels of iron-sulfur containing proteins, in spite of the loss of this key piece of machinery.
Faculty Luis Actis is Chair & Professor of Microbiology.
Student Sam Greer and Tessa Woodruff are currently junior B. B. Chemistry majors. They have been performing independent study in the lab since their freshman year.
Funding This work was funded by NSF and NIH.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Characterizing the dual-wavelength dye indo-1 for calcium-ion sensing under pressure
Citation Anal. Methods., 2012; 4: 80-84, Ryan J, Urayama P.. Miami University Oxford, Ohio
Description Understanding the physico-chemical nature of high-pressure effects on probe dyes extends the range over which quantitative biochemical sensing is possible and informs the continued development of robust sensor probes. This study reports the high-pressure characterization of indo-1 for potential use in calcium-ion sensing under pressure.
Faculty Paul Urayama is an Associate Professor of Physics, and is affiliated with the Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology graduate program at Miami University.
Student Jordan Ryan, an engineering physics and biochemistry double major, started research his freshman year, completing this project as a junior. He was involved through the University’s Undergraduate Summer Scholars program and during the school year for independent study credit. Jordan is currently a medical student at the Indiana University School of Medicine.
Funding This research was supported by an award from the Research Corporation, Miami University’s College of Arts and Science, Committee on Faculty Research, Undergraduate Summer Scholars program, and National Science Foundation.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Chronic cold acclimation increases thermogenic capacity, non-shivering thermogenesis and muscle citrate synthase activity in both wild-type and brown adipose tissue deficient mice
Citation Comp. Biochem. Physiol., 2012; 161: 395-400, Mineo* PM, Cassell‡ EA, Roberts‡ ME, Schaeffer PJ.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This work looked at exercise in skeletal muscle in response to cold. We are interested in how muscle activity may play a role in resistance to obesity and diabetes and developed an approach for study using cold exposure and shivering.
Faculty Paul J. Schaeffer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Zoology.
Student This work took place from 2009-11. Emily Cassell is a current senior who will be attending medical school at University of Cincinnati this coming year. Maureen Roberts is currently a medical student at the University of Toledo.
Funding Study was supported by internal departmental funds.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Predator cues and an herbicide affect activity and emigration in an agrobiont wolf spider
Citation Chemosphere., 2012; 87: 390-396, Wrinn, K.M., Evans, S.C., Rypstra, A.L.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description Although glyphosate-based herbicides (e.g. Round-up) are not acutely toxic to arthropods, little is known regarding their effects on natural chemical communication pathways of the predators that are critical agents of biological control in agricultural systems. The wolf spider, Pardosa milvina, is abundant in agroecosystems where herbicides are regularly applied. This work reveals that herbicide alters Pardosa movement patterns and their reactions to other species in agroecosystems. Thus the colonization agroecosystems and the types of predators that are present at any given time are impacted by herbicide spraying.
Faculty Ann L. Rypstra is the Director of the Ecology Research Center and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Zoology.
Student Samuel Evans was a Miami undergraduate who collaborated with doctoral student, Kerri Wrinn during the summer of his sophomore and junior years (2008-9). This was just one of several projects that Sam executed during his four years of working with my research group. Sam started this work as an Undergraduate Summer Scholar and completed it the following summer. His primary work provided the background for this paper and for the dissertation of Kerri Wrinn. (see Evans, S.C., Shaw, E.M., Rypstra, A.L., 2010. Exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide affects agrobiont predatory arthropod behaviour and long-term survival. Ecotoxicology 19, 1249–1257.). Sam is completing his M.S. at the University of Akron and moving to Rice University in May.
Funding Funding support came from internal sources Undergraduate Summer Scholar Program as well as the Department of Zoology, the field workshop program and the Hamilton Campus of Miami University.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Solar radiation decreases parasitism in Daphnia
Citation Ecology Letters., 2012; 15: Overholt, E.P., Hall, S.R., Williamson, C.E., Meikle, C.K.*, Duffy, M.A. and Caceres, C.E.. Miami University Oxford Ohio
Description This article is significant because water transparency is decreasing in many lakes and rivers in the USA and other parts of the world, and it suggests that decreases in the penetration of light will reduce the natural disinfection abilities of sunlight not only for Daphnia parasites, but potentially human pathogens.
Faculty Craig Williamson is a Professor of Zoology and Ohio Eminent Scholar.
Student Claire Meikle has contributed substantially to this project, starting as a high-school student, and more recently as a freshman in Zoology at Miami. In addition to contributing to the experiments, she provided input to the writing of the manuscript. She continues her work in Craig Williamson's lab, exploring the interactions of UV and parasites, including the possibility that UV may have some beneficial effects for Daphnia, which is far less sensitive to UV than is the parasite.
Funding This project was funded through the Eminent Scholar fund and USS and undergraduate research awards.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title A modified and sensitive protein assay for dilute biological samples
Citation 2012; Heda R, Kunwar U, Robinson D, Heda GD. Mississippi University for Women
Description The present study was aimed to improve the sensitivity of protein assays. With this method protein concentration can be measured in nanogram range in dilute biological samples. This assay is quick, highly reproducible, cost-effective, and more importantly sensitive. This method will be useful in measuring the precise protein concentration in small biological samples prior to their biochemical analyses such as in comparative proteomics.
Faculty Ghanshyam Heda is an assistant professor of biology.
Student Rajiv is a high school senior at Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science and will be attending Rhodes College at Memphis, TN in Fall 2012. Upasana is a junior undergraduate student with biology major at Mississippi University for Women. Dominique is graduating with biology major from Mississippi University for Women in Spring 2012 and preparing for MCAT examination to pursue higher education in the field of medicine.
Funding This research work was supported by the Mississippi INBRE funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institute of Health.

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Recorded at: 7/12/2012
Title Ion and solute transport by prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles
Citation Journal of Insect Physiology, 2012; 58: 563-569, Hirata T, Czapar A, Brin L, Haritonova A, Bondeson D, Linser P, Cabrero P, Dow JAT, Romero MF. Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Description Prestin is the insect functional orthologue of Slc26a6. This paper reports the cloning, phylogeny and functional expression of the Drosophila and Anopheles (Diptera) prestins: Cl /ox2 exchange, Cl /SO42- exchange and Cl-/HCO3 exchange. The Diptera prestins and mouse Slc26a6 were documented to have similar transport properties, the Diptera proteins have enhanced Cl /SO42- exchange compared to mouse Slc26a6. The Diptera prestins are mainly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules (renal tubules). Drosophila OSR1 kinase signaling activates dPrestin transport function. Dipteran prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen, and may be a model of human kidney stones.
Faculty Michael F. Romero is an Associate Professor of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering & Nephrology and Hypertension.
Student Undergraduate Time of project Current position 1) Alyona Haritonova Summer project 2008 •BS Physics (St. Katherine’s, St. Pual , MN) •U MN-Twin Cities; PhD candidate (Biomedical Engineering -Ultrasound) 2) Lauren Brin Summer project 2009 •BS Chemistry (St. Katherine’s, St. Pual , MN) •2nd yr Medical student (Creighton Univ, NE) 3) Anna Czapar Summer project 2010 •Sr. , Univ IL (Biomedical Engineering) •MD-PhD program (Mayo or CWRU) in Fall 2012 4) Daniel P. Bondeson Summer project 2011, continue 1/12 •Sr. , Univ WI-Stevens Point (Chemistry) •Yale, Molecular Biochem. Biophysics, PhD program in Fall 2012 •Interest: structural drug design / medicinal chemistry
Funding a.Mayo Clinic Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURF) b.Mayo O’Brien Urology Research Center (P50-DK083007)

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title The Effects of Fire on Lycopodium digitatum strobili.
Citation Jeffersoniana., 2011; 27: 1-9, Vogel SI, Piatkowski BT, Dooley AC, Poli, DB.. Roanoke College
Description Lycopodium is a commonly ignored plant in the forest and in fire ecological studies in spite of the well-documented explosive nature of their spores. In order to understand how fire may affect Lycopodium, burn studies were carried out on varying sporophyte life stages. Strobili exhibited varying degrees of sporophyll opening and closing in response to the burning and age was directly correlated to the length of the burn. Spores that were burned and plated on axenic media showed a decrease in germination time, from 9 months to 3 weeks, after being subjected to fire. Beyond providing baseline understanding of the effects of Lycopodium and its reproduction, these studies also provide clues about the possible role of fire in Paleozoic forests.
Faculty Dorothy Belle Poli is an assistant professor of biology.
Student Stephanie Vogel (a junior) and Bryan Piatkowski (a senior) are current biology students. They participated in this research as a portion of their independent study credit.
Funding This research was supported by Roanoke College and the Virginia Museum of Natural History.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title The grooming behaviors of the Hawaiian river shrimp, Macrobrachium grandimanus
Citation J. Crust. Biol., 2011; 31: 4:617-622, Van Maurik, LN, Wortham, JL.. University of Tampa
Description This species has a dense aggregation of setae located on the major second cheliped and the function of this is unknown but hypothesized to be utilized in grooming activities. The grooming behaviors were documented and the results indicate that this species has grooming behaviors that are similar when compared to other Caridean shrimps. A time budget for grooming was found to be 24.7%, which suggests approximately six hours per day is dedicated to grooming. Multiple statistical analyses indicate the setal patch is not associated with grooming either as a grooming appendage, or a groomed body region. Ideas for possible functions of the setal patch are presented.
Faculty Jen Wortham is an assoicate professor in the College of Natural and Health Sciences.
Student Lauren participated in this research as a junior and a senior for independent study credits as well as for senior undergraduate research thesis credit. She is currently in the master’s program at the University of South Florida in biology.
Funding The research was supported by The University of Tampa Biology Department, UT Dana Foundation Grant, and the College of Natural and Health Sciences.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title β-Amylase–like proteins function as transcription factors in Arabidopsis, controlling shoot growth and development.
Citation Plant Cell., 2011; 23: 4:1391-1403, Reinhold H, Soyk S, Šimková K, Hostettler C, Marafino J, Mainiero S, Vaughan CK, Monroe JD, and Zeeman SC.. James Madison University, and ETH Zurich
Description The authors describe two novel β-amylases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana that are located in nuclei and function as transcription factors. The DNA-binding domain within these proteins binds to DNA sequences found in genes regulated by the growth hormone brassinosteroid revealing how hormones and carbohydrate status may coordinately control a plant’s growth. β-amylases were thought to only function in plastidic starch degradation so this discovery was unexpected and opens an entirely new avenue of research on the regulation of plant growth.
Faculty Jonathan Monroe is a professor of biology at James Madison University.
Student During his junior and senior years, John Marafino used transgenic plants expressing GFP-tagged β-amylases to make the discovery that these proteins were located in nuclei. Samantha Mainiero’s honors thesis included using site-directed mutagenesis to define the nuclear localization signal in one of the β-amylases. John is currently applying to graduate programs and Samantha is a first-year doctoral student in plant biology at Cornell University.
Funding Both students received academic credit for their work. The Jeffress Memorial Trust supported the research.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Synthetic adjuvants for vaccine formulations: Evaluation of new phytol derivatives in induction and persistence of specific immune response
Citation Cell Immunol., 2011; 271: 2:308-318, Aachouia Y, Schulte ML, Fitch, RW, Ghosh, SK.. Indiana State University
Description Our study focuses on an important area of research as it helps develop effective vaccines. Vaccines provide very cost-effective means to prevent and eradicate infections and other diseases. Adjuvants serve as immunostimulants and are constituents of vaccine formulations. Alum is the most widely used human-licensed adjuvant, but it has many side effects. To increase vaccine efficacy we study phytol derived from a green plant pigment chlorophyll.. To develop safe adjuvants we modify phytol and prepare various derivatives. Then we study their effects on the immune system.
Faculty Richard W. Fitch is Associate Professor of Chemistry. Swapan K. Ghon is Professor of Biology
Student Michael Schulte started working on this project summer of 2006. He was supported on grant monies during Fall 2008. He graduated with a BS in Chemisty in 2008.
Funding The research was supported in part by Fraternal Order of Eagles, Indiana Academy of Sciences and, the Indiana State University Research Committee.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title A new family of leafy liverworts from the middle Eocene of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Citation Am J Bot., 2011; 98: 6:998-1006, Steenbock CM, Stockey RA, Beard G, Tomescu AMF.. Humboldt State University
Description The study examined anatomically preserved plant fossils from the middle Eocene Oyster Bay Formation of Vencouver Island. The fossils exhibit a novel combination of characters unknown among extinct and extant liverworts: (1) three ranked helical phyllotaxis with underleaves larger than the lateral leaves; (2) fascicled rhizoids associated with the leaves of all three ranks; (3) Anomoclada -type endogenous branching. A new liverwort family, Appianacae, is established based upon the novel combination of characters. Its type genus, Appiana, broadens the known diversity of bryophytes and adds a liverwort component to one of the richest and best characterized Eocene floras.
Faculty Alexandru Tomescu is an associate professor of Botany
Student Christopher undertook the study as an independent study project while he was a sophomore in the Botany program at Humboldt State University. He is currently close to graduating with a double major in Botany and Ecology, and looking forward to graduate studies to continue a career in research and teaching.
Funding The research was supported by the Department of Biological Sciences at Humboldt State University.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Microconchid encrusters colonizing land plants: the earliest North American record from the Early Devonian of Wyoming, USA
Citation Lethaia., 2012; 45: Caruso JA, Tomescu AMF.. Humboldt State University
Description The study examined plant fossils in the Early Devonian Beartooth Butte Formation of Wyoming to document colonization by microconchid encrusters. Microconchids (lophophorates assigned to Class Tentaculita) were found on several plant species, at two fossil localities in the formation. Colonization by microconchids has implications for both the life history of the plants (indicating that some were living partially submerged at least periodically) and microconchid ecology (indicating that microconchids were colonizing freshwater habitats by the Early Devonian). The Beartooth Butte Formation provides the first record of plant colonization by microconchids in North America and, along with only one other Early Devonian record from Germany, the oldest evidence for microconchids colonizing plant substrates.
Faculty Alexandru Tomescu is an associate professor of botany.
Student Joey undertook the study as an independent project while he was a senior in the Geology program at Humboldt State University.
Funding The research was supported by grants from the Humboldt State University Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Foundation, and the American Philosophical Society, awarded to Alexandru Tomescu.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Co-exposure to nickel and cobalt chloride enhances cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells
Citation Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 2012; 258: Patel E, Lynch C, Ruff V, Reynolds M.. Washington College
Description In this study, we investigated the effect of exposure of H460 human lung epithelial cells to nickel and cobalt, both alone and in combination. We demonstrated that cells exposed simultaneously to cobalt and nickel exhibit a dose-dependent decrease in survival compared to the cells exposed to a single metal. The decrease in survival was the result of enhanced caspase activation and cleavage of PARP. Co-exposure increased the production of ROS and the formation of DSB.
Faculty Mindy Reynolds is an assistant professor of Biology
Student Eshan Patel '13 is a dual major in biology and psychology. He contributed to this project during the summer of 2011.Christine Lynch '11 is currently a research assistant at the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Military Performance Division, Natick, MA. He contributed to this project during the summers of 2009 and 2010.Victoria Ruff '14 is a psychology major at Washington College. She contributed to this project during the summer of 2011.
Funding This project was supported by the Hodson Trust and Middendorf Foundation at Washington College

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Variation in cricket acoustic mate attraction signaling explained by body morphology and metabolic differences
Citation Anim. Behav., 2011; 82: 1255-1261, Bertram SM, Thomson IR, Auguste B, Dawson JW, Darveau C-A.. Carleton University and the University of Ottawa
Description To address the proximate causes underlying variation in male cricket signaling effort, we quantified the morphological, physiological, and biochemical variation among male European house crickets (Acheta domesticus) and assessed whether it correlated with variation in male acoustic mate attraction signalling. Surprisingly, variation in acoustic signaling did not appear to be influenced by lipid metabolism. Instead, some of the variation in acoustic signaling was driven by differences in overall body size and differences in the activity of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase. These correlations suggest that the capacity for carbohydrate catabolism is important to male cricket acoustic signalling.
Faculty Sue Bertram and Jeff Dawson are associate professors at Carleton University, and Charles Darveau is an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa
Student Ian and Bourne undertook this research as NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Assistants. Bourne is currently studying medicine at McMaster University, while Ian is currently pursuing an MSc at Carleton University.
Funding The research was supported by NSERC discovery grants awarded to Sue, Charles, and Jeff and for NSERC USRA grants to Ian Thomson and Bourne Auguste.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Using Microsatellites to Understand the Physical Distribution of Recombination on Soybean Chromosomes
Citation PLoS ONE, 2011; 6: 7:Ott A, Trautschold B, Sandhu D.. University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point
Description The present study compared the genetic and physical maps of soybean chromosomes to examine the distribution of markers, genes and recombination. Marker and gene density showed the highest correlation with distance from the centromeres, while recombination showed a similar pattern with a much lower correlation. This information will be useful for future gene characterization and cloning.
Faculty Devinder Sandhu is an associate professor of biology and an adjunct professor of soil and waste resources.
Student Alina is currently enrolled in a doctoral program in genetics at Iowa State University.
Funding The project is supported by University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point Letters and Science undergraduate education initiative.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Extracellular nucleotides and apyrases regulate stomatal aperture in Arabidopsis.
Citation Plant Physiol., 2011; 156: 4:1740–1753, Clark G, Fraley D, Steinebrunner I, Cervantes A, Onyirimba, J, Liu A, Torres T, Tang W, Kim J, Roux SJ.. The University of Texas at Austin
Description The present study examined the effects of extracellular nucleotides on stomatal aperture in Arabidopsis leaves. A dose-response curve showed that poorly hydrolysable nucleotides, ATPγS and ADPβS, could either induce stomatal opening (at 5-15 µM) or induce closure (at ≥ 200 µM). Correspondingly, it was found that both light-induced stomatal opening and ABA-induced closing were preceded by increases in extracellular ATP levels. These results indicate that extracellular nucleotides play an important role in regulating stomatal opening and closing.
Faculty Stanley Roux is a professor of Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology. Gregory Clark is a Research Educator for the Freshman Research Initiative.
Student James Onyirimba started research through the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI) program. Before participating in this research, James and 11 other FRI undergraduates co-authored an article published in Plant Molecular Biology based on their FRI research on root hair growth. James represented the University of Texas at Austin at the 2009 World Science Forum in Budapest and is currently a second year student in Medical School. Andrew Cervantes was also an undergraduate participant in this research and recently graduated with a Plant Biology and English degree. Angela Liu conducted this research as a high school student and is currently in her first year as an undergraduate at Yale. The research was carried out from June 2009–May 2011.
Funding This research was made possible, in part, by the Freshman Research Initiative, a college-wide program funded by the National Science Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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Title Tropisetron increases the inhibitory effect of mild restraint on lordosis behavior of hormonally primed, ovariectomized rats.
Citation Behav Br Res., 2011; 219: 2:221-226, Uphouse L, Heckard D, Hiegel C, Guptarak J, Maswood S.. Texas Woman’s University
Description Ovariectomized, hormonally primed Fischer rats were treated intraperitoneally or intracranially with the 5-HT3 receptor, antagonist,3-tropanylindole-3-carboxylate hydrochloride (tropisetron), prior to a 5 min restraint stress. Intracranial (but not intraperitoneal) treatment amplified the effect of the stress on female rat sexual behavior. These findings are consistent with a role for the serotonergic system in both female rat sexual behavior and in the response to mild stress.
Faculty Dr. Lynda Uphouse is a professor in the Department of Biology.
Student Danyeal Heckard is a graduate student at Meharry Medical College.
Funding This research was supported by NIH HD28419, NIH GM55380, and by TWU institutional research support grant.

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Title Bacterial Hash Function Using DNA-Based XOR Logic Reveals Unexpected Behavior of the LuxR Promoter
Citation Interdisciplinary Bio Central., 2011; 3: 1-8, Pearson B, Lau KH, Allen A, Barron J, Cool R, Davis K, DeLoache W, Feeney E, Gordon A, Igo J, Lewis A, Muscalino K, Parra M, Penumetcha P, Rinker VG, Roland K, Zhu X, Poet JL, Eckdahl TT, Heyer LJ, Campbell AM.. Davidson College and Missouri Western State University
Description This bio-math, interdisciplinary paper in synthetic biology describes a DNA-based XOR gate designed to function in a cryptographic hash function. The XOR gate did not function as expected, but we documented a new behavior for the well characterized promoter for the lux operon. The lux promoter initiates transcription in the forward and reverse directions. This knowledge will help other synthetic biologists since the promoter is widely used by these bioengineers.
Faculty Campbell is a Professor of Biology at Davidson College.
Student Pearson is conducting biomedical research and while applying to PA school. Lau is a PhD graduate student at Purdue University. Allen is expected to graduate spring 2012. Barron attends dental school in Georgia. Cool is employed in Biotech industry. Davis is applying to MPH schools. DeLoache is PhD student at UC Berkeley. Feeney is working at NIH. Gordon is in medical school. Igo is pursuing a math degree. Lewis is a high school math teacher. Muscalino is a graduate student studying mathematics. Parra works for a software company. Penumetcha is a Fulbright Fellow in Botswana. Rinker is a senior in high school at Woodlawn School. Roland is a graduate student at NC State University. Zhu is applying to medical school.
Funding NSF UBM 0733952 to Davidson and 0733955 to MWSU, HHMI 52005120, 52006292 to Davidson, the James G. Martin Genomics Program at Davidson, and the MWSU Foundation and Summer Research Institute.

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Title Defining the Role of Syndecan-4 in Mechanotransduction using Surface-Modification Approaches
Citation PNAS USA., 2009; 106: 22102-22107, Bellin RM, Kubicek JD, Frigault MJ, Kamien AJ, Steward RL, Barnes HM, Digiacomo MB, Duncan LJ, Edgerly CK, Morse EM, Park CY, Fredberg JJ, Cheng CM, LeDuc P.. College of the Holy Cross
Description This study examined the role that syndecan-4 proteins play in the establishment of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast cells using biomechanical engineering and biochemical approaches. It was determined that syndecan-4 can both initiate focal adhesion formation on its own and serve as a conduit of mechanical strain.
Faculty Robert Bellin is an associate professor of biology. James Kubicek, Robert Steward, Chan Park, Jeffrey Fredberg, Chao-Min Cheng and Phil LeDuc are research collaborators at other institutions (Harvard School of Public Health or Carnegie Mellon University).
Student Matthew Frigault, Andrew Kamien, Hillary Barnes, Michael DiGiacomo, Luke Duncan, Christina Edgerly and Elizabeth Morse, all of which were Holy Cross biology or chemistry majors, each participated in this overall project, over the scale of five years, for senior research credit. Matthew, Andrew, Hillary, Michael, Luke and Christina are all currently in medical school. Elizabeth is in her second year of graduate school at Yale.
Funding This research was supported by the Holy Cross Summer Student Research Program, The Holy Cross Biology Department, and a Major Research Instrumentation Award from the National Science Foundation.

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Title Documenting Discoveries of Diversity
Citation Int J Syst Evol Microbiol., 2011; 61: 2162-2166, Strahan BL, Failor KC, Batties AM, Hayes PS, Cicconi KM, Mason CT, Newman JD.. Lycoming College
Description This article describes the characterization of a novel bacterial species that was discovered during the unknown microbe characterization lab activity in a general Microbiology course. After the initial screen in the Microbiology course suggested that it may be novel, several students studied this organism and its closest relatives to identify phenotypic and genotypic differences. This study included two datasets not previously examined in this genus, comparison of gyrB sequences, and Biolog GenIII metabolic profiles.
Faculty Jeff Newman is an Associate Professor of Biology.
Student Chris Mason, employed by AECOM Technical Services, identified the organism during the Microbiology course. Patrick Hayes, employed by the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, NYU & Kellie Cicconi, pursuing a Ph.D. at the Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences at Cornell University, completed the rRNA sequence analysis during the Research Methods course. Brittane Strahan performed API and Flavobacteriaceae tests during an ASM Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, obtained an RN degree from Thomas Jefferson University and works at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, PA. Allison Batties, pursuing a Ph.D. in Molecular Medicine at the University of Virginia analyzed reference strains and prepared culture collection deposits. KC Failor, employed by Analytical Lab Services, anayzed gyrB sequences during an ASM SURF.
Funding Research supported by NSF Award DBI-0960114: MRI-R2: Acquisition of Instrumentation for Novel Microbe Characterization by Undergraduate Researchers. KC Failor and Brittane Strahan were supported by ASM Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships.

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Title Bordetella avium causes induction of apoptosis and nitric oxide synthase in turkey tracheal explant cultures
Citation Microbes Infect., 2011; 13: 871-879, Miyamoto DM, Ruff K, Beach NM, Stockwell SB, Dorsey-Oresto A, Masters I, Temple LM.. James Madison University and Drew University
Description This long-term study describes a unique primary tissue culture model for studying pathogenesis of a bacterium that infects turkeys. It was found that exposure of the cultures to the bacterium (whole and fractionated) causes severe tissue damage. The model should allow us to identify the disease causing toxins in Bordetella avium.
Faculty Louise Temple is a professor in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology. Stephanie Stockwell is an assistant professor in the same department. David Miyamoto is a professor in the biology department at Drew University.
Student Angella Dorsey-Oresto began this study in 2002 at Drew University. She is a recent PhD graduate from UMDNJ. Isaac Masters has worked on the project over the last two years; he is a senior at James Madison University, applying for graduate programs.
Funding The research was supported by NIH AREA grants to Drs. Temple and Miyamoto.

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Title Yeast Bax Inhibitor, Bxi1p, Is an ER-localized Protein that Links the Unfolded Protein Response and Programmed Cell Death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Citation 2011; PLoS ONE 6(6): e20882. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0020882, Cebulski J, Malouin J, Pinches N, Cascio V, Austriaco N.. Providence College
Description In this study, we showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein encoded by the open reading frame, YNL305C, which we have renamed BXI1, is a bona fide homolog for mammalian Bax Inhibitor-1, an anti-apoptotic gene whose expression is upregulated in a wide range of human cancers. Our data suggests that this ER-localized protein links the unfolded protein response and programmed cell death in yeast.
Faculty Nicanor Austriaco, O.P., is an associate professor of biology and an instructor of theology at Providence College.
Student James Cebulski, Joshua Malouin, Nathan Pinches and Vincent Cascio undertook this work for credit and as research interns. James is seeking a job as a research technician before applying for a PhD program in biology. Joshua is a veterinary student at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. Nathan is a research technician at the TIMI Study Group at the Brigham & Woman’s Hospital in Boston. Vincent is a current senior at Providence College who is applying to medical school.
Funding Our laboratory is supported by the following grants: NIGMS R15 GM094712; NSF MRI-R2 0959354; a CAFR grant from Providence College, and NIH Grant 2 P20 RR016457 to the RI-INBRE Program.

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Title Microtubule-Associated Proteins MAP65-1 and MAP65-2 Positively Regulate Axial Cell Growth in Etiolated Arabidopsis Hypocotyls
Citation The Plant Cell., 2011; 23: 1889-1903, Lucas JR, Courtney S, Hassfurder M, Dhingra S, Bryant A, Shaw SL.. Indiana University, Bloomington
Description This study examined the role of two microtubule associated proteins in plant growth. We found that these two proteins drastically affect axial cell elongation without dramatically disrupting the microtubule cytoskeleton.
Faculty Jessica Lucas is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Indiana University in the Biology department in the laboratory of Assistant Professor Sidney Shaw.
Student Stephanie Courtney was a sophomore biology major at the time of this study. Stephanie is in the process of applying for graduate schools. Sonia Dhingra, a pre-dental student, was a sophomore when she completed the research presented in this paper. Sonia will attend dental school after graduation. Adam Bryant was a senior when he worked on this project and he is currently enrolled in Medical School at the University of Illinois.
Funding Funding for this work was provided by a National Science Foundation award to Sidney Shaw.

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Title Mechanisms responsible for progesterone’s protection against lordosis-inhibiting effects of restraint II. Role of progesterone metabolites.
Citation Horm Behav., 2011; 60: 226-232, Miryala CSJ, Hassell J, Adams S, Hiegel C, Uzor N, Uphouse L.. Texas Woman’s University
Description The role of progesterone metabolites in progesterone’s ability to reduce effects of mild restraint on sexual behavior was examined in hormonally primed, ovariectomized Fischer rats. An inhibitor of progesterone metabolism, finasteride, failed to reduce the effects of progesterone. However, the progesterone metabolite, allopregnanolone, was as effective as progesterone in preventing effects of restraint; and allopregnanolone’s protection was not blocked by indomethacin which prevents allopregnanolone’s metabolism to dihydroprogesterone. These findings led to the suggestion that progesterone receptors were involved in the hormone’s protection against mild restraint and that progesterone metabolites may be able to activate the receptor by a ligand-independent mechanism.
Faculty Dr. Lynda Uphouse is a professor in the Department of Biology.
Student Chandra Suma is a graduate student who is working on her dissertation. James Hassell initiated the work during his tenure as a MBRS Scholar at TWU (NIH GM55380) and later worked as an undergraduate research assistant (NIH HD28419). He is beginning his first year as a graduate student at the University of South Dakota. Sarah Adams began the project as a student research assistant (NIH HD28419) and is completing her undergraduate degree at Texas Woman’s University. She is in the process of applying to graduate school. Ndidi Uzor worked on the project as a MBRS Scholar at TWU (NIH GM55380) during her senior year at TWU and is now employed in California.
Funding This research was supported by NIH HD28419, NIH GM55380, and by TWU institutional research support to Lynda Uphouse.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Mechanisms responsible for progesterone’s protection against lordosis-inhibiting effects of restraint I. Role of progesterone receptors
Citation Horm Behav., 2011; 60: 219-225, Hassell J, Miryala CSJ, Hiegel C, Uphouse L.. Texas Woman’s University
Description Ovariectomized, Fischer rats, hormonally primed with estradiol benzoate, were injected with progesterone 4 h, 1 h, or 30 min before restraint. Progesterone protected against effects of restraint when administered 4 hr, but not 30 min, before the stressor. The nonmetabolizable progestin, medroxyprogesterone, mimicked the effects of progesterone and a progesterone receptor antagonist, RU486, attenuated progesterone’s protection. These findings were consistent with a role for intracellular progesterone receptors in progesterone’s protection against sexual behavioral effects of mild stress.
Faculty Dr. Lynda Uphouse is a professor in the Department of Biology.
Student James initiated the work during his tenure as a MBRS Scholar at TWU (NIH GM55380) and later worked as an undergraduate research assistant (NIH HD28419). James is beginning his first year as a graduate student at the University of South Dakota. Chandra Suma is a graduate student who is working on her dissertation.
Funding This research was supported by NIH HD28419, NIH GM55380, and by TWU institutional research support to Lynda Uphouse.

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Title Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models.
Citation J. Biomed. Opt., 2011; 16: 4:Close DM, Hahn RE, Patterson SS, Baek SJ, Ripp SA, Sayler GS.. University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Description In this study, the recently described human-optimized bacterial bioluminescence cassette (holux) was compared and contrasted with the popular firefly luciferase (Luc) bioluminescent and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent reporter systems in both cell culture and small animal imaging conditions. Experimentally relevant acquisition times, injection volumes, and minimum detectable cellular population sizes were determined, as well as differences in the dynamics of light production kinetics for each system. It was determined that at and above average cell populations sizes, the holux system compared favorably with both the Luc and GFP imaging systems under cell culture and near surface (subcutaneous) small animal imaging conditions.
Faculty Dr. Dan Close is a postdoctoral research associate with the Joint Institute for Biological Sciences, Dr. Stacey Patterson and Dr. Steven Ripp are both senior level researchers in the laboratory of Dr. Gary Sayler. Dr. Seung Baek is an associate professor in the department of pathobiology in the college of veterinary medicine.
Student Ruth Hahn, a sophomore undergraduate, participated in this research during a summer internship in the laboratory. Ruth is currently attending Trinity University in Texas and majoring in Engineering Sciences.
Funding This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, the National Science Foundation, and the Army Defense University Research Instrumentation Program.

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Title ABO discrepancy and hemolytic anemia post liver transplant due to Passenger Lymphocyte Syndrome.
Citation LabMedicine, 2011; 42: 1:137-139, DeLuna MM and Behan KJ.. University of West Florida
Description This paper presents an unusual case of a patient who received a liver transplant to cure a chronic liver disease, and experienced a severe graft versus host condition leading to life threatening anemia. The case is intended for professionals in transplant and transfusion medicine, as it discusses subtleties in organ compatibility between a donor and a recipient.
Faculty Kristina Behan is an Associate Professor and Director of the Clinical Laboratory Sciences Program.
Student Mark De Luna is a Clinical Laboratory Sciences (Department of Biology) graduate who presented the case as his senior capstone case study in 2010.
Funding Not applicable.

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Title Role for topoisomerase 1 in transcription-associated mutagenesis in yeast
Citation Proc Natl Acad Sci USA., 2011; 108: 2:698-703, Lippert MJ, Kim N, Cho J-E, Larson RP, Schoenly NE, O’Shea SH, Jinks-Robertson S.. Saint Michael's College and Duke University Medical Center
Description Previously we showed that high levels of transcription through a yeast gene stimulated 2-nucleotide deletions, thereby identifying a unique signature for transcription-associated mutation (TAM) in yeast. The present study demonstrated that TAM deletions occur at hotspots and require topoisomerase 1 (Top1), the main enzyme responsible for dealing with transcription-related supercoiling. These data implicate Top1 in spontaneous mutagenesis at highly transcribed genes.
Faculty Malcolm Lippert is an associate professor of biology at Saint Michael’s College. Nayun Kim, Jang-Eun Cho, Shannon O’Shea, and Sue Jinks-Robertson are collaborators at Duke University.
Student Ryan Larson and Nathan Schoenly, both biology majors, performed summer research projects at Saint Michael’s College. Ryan and Nate received Undergraduate Summer Research Fellowships from the Vermont Genetics Network and the American Society for Microbiology, respectively. Ryan is currently a pre-doctoral student in the Department of Immunology at the University of Washington, Seattle. Nate attends the University of Buffalo School of Dental Medicine.
Funding Work in the Lippert and Jinks-Robertson laboratories was supported by NIH Grants R15 GM079778 and RO1 GM038464, respectively.

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Title Cold Temperature Effects on Byssal Thread Production by the Native Mussel Geukensia demissa versus the Non-Native Mussel Mytella charruana
Citation UCF URJ, 2011; 5: 1:Brodsky, S.. University of Central Florida
Description This research project examined the survival limits of an introduced mussel species, Mytella charruana, by observing effects of temperature on its byssal thread production. Byssal threads are produced by mussels to help attach to surfaces in the water column, which has been shown to be crucial to their survival. A native mussel species, Geukensia demissa, was also tested to examine the possibility of competition with M. charruana. This study will help us predict further distribution and survival of M. charruana in its introduced area.
Faculty Dr. Linda Walters- Biology Department Dr. Eric Hoffman- Biology Department Dr. Kimberly Schneider- Biology Department/Office of Undergraduate Research Director
Student This project was completed through an independent research project in 2009, with which funding was obtained through an Office of Undergraduate Research Student Research Grant. Sasha is currently employed full time in the education department at an accredited zoo.
Funding Office of Undergraduate Research Student Research Grant, funding for previous research through Research and Mentoring Program

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Field testing of collection cards for Cannabis sativa samples with a single hexanucleotide DNA marker.
Citation Journal of Forensic Sciences., 2011; 56: 1-5, Allgeier L, Hemenway J, Shirley N, LaNier T, Miller Coyle H.. University of New Haven
Description The present study examined the feasibility of using collection cards for Cannabis drug evidence by law enforcement agents for fresh, dried and hashish samples. DNA results with a highly specific marijuana short tandem repeat (STR) marker were generated for all but the hashish samples. The collection cards are an easily implementable plant DNA archival system for genotyping and databasing of Cannabis and other plant species with a wide range of scientific applications.
Faculty Heather Miller Coyle is an associate professor of forensic science. Tommy LaNier is the director of the National Marijuana Initiative. Lindsay Allgeier is currently employed at the Massachusetts State Police Laboratory.
Student Nick Shirley is an undergraduate forensic science major with a biology concentration as well as a resident assistant at University of New Haven. John Hemenway is a recent graduate with a B.S. in forensic science from University of New Haven.
Funding

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Impact of malarial infection on metabolism and thermoregulation in the fence lizard Sceloporus occidentalis from Oregon
Citation J. Herp., 2010; 44: 4:634-640, Scholnick DA, Manivanh RV, Savenkova, OD, Bates TG, McAlexander SL.. Pacific University
Description We report the presence of the malaria parasite in three populations of Oregon fence lizards. Malarial infections diminished the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood by as much as 25% resulting in increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism during activity and elevated costs of recovery. Malarial infections induced a graded fever response during recovery from moderate activity signifying thermoregulation disruptions due to malaria-induced anemia.
Faculty David Scholnick is an associate professor of biology.
Student Richard Manivanh, Olesya Savenkova, Tony Bates and Shana McAlexander were Biology majors at Pacific University and participated in the project as summer research students. Richard is currently a laboratory technician at Stanford University, Olesya is a second year optometry student at Pacific’s College of Optometry, Tony is a medical student at University of Queensland, and Shana was recently hired as an Educational Product Developer for Carolina Biological Company.
Funding The research was supported by a Research Program for Life Science Grant to D. Scholnick from the MJ Murdock Charitable Trust.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title NF-kB down-regulates expression of the B-lymphoma marker CD10 through a miR-155/PU.1 pathway
Citation J Biol Chem., 2011; 286: 1675-1681, Thompson RC, Herscovitch M, Zhao I, Ford TJ, Gilmore TD.. Boston University
Description Using molecular and cellular approaches, this paper describes for the first time a molecular pathway by which expresson of CD10 is regulated in certian B-lymphoma cells. Namely, it shows that transcription factor NF-kB activates expression of micro-RNA miR-155, which then downregulates expression of transcription factor PU.1 and consequenctly its target gene CD10.
Faculty Dr Thomas D Gilmore is a Professor of Biology and is Director of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) at Boston University.
Student Tyler Ford took part in this research during his junior and senior years (2009-10). This research was also part of his work for Distinction in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. Tyler is currently in a PhD program in Biomedicine at Harvard University.
Funding This research was supported by an NIH grant (to TD Gilmore), and Tyler Ford was supported by the Beckman Scholars Program awarded to Boston University.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Do Botanophila flies provide reproductive isolation between two species of Epichloë fungi? A field test.
Citation New Phytologist, 2011; 190: 206-212, Bultman TL, Leuchtmann A, Sullivan TJ, Dreyer A.. Hope College and ETH-Zurich
Description Botanophila flies visit fruiting structures of Epichloë fungi for egg laying. Flies transfer fungal gametes among stromata and thereby serve to cross fertilize fungi. We investigated if the flies play a role in the reproductive isolation of two Epichloë species at a field site in southwestern Switzerland. Most ascospores collected from both fungal species indicated intraspecific mating, yet 9.3% of fungal fruiting bodies contained spores of hybrid origin, suggesting post-zygotic isolating mechanisms are an important means of reproductive isolation. We also found preferences by Botanophila flies for particular fungal species that should influence reproductive isolation between the fungi.
Faculty Tom Bultman (professor of biology) and T.J. Sullivan (post-doctoral associate) are members of the Biology Department at Hope College; Adrian Leuchtmann is a faculty member of the Institute of Integrative Biology at ETH in Zurich, Switzerland.
Student Austin Dreyer conducted the work in Switzerland as a senior biology major. He is currently in a Ph.D. program in biology at Michigan State University.
Funding The research was supported by NSF-CRUI (DBI-03300840) award to TLB.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Rudimentary Pedal Grasping in Mice and Implications for Terminal Branch Arboreal Quadrupedalism
Citation J Morph., 2011; 272: 230-240, Byron C, Kunz H, Matuszek H, Lewis S, VanValkinburgh D.. Mercer University, College of Liberal Arts, Department of Biology
Description The present study examined skeletal morphology of mice trained for living and climbing among thin branches that simulate a terminal branch arboreal niche. Climb-trained mice exhibited significant morphological differences compared to controls specifically within hindlimb regions of the proximal thigh, ankle, and tail. Notably, climbing mice learned to be agile among branches by coordinating tail use with pedal grasping. The morphological changes from these anatomical regions suggest that phenotypic plasticity within the mouse body is sufficient for a non-specialist climber to acclimate to this novel ecological niche. These findings suggest that the pedal grasp traditionally associated with early events in primate evolution are not necessarily restricted to this clade and could have been a component of the Euarchontogliran bauplan.
Faculty This work was carried out in the Department of Biology, College of Liberal Arts, Mercer University.
Student Hawley Kunz was a seniorand participated as a summer researcher in the Mercer MUBS program. Hawley is currently in a Biomedical Science PhD program in Houston, TX.Heather Matuszek was a senior when this work was carried out. Heather is currently applying to health science professional schools.Stephanie Lewis was a senior when this work was carried out. Stephanie is currently in her second year at Mercer University School of Medicine.Daniel VanValkinburgh was a sophomore when this work was carried out. He is currently preparing for his senior year where he will explore medical school and/or PhD training opportunities.
Funding Funding for this work was attained from the Mercer University Biomedical Scholars Research Program. Also, money from the Department of Biology has kept this project running.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Interactions between La Crosse Virus and bacteria isolated from the digestive tract of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)
Citation J Med Entomol., 2011; 48: 2:389-394, Joyce JD, Nogueira JR, Bales AA, Pittman KE, Anderson JR.. Radford University
Description This study identified 24 bacteria from the digestive tract of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes and tested for direct antiviral activity against La Crosse virus, an important cause of pediatric encephalitis in the eastern United States. Twelve of the bacteria significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus in cell culture assays. This is the first demonstration of such an effect in a mosquito-virus system, and could provide the means to develop a novel control mechanism against this and other mosquito-borne viruses.
Faculty Justin Anderson is an assistant professor of biology.
Student Jonathan Joyce worked on this project from Spring 2008 to spring 2009 and is now employed at a biotechnology firm in Blacksburg, VA. Jonathan Nogueira worked on this project during the summer of 2009 and is now a medical student at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, VA. Amber Bales worked on this project from fall 2008 to spring 2009; she is now in the physician assistant program at Jefferson College of Health Sciences in Roanoke, VA. Katie Pittman worked on this project during fall 2008 and is currently employed as an EPA contractor.
Funding This project was supported by a Radford University Seed Grant.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title The amphipod Gammarus minus has larger eyes in freshwater springs with numerous fish predators.
Citation Invert Biol., 2011; 130: 1:60-67, Glazier DS, Deptola TJ.. Juniata College
Description For the first time we report that intraspecific variation in eye size may be associated with the presence of visual predators, with individuals having larger eyes occurring in habitats with more predators. Our observations are based on allometric comparisons of eye size among five populations of the amphipod crustacean Gammarus minus that inhabit freshwater springs with and without fish predators.
Faculty Douglas Glazier is a professor of biology.
Student Travis Deptola, a biology/geology major, undertook this work during 2007 as a von Liebig Summer Research Fellow. Travis is currently a graduate student in the Geosciences Department at the Pennsylvania State University.
Funding This research was supported by von Liebig (Juniata College) summer fellowships awarded to both authors.

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Title Sulforaphane inhibits de novo synthesis of IL-8 and MCP-1 in human epithelial cells generated by cigarette smoke extract
Citation J. Immunotoxicology, 2011; 0: 0:1-9, Starrett, W, Blake, DJ.. Fort Lewis College
Description The present study examined the effects of sulforaphane, a compound derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, to increase antioxidant gene expression in order to inhibit pro-inflammatory chemokine production due to cigarette smoke. The study demonstrated that in human epithelial cells sulforaphane was able to increase antioxidant expression and significantly inhibit the production of interluekin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protien-1 (MCP-1) as a result of cigarette smoke.
Faculty Dr. David Blake is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Fort Lewis College.
Student Warren Starrett is an undergraduate biology major at Fort Lewis College and assisted with the research project during the summer of 2010 for independent study credit. Warren will apply to nursing school at the end of the academic year.
Funding The research was supported by Fort Lewis College through a Faculty Development Grant awarded to Dr. David Blake.

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Title Reproductive behavior in horseshoe crabs: does density matter?
Citation Cur Zool., 2010; 56: 5:634-642, Mattei JH, Beekey MA, Rudmann A, Woronik A.. Sacred Heart University (CT)
Description Through a long term behavioral study, we found that variation in mating behavior is influenced by population density in Limulus polyphemus. Our study population on two beaches in Connecticut have a spawning density 400 times less than that found in Delaware Bay (0.002 females/m2 vs. 0.8 females/m2) but similar operational sex ratios. Between 90%–95% of all spawning females in CT were paired with only one male, thus exhibiting monogamous behavior. We also observed that on average 18% of the females on the spawning beaches are single. These results suggest that population density is an important condition that determines mating behavior. Also, low population density may lead to decreased mate finding ability and lost opportunities for spawning.
Faculty Jennifer Mattei and Mark Beekey are associate professors of biology.
Student Adam Rudmann has worked on Project Limulus during his junior and senior years at SHU and during graduate school at Southern CT State University, with his MS in hand, he is working as an adjunct professor and searching for a full time job, Alyssa Woronik will be a senior biology major at SHU in the fall 2011.
Funding Both students were supported in part by CT Sea Grant and SHU’s College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Initiative.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title UGR Highlight #1
Citation West N Am Nat., 2010; 70: 334-344, Bakker JD, Rudebusch F, Moore MM.. Northern Arizona University
Description This study sampled a unique grazing exclosure to examine the relative importance of long-term livestock (grazed and ungrazed) and habitat (park or tree) on the herbaceous understory stratum in ponderosa pine forests of the American Southwest. The effects of habitat and grazing on species density were evident at very different scales; species density was higher in parks as compared to tree plots. Grazed plots contained more species than ungrazed plots, which also included more exotic species.
Faculty Margaret M. Moore is a Professor in the School of Forestry.
Student Faith Rudebusch was an environmental science major and an undergraduate research assistant with the Ecological Restoration Institute in the School of Forestry. Faith subsequently completed a master's degree in botany from Idaho State University and is currently employed as a high school science teacher.
Funding This senior thesis was supported with funding from Northern Arizona University's Ecological Restoration Institute.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title A multi-trait test of the Leaf-Height-Seed plant strategy scheme with 133 species from a pine forest flora.
Citation Funct Ecol., 2010; 24: 493-501, Laughlin DC, Leppert JJ, Moore MM, Sieg CH.. Northern Arizona University
Description This study examined 10 functional traits on 133 plant species in a ponderosa pine forest in northern Arizona to evaluate how well Westoby’s (1998) Leaf-Height-Seed (LHS) plant ecology strategy scheme accounts for the variation in above and belowground traits. The LHS scheme was well supported in this multi-trait analysis. The three most important functional traits (specific leaf area, seed mass, and height) were composed of multiple correlated traits, but these traits loaded on separate axes. The LHS scheme also accounts for belowground plant function since root traits were correlated with aboveground traits.
Faculty Daniel C. Laughlin is an Assistant Research Professor and Margaret M. Moore is a Professor, School of Forestry.
Student Jessica Leppert was a chemistry major and an undergraduate research assistant with the Ecological Restoration Institute, where she conducted her senior thesis project. She is currently employed.
Funding Jessica received a Northern Arizona University Hooper Sustainability Award to support a portion of this research.

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Reduction in Lyme disease risk as an economic benefit of habitat restoration
Citation Restoration Ecology., 2011; 3: Morlando S, Schmidt SJ, LoGiudice K. Union College (NY)
Description This paper introduces a restoration related ecosystem service, a reduction in the risk of tick-borne disease, and incorporates it into a cost/benefit analysis of the restoration of a rare habitat. We use calculate the costs averted by preventing Lyme disease (LD), and a contingent valuation survey to estimate the benefit of biodiversity protection. Cost-of-illness studies show that the restoration would be justifiable if it averted 75 cases of LD per year. We also establish the perceived value of protecting biodiversity. Residents were willing to pay a significant fraction of the net cost of restoration to protect biodiversity. When these benefits are taken into account, the number of cases of disease that must be averted to justify remediation is reduced.
Faculty Stephen Schmidt is professor of economics, and Kathleen LoGiudice is associate professor of biological sciences.
Student Scott Morlando did his senior thesis work on the project in 2008-09 and is presently employed and applying to graduate programs.
Funding

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Recorded at: 6/13/2012
Title Introducing experimental design by evaluating efficacy of herbal remedies (Do herbal remedies really work?)
Citation Journal of Biological Education, 2010; 44: 4:175-179, Smith RA, Pontiggia L, Waterman C, Lichtenwalner M.. University of the Sciences
Description This study was designed to test the influence of solvents in determining activity of herbal remedies. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was used as the test organism to evaluate extracts of the West African plant, Anogeissus leiocarpus, used for treatment of diarrhea.
Faculty Robert Smith is assistant professor of biology; Laura Pontiggia is assistant professor of statistics.
Student The project was a doctoral project by Carrie Waterman assisted by Meghan Lichtenwalner, who understook the research as a Directed Research project under the direction of Robert Smith. Carrie Waterman is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of South Florida. Meghan Lichtenwalner is currently teaching high school biology and is entering the MS program at Thomas Jefferson University.
Funding The research was supported through funds from the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of the Sciences.